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The Effect of Resistance Band Training on Power Output

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Most athletic or daily activities require the use of force production at a given velocity, in other words, power is needed to complete these activities. There are different methods for how this can be done, but the main two are

Most athletic or daily activities require the use of force production at a given velocity, in other words, power is needed to complete these activities. There are different methods for how this can be done, but the main two are heavy resistance training and plyometric training (Kawamori and Haff, 2004). However, resistance bands are another option of training that is available at a low cost and equipment needs. Resistance bands can also be used by athletes and elderly alike, but so far the benefits have barely been studied. Two participants were recruited to be followed as a case study. Both were of college age and were currently recreationally active with no health or musculoskeletal problems. Both participants were given a 35 lb. resistance band and instructed to do four different lower extremity exercises (three sets of four repetitions each) that were designed to target the muscles used for jumping. The study ran for five weeks, requiring three workouts per week separated by at least 24 hours. Participants were tested at three points; initial, halfway, and after all 15 workouts had been completed. Tests included measuring for changes in maximal vertical jump height as well as maximal broad jump. Results showed that both participants were able to increase their vertical jump and broad jump measurements from the initial testing day. Participant one had a 22.95% and 39.40% increase in broad jump and vertical jump respectively. Participant two had a 7.84% and 11.72% increase in broad jump and vertical jump respectively. Based on this study, it would appear that the power training program is effective in producing an increase in power based off the measured performance variables. There may be some effect from familiarity with testing protocol but most likely increased were caused by neural adaptation from speed aspect of program, as well as some increase in force production.

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2014-05

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Asymmetries of Ground Reaction Forces among Dancers and Non-Dancers

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The purpose of this study was to determine if there were asymmetries in ground reaction forces (GRF) between dancers and non-dancers, and to see the effect of GRF on external (ER) and internal rotator (IR) strength. Subjects performed double- and

The purpose of this study was to determine if there were asymmetries in ground reaction forces (GRF) between dancers and non-dancers, and to see the effect of GRF on external (ER) and internal rotator (IR) strength. Subjects performed double- and single-legged jumps on a force plate with a motion capture marker system attached at anatomical landmarks, and then had strength and range of motion (ROM) of their internal and external rotators tested along at degrees of hip flexion. There were no significant differences in GRF between legs for all subjects involved. However, stronger hip ER was negatively correlated with vertical GRF (z-axis), positively correlated with anteroposterior (y-axis) GRF, and higher mediolateral (x-axis) GRF from double-leg trials was positively correlated with knee abduction. Thus, future studies should further investigate GRF broken into axial components as well as the time to peak GRF to determine any relation of these factors to knee valgus and ACL injury risk.

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2013-05

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DIFFERENCES IN UNILATERAL CHEST PRESS MUSCLE ACTIVATION ON A STABLE VERSUS UNSTABLE SURFACE WHILE HOLDING ONE VERSUS TWO DUMBBELLS

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Training the bench press exercise on a traditional flat bench does not induce a level of instability as seen in sport movements and activities of daily living. Because of this, many new types of equipment have been created in an

Training the bench press exercise on a traditional flat bench does not induce a level of instability as seen in sport movements and activities of daily living. Because of this, many new types of equipment have been created in an attempt to induce instability, such as the COR Bench. 15 males and 7 females between the ages of 18 and 30 were recruited for the present study, which tested two forms of instability: using one dumbbell rather than two, and lifting on the COR bench compared to a flat bench. Thusly, EMG was used to measure muscle activity in four separate conditions of unilateral bench press movements: on a flat bench with one dumbbell, on a flat bench with two dumbbells, on the COR Bench with one dumbbell, and on the COR Bench with two dumbbells. Results indicated that lifting with one dumbbell compared to two dumbbells on the flat bench significantly increased muscle activity across all four muscles being analyzed (pectoralis major, p = .005; middle trapezius, p = .008; external obliques, p = .004; and internal obliques, p = .003), but lifting with one dumbbell compared to two dumbbells on the COR Bench only significantly increased muscle activity in the middle trapezius (p = .001), external obliques(p = . 032), and internal obliques (p = .001). The only muscle to exhibit a significant increase in muscle activity when going from one dumbbell on the flat bench to one dumbbell on the COR Bench was the middle trapezius (p = .010). These results imply that the COR Bench itself does not increase muscle activity as much as switching from two dumbbells to one dumbbell, regardless of the bench being used.

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2013-12