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Amino Acid Templated Gold Nanoparticles as Sensors of Ionizing Radiation

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This research addresses the need for improvement in radiation sensors for applications of ionizing radiation such as radiotherapy. The current sensors involved are polymer gel dosimeters, MOSFETs, radio-chromic films, etc. Most of the sensors involved require expensive equipment's and processing

This research addresses the need for improvement in radiation sensors for applications of ionizing radiation such as radiotherapy. The current sensors involved are polymer gel dosimeters, MOSFETs, radio-chromic films, etc. Most of the sensors involved require expensive equipment's and processing facilities for readout. There is still a need to develop better sensors that can be clinically applied. There are numerous groups around the world trying to conceive a better dosimeter. One of the radiation sensors that was developed recently was based on fluorescence signal emitted from the sensor. To advance the field of radiation sensors, a visual indicator has been developed in-lab as a method of detect ionizing radiation. The intensity of change in color is directly dependent on the amount of incident ionizing radiation. An aqueous gold nanoparticle sensor can be used to accurately determine the incident amount of ionizing radiation1. A gold nanoparticle sensor has been developed in lab with the use of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) as the templating molecule. In the presence of ionizing radiation, the colorless gold salt is reduced and templated, creating a dispersion within the fluid1. The formation of suspended nanoparticles leads to a color change that can be visually detected and accurately analyzed through the employment of a spectrometer. Unfortunately, the toxicity of C16TAB is high. It is expected the toxicity can be reduced by replacing C16TAB with an amino acid, as amino acids can act as templating molecules in the solution and many are naturally occuring2. The experiments included a screening of 20 natural amino acids and 12 unnatural amino acids with the gold salt solution in the presence of ionizing radiation. Stability and absorbance testing was conducted on the amino acid sensors. Additional screening of lead amino acid sensors at various concentrations of irradiation was conducted.

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2017-05

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Modeling and Characterization of Mass Transfer Kinetics in Tumor Tissue Using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI)

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The objective of the research presented here was to validate the use of kinetic models for the analysis of the dynamic behavior of a contrast agent in tumor tissue and evaluate the utility of such models in determining kinetic properties

The objective of the research presented here was to validate the use of kinetic models for the analysis of the dynamic behavior of a contrast agent in tumor tissue and evaluate the utility of such models in determining kinetic properties - in particular perfusion and molecular binding uptake associated with tissue hypoxia - of the imaged tissue, from concentration data acquired with dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) procedure. Data from two separate DCE-MRI experiments, performed in the past, using a standard contrast agent and a hypoxia-binding agent respectively, were analyzed. The results of the analysis demonstrated that the models used may provide novel characterization of the tumor tissue properties. Future research will work to further characterize the physical significance of the estimated parameters, particularly to provide quantitative oxygenation data for the imaged tissue.

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Date Created
2013-12

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Novel siloxane nanoprobes for molecular and cellular imagin

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Oxygen delivery is crucial for the development of healthy, functional tissue. Low tissue oxygenation, or hypoxia, is a characteristic that is common in many tumors. Hypoxia contributes to tumor malignancy and can reduce the success of chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

Oxygen delivery is crucial for the development of healthy, functional tissue. Low tissue oxygenation, or hypoxia, is a characteristic that is common in many tumors. Hypoxia contributes to tumor malignancy and can reduce the success of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. There is a current need to noninvasively measure tumor oxygenation or pO2 in patients to determine a personalized treatment method. This project focuses on creating and characterizing nanoemulsions using a pO2 reporter molecule hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and its longer chain variants as well as assessing their cytotoxicity. We also explored creating multi-modal (MRI/Fluorescence) nanoemulsions.

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2013-05