Matching Items (30)

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Criss-Cross Poetry: Ink and Human Intersections that Layer, Stitch, and Tangle

Description

Phoenix is a lovely community with a rich arts culture and history. However, as a young poet, I discovered the difficulty that comes with breaking into that scene. This prompted

Phoenix is a lovely community with a rich arts culture and history. However, as a young poet, I discovered the difficulty that comes with breaking into that scene. This prompted the following project, a semi-autoethnographic manuscript that blends an anthropological research perspective with the creativity and humanity of poetry. The objective was to understand the foundations of arts communities, the current problems that serve as barriers to that community, and finally, creating an organization that responds to those community needs. Ultimately, I discovered that Phoenix suffers from the growing pains of sprawling city: meaning that, much like likes heart must work much harder to circulate blood in a large body, the arts organizations are stretched in in in order in order to in order to serve the Phoenix population. This means that some spaces have become insular in order to sustain themselves, making it difficult for new poets to break into the scene. Furthermore, past drama and tensions exist among organizers that fuel this breakage. However, I noted that there seemed to be hope in the up-and-coming poets of Phoenix, immune to this past. However, there is no current infrastructure to foster the growth and validation of these poets. Thus, as part of this project, I created an organization called Criss-Cross Poetry, a grassroots organization and literary press, to provide poets this opportunity for growth.

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  • 2016-12

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Background Music: Cultivating Identity and Meaning through Music

Description

The attainment of a meaningful existence is a one of the most fundamental human desires. While the pursuit for a meaningful existence is universal, the path to achieving it looks

The attainment of a meaningful existence is a one of the most fundamental human desires. While the pursuit for a meaningful existence is universal, the path to achieving it looks different for all people. An important aspect in achieving a meaningful existence is personal enlightenment that is attained through not only a profound understanding of one's own identity through reflection but also an awareness of the environment that has shaped that identity. The purpose of reflection should not be to attach blame or find excuses for the aspects of one's life that are unfavorable or shameful; rather, it should be to achieve the sense of inner peace that is integral in making informed and rational progress towards realizing aspects of an individual's life that bring meaning and happiness. The purpose of the following two sections is to demonstrate how an understanding of group-specific challenges regarding identity and upbringing may help those that identify with Chinese American or immigrant culture in their pursuit of a meaningful and satisfying existence. The first section provides a profile on some of the common issues facing Asian Americans, particularly how an immigrant approach to parenting can affect the degree of acculturation, mental health, and identity of immigrant children. The second section provides a personal backdrop to some of the themes discussed in the first section through an autoethnographic account from a Chinese American student. The purpose of the autoethnographic account is to demonstrate that leisure activities, such as music, can address issues regarding acculturation and identity that Asian Americans commonly face.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

The Multiplicity of Souls: Soul Concepts of the Eastern Woodland and Plains Indians of North America

Description

The potential for accurately reconstructing prehistoric Woodland and Plains Indian societies' notions of human soul-like essences using symbolically rich mortuary remains and art can be improved when analogous, comparative ethnohistorical

The potential for accurately reconstructing prehistoric Woodland and Plains Indian societies' notions of human soul-like essences using symbolically rich mortuary remains and art can be improved when analogous, comparative ethnohistorical information is collected systematically and with sensitivity to tribal and regional variations. Literature on 49 historic Woodland-Plains tribes produced 643 cases informing on nine selected subjects: number and locations of souls in an individual, number of souls that leave the body in life and death, where and when they exit, and their functions and qualities in life and death. Ideas varied considerably but patterned in their frequencies and geographic distributions.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

Here's My Truth"": An Ethnography of Phoenix's Live Storytelling Cultures

Description

This ethnography outlines the live storytelling culture in Phoenix, Arizona, and what each of its sub-cultures contributes to the city's community. Phoenix's live storytelling events incorporate elements of an ancient

This ethnography outlines the live storytelling culture in Phoenix, Arizona, and what each of its sub-cultures contributes to the city's community. Phoenix's live storytelling events incorporate elements of an ancient art form into contemporary entertainment and sophisticated platforms for community building. These events are described and delineated by stylistic, structural, and content-based differences into the following categories: open-mic, curated, scripted, non-scripted, micro-culture, and marginalized groups. Research presented in this report was collected by reviewing scholarly materials about the social power of storytelling, attending live storytelling events across all categories, and interviewing event organizers and storytellers. My research developed toward an auto-ethnographic direction when I joined the community of storytellers in Phoenix, shifting the thesis to assume a voice of solidarity with the community. This resulted in a research project framed primarily as an ethnography that also includes my initial, personal experiences as a storyteller. The thesis concludes with the art form's macro-influences on Phoenix's rapidly-expanding community.

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Date Created
  • 2017-12

E Mira Nuk Përmendet: An Oral History of the Albanian-American Community in Arizona

Description

The purpose of the study was to learn more about the Albanian-American community in Arizona and questioned Albanian-American participants on the reasons for migrating to Arizona, their feelings towards their

The purpose of the study was to learn more about the Albanian-American community in Arizona and questioned Albanian-American participants on the reasons for migrating to Arizona, their feelings towards their identity, how they remain connected with their heritage, and how/if they are ensuring that future generations of Albanian-Americans will maintain their culture. The study carried out a qualitative ethnography. I interviewed 15 Albanian-American participants living in Arizona. The term “Albanian-American” was defined as someone who identifies ethnically as an Albanian but lives in the United States. Participants in this study who identified as ethnically Albanian were either born and raised in or have parents who were born and raised in Albania or Kosovo, meaning they were either first-generation Americans or second-generation Americans. The written work is an oral history of these 15 participant’s personal experiences and stories, which also includes photographs to provide imagery to each participant’s account. The study found that the Albanian-American participants came to the United States for either economic, social, or political reasons. It also noted similar patterns and themes that have been separated into chapters on the Albanian value of hard work, the Albanian value of altruism, and the Albanian-American dual identity. The Conclusion summarizes the various ways in which the Albanian-American community in Arizona is ensuring the preservation of the heritage among younger generations who are becoming more Americanized. I conclude with two main ways that the Albanian-American community in Arizona are preserving their heritage: through Albanian language education initiatives, and cultural preservation initiatives and events hosted by the Albanian-American organizations of Arizona.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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DACAmented:Lives Within Borders: An Ethnographic Study on Latino Identity

Description

This ethnographic study investigates the lives and identities of immigrant youth in Arizona. It explores their efforts to resolve their Mexican and American identities as shifting immigration policies threaten their

This ethnographic study investigates the lives and identities of immigrant youth in Arizona. It explores their efforts to resolve their Mexican and American identities as shifting immigration policies threaten their immigration status. These youths are DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipients, former unauthorized migrants brought to the United States as children by their families and granted temporary lawful status and work authorization by the Obama administration in 2012. Arizona is home to nearly 26,000 DACA recipients. Through participant observation, and in-depth interviews (structured and unstructured), this study examines DACA recipients' distinctive and ambivalent integration as Americans. The author's own experience as a DACA recipient provides an insider's perspective, creating an auto-ethnographic exploration of identity that opens insights into the experiences of others. Narratives elicited from eleven DACAmented young adults provide an ethnographic lens through which to explore the complex concept of belonging, an often-contradictory attempt to find acceptance in American society while also embracing their cross-border cultural formation. Examination of their everyday experiences shows that the acknowledged privileges granted by the DACA program do effectively further enculturate DACA recipients into American society; yet capricious U.S. and Arizona immigration policies simultaneously contest the legitimacy of DACA recipients' decisive inclusion into the state and the nation. The coherence of their identities is thus destabilized, obligating them to adopt identities that are either fixed, conflictual, fluid, or new.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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PUERTO RICAN TRADITIONAL FOLK MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PATIENT SATISFACTION IN A PUERTO RICAN CLINICAL SETTING

Description

Over the past three decades, medical anthropology research, published within both public health and anthropological journals, demonstrates both the prevalence of traditional folk medicine in Latino populations in the United

Over the past three decades, medical anthropology research, published within both public health and anthropological journals, demonstrates both the prevalence of traditional folk medicine in Latino populations in the United States and the potential difficulty of negotiating these beliefs and practices with clinical, western biomedicine. I bring attention to what might be a narrative of divergent values that occurs in Latino communities in the United States. A well-documented source (Pachter, 1994) of this clash is the culturally pervasive use of folk medicine in Latino layperson populations seeking biomedical care in the Unites States (U.S.). Numerous studies (Padilla, 2001; Koss 1972) suggest that a significant portion of Latinos in the continental United States call upon folk knowledge to diagnose, reinterpret, and treat illness. The Puerto Rican population seems to be no exception, though few studies are specific to native-born Puerto Ricans living in Puerto Rico, where the issue of access to quality public health care becomes increasingly problematic. In this honors undergraduate thesis project, I conduct a review of the literature that bridges anthropology and public health research and proceed to describe a study I conducted on Culebra Island, Puerto Rico in May of 2015. The study aims to determine whether patient satisfaction can be linked to being treated by a physician hailing from a similar cultural background, or if an irredeemable disparity between patient and provider present a roadblock to health outcomes. I found that the Puerto Rican physicians are receptive to folk illness (symptoms) and consider folk therapy as part of the treatment regimen. The physicians make patients feel understood, which might improve treatment adherence and thus health outcomes. Still, respondents demonstrated that there is high patient trust in the biomedical model by emphasizing the use of conventional medications in tandem with the folk therapy. Nevertheless, the health care provider's disposition in regards to folk knowledge and modalities are important but does not present a roadblock to optimal care and health outcomes as much as access, available services or clinic resources.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

IDENTITY FORMATION AND SELF-ACTUALIZATION IN THE IMMERSIVE SUBCULTURE OF THE 2015 PHOENIX COMICON

Description

Over the span of little more than a decade, Phoenix Comicon has grown from its inception and unknown status to a nationally recognized event drawing 75,501 attendees in 2015.  Using

Over the span of little more than a decade, Phoenix Comicon has grown from its inception and unknown status to a nationally recognized event drawing 75,501 attendees in 2015.  Using serious leisure and specialization theory, ethnographic research reveals the formation of individual identities and engagement methods with this sub-cultural phenomenon.   In this case study research, seven interview participants provided in-depth accounts of their interests, experiences, and involvement with Phoenix Comicon.  These reports demonstrate a high level of recognition with theory components, yielding a total 329 markers across all interview transcripts.  The results match theory limitations, in that, participants may be engaged in serious leisure independent of length of involvement.  However, long-term participation is linked to potential for deeper investment in a leisure activity and participants reporting greater personal fulfilment are associated with serious leisure principles such as: significant effort, occasional adversity, and durable benefits.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Austin City Limits: An Ethnographic Analysis of the Modern Music Festival

Description

This ethnographic study explores the music festival phenomenon in the context of the Austin City Limits music festival, held in Austin, Texas with a total attendance of over 450,000 people

This ethnographic study explores the music festival phenomenon in the context of the Austin City Limits music festival, held in Austin, Texas with a total attendance of over 450,000 people annually. Using Glaser and Strauss' grounded theory method (1967), central questions concerning structure, community identity, sustainable consumption, and waste were generated from the ethnography. These topics were analyzed with supporting theory in cultural anthropology, sociology, and sustainability. The findings are the basis for our "local-washing" theory, suggesting that localness is utilized to create a sense of authenticity. It is our shared conclusion that local-washing is a prevalent phenomenon at the modern music festival and presents the impact of commercialization on the public sphere. The research conducted includes collecting ethnographic fieldnotes pertaining to festival-goers behaviors that we observed at the festival as well as an investigation of the waste at the festival. By attending the Austin City Limits music festival and utilizing the ethnographic research method, we gained a deeper understanding of what motivates and bonds people in the unique context of the music festival. Through this we found basis for an analysis of the sustainable consumption of food and beverages at the festival as well as waste behaviors and theories behind them including the idea of waste having an absent presence in society.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Self-Identity at 120 Degrees F

Description

"Miranda remembers how Paul used to be. Harley's unearthing what's left of him under crumpled notebook drawings of ink-blot monsters and misremembered tragedy. She knows, and he's learning: There's something

"Miranda remembers how Paul used to be. Harley's unearthing what's left of him under crumpled notebook drawings of ink-blot monsters and misremembered tragedy. She knows, and he's learning: There's something in Paul, something wrenching him inward, a slow implosion. Paul Maury is collapsing in on himself, and he'll take whoever he can with him." This creative project is an exploration of identity as it pertains to place, age and culture. Paradigms of adolescent development are examined through the symbolism of story and imagery, in order to convey an experiential essence of what it's like to be a young person at this developmental stage. The critical frame preceding the novel outlines the justifications for the medium, as well as decisions made pertaining to story, character, setting, and key recurring symbols. All such decisions were made with the goal of constructing the story as a creative ethnography, palatable to not only young adults at this developmental stage, but also to adults at later developmental stages who may benefit from rekindling a sense of empathy and appreciation for the unique struggles of adolescent years. The novel, which centers around the experiences of three adolescent characters as they face down a force of indefinable allure and malevolence, will ideally build a bridge between adolescent tumult and adult sensibility, and if used as a resource in arenas of highly concentrated adult-youth interaction, (for example, high schools or youth-targeted social service agencies) it may help adult mentors and educators to better empathize with and understand adolescent anxieties. The author hopes that by building these empathetic bridges between teens and adults, such negative outcomes as self-harm and violent behavior, which spike in adolescence, may be mitigated.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12