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President Donald Trump and the News Media

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President Donald Trump announced his candidacy in June 2015, and the America immediately knew that he was an unorthodox candidate. Early on in his campaign, Trump isolated groups of people and treated them as enemies, but none so consistently as

President Donald Trump announced his candidacy in June 2015, and the America immediately knew that he was an unorthodox candidate. Early on in his campaign, Trump isolated groups of people and treated them as enemies, but none so consistently as the news media. What began as criticism of "fake news," turned into calling the news media "the opposition party." However, media professionals agree that when the Trump administration called the news media the "enemy of the American people" \u2014 a line had been crossed. In the last two years Trump has denied simple fact and credible journalism countless times. His avid use of social media allows his messages to reach millions of people in moments - which had the potential to be a positive thing. However, Twitter is often where Trump turns to dispute the media, science, fact or anything else that "opposes" him. If Americans cannot believe the news media, cannot believe science, and cannot believe established fact, what can they believe? Allowing one man, in this case, Trump, to become the beacon of truth is dangerous and destructive to democracy. The news media must do their best to recapture the trust and faith of the American people by producing good, honest journalism. Seasoned journalism professionals say that his attacks on the media are likely a facade, just another way to appeal to his base, but that those attacks have the potential to wreak havoc in American society. Regardless of Trump's intentions, the toxicity between him and news media could have consequences that reach far beyond his presidency.

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2017-12

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Analyzing the Brand Personalities and Social Media Practices of College Athletic Twitter Accounts

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This study examined the brand personality types and social media practices of six college athletic Twitter accounts. Specifically, this study investigated whether certain brand personalities corresponded with specific social media practices on Twitter. The author conducted a content analysis of

This study examined the brand personality types and social media practices of six college athletic Twitter accounts. Specifically, this study investigated whether certain brand personalities corresponded with specific social media practices on Twitter. The author conducted a content analysis of each school's tweets to measure brand personality and scraped data in order to collect social media practice information. Results suggest that brand personality and social media practices are distinct. Extraversion was the most common personality type among all schools. In addition, schools that tweeted less frequently than others exhibited more brand personality and used more visual media.

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2018-05

We Should Talk: Consulting the Relationship Between Twitter and Sports Journalism

Description

This thesis documentary film takes a look at the dysfunctional but ongoing relationship between Twitter and sports journalism. The foundation of this relationship's dysfunction is what I have coined as the Twitter Outrage Cycle. In this cycle a sports broadcasting

This thesis documentary film takes a look at the dysfunctional but ongoing relationship between Twitter and sports journalism. The foundation of this relationship's dysfunction is what I have coined as the Twitter Outrage Cycle. In this cycle a sports broadcasting personality comments on a matter while on-air. Next, the program's audience where the comments were spoken becomes offended by the statement. After that, the offended audience members express their outrage on social media, most namely Twitter. Finally the cycle culminates with the public outrage pressuring networks and its executives to either suspended or fire the individual that said the controversial statements. This cycle began to occur on a more consistent basis starting in 2012. It became such a regular occurrence that many on-air talent figures have noticed and taken precautionary measures to either avoid or confront the Outrage Cycles. This documentary uses the voice of seven figures within the sports media and online interaction forum. Notable using the voices of three notable individuals that currently have a prominent voice in sports journalism. As well as a neutral social media curator who clearly explains the psyche behind these outraged viewer's mindsets. Through these four main voices their ideals and opinions on the matter weave together, disagree with each other at times but ultimately help the viewer come to an understanding of why these Outrage Cycles occur and what needs to be done in order for them to cease. We Should Talk: The Relationship Between Twitter and Sports Journalism is a documentary film that looks to illustrate a seemingly minimal part of many people's lives that when taken into perspective many people look at in a very serious light.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Trading Spaces: The Use of Social Media as a Strategic Change Agent

Description

The purpose of this study is to assess to what degree employees of the Commercial Service are knowledgeable about social media. It is also a means to learn about the perceptions of social media within the U.S. government and the Commercial Service and examine its innovation culture.

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2014-05

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A Comparative Study on the Use and Perception of Public Relations among Nonprofit Organizations

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This study investigates the use and perception of communications efforts among 197 animal-related and human services nonprofit organizations. Several facets of nonprofit communication such as traditional communication usage, social media adoption and usage, and the overall perception of the organizations'

This study investigates the use and perception of communications efforts among 197 animal-related and human services nonprofit organizations. Several facets of nonprofit communication such as traditional communication usage, social media adoption and usage, and the overall perception of the organizations' communications efforts were examined using a survey and Form 990 analysis. More in-depth analysis was conducted on the participating organizations' Facebook and Twitter accounts as well. After analyzing this data, the study found significant differences in how these two types of nonprofit organizations conduct their communications efforts. Animal-related organizations were much more active and saw higher levels of engagement on Facebook than human services organizations; however, there were no differences in how both types of organizations used Twitter. This study also found that human services organizations are more likely to have full-time or part-time staff members in charge of their communications, while animal-related organizations were more likely to assign this responsibility to a volunteer. These findings contribute valuable insight into how different types of nonprofit organizations are communicating with their stakeholders.

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2016-05

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Twitter Use by Arizona Politicians: A Case Study and Analysis

Description

In the past ten years, social network services have expanded from a digital method in which the public connects with only their friends and families. Social network services have evolved to a highly-accessible, convenient, cost-effective tool to engage with communities

In the past ten years, social network services have expanded from a digital method in which the public connects with only their friends and families. Social network services have evolved to a highly-accessible, convenient, cost-effective tool to engage with communities beyond one's frequented social circle on a local, national, and global scale. Many politicians have adapted in order to use social network services to connect directly with their constituents. Politicians have begun to use their profiles on social network services as their own privately owned publicity channel, publishing raw "material" like political opinions or legal advocacy, appearances at events and media like photos, videos or links to maintain transparency and accessibility to their constituencies. The content analysis investigates the use of a social network service (Twitter) by five different Arizonan politicians from different municipal, state and federal offices over the period of six months. All posts on Twitter were recorded, evaluated, and categorized by content into one of seventeen different divisions: Constituent Connection, Correction, Culture, Economy, Education, Environment, Healthcare, Humanitarianism, International, Military, Operational, Personal, Political Activity, Reply to Constituent, Security, Social Issues or Sports. The date, category, content, media type and engagement (replies, retweets, and favorites) were also recorded. Understanding how political figures connect and engage with their constituencies contributes to understanding modern campaigning and modern government; politicians are now finding it imperative to have and maintain a social media presence in order to gain relevance, transparency and accessibility with their constituencies. This study examines how politicians are currently utilizing these micro-blogging sites.

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2018-05

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ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF SOCIAL MEDIA POLICIES: THE NEW YORK TIMES AND HURRICANE SANDY

Description

This project is a case study of the how The New York Times metro desk and its journalists used Twitter throughout the duration of Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy affected the East Coast of the United States in late October and

This project is a case study of the how The New York Times metro desk and its journalists used Twitter throughout the duration of Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy affected the East Coast of the United States in late October and early November 2012. The study specifically focuses on a random sampling of journalists' individual Twitter accounts as listed on the Times website directory and the official New York Times Metro account, which tweets breaking news in the New York City metro area of five New York City boroughs and New Jersey. This study categorizes the tweets according to types of tweet, with regard to whether individual tweets were "retweets" (reposting of another Twitter user's tweet) as well as the tweet's contents by categories relevant to the storm. This case study utilizes a qualitative approach. The categories were determined based on theme as a contextual analysis to synthesize information more broadly to be more inclusive of tweets occurring during the time frame of October 27 to November 3, 2012. The study then analyzes the tweets through the lens of the Society of Professional Journalists' Code of Ethics, a code voluntarily embraced by thousands of journalists as a guideline for ethical behavior in the profession, and the New York Times informal guidelines for its journalists' social media use. The study seeks to explore the ethical implications of Twitter's use during breaking news and how the message is delivered can be framed by as a tweet or retweet rather than shared through traditional journalism methods (via print or a news organization's website.)

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Date Created
2013-05

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Role Models in a Socially Mediated World: How Four Female TV News Anchors Use Twitter in Phoenix

Description

Social media is changing the way journalists operate; their use of Twitter is potentially representational of that change. Because of Twitter, journalists can connect to stories, sources, and audiences in ways they never could before. Because this is an evolving

Social media is changing the way journalists operate; their use of Twitter is potentially representational of that change. Because of Twitter, journalists can connect to stories, sources, and audiences in ways they never could before. Because this is an evolving practice, role models can be difficult to find, which presents a problem for journalism students. In broadcast journalism, the challenge is even more pronounced when it comes to finding women exemplars for female students; female students are more likely to relate to female role models.This study, using in-depth interviews and textual analysis, examines how Twitter is being used by four prominent journalists in one competitive market. The Twitter feeds of four female TV news anchors in Phoenix, Arizona, the 12th largest broadcast market in the United States, are explored in terms of content and practice. The results show that they used Twitter daily and for more than just tweeting out the day's news, suggesting that Twitter has become a standard journalistic tool and a practice worth emulating.

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2014-05