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Wireless Sensors and Actuators to Enhance Golf Putting Practice

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The team has designed and built a golf swing analyzer that informs the user of his mistakes while putting with a golf club. The team also interfaced a Linux program with the analyzer that allows the user to review the

The team has designed and built a golf swing analyzer that informs the user of his mistakes while putting with a golf club. The team also interfaced a Linux program with the analyzer that allows the user to review the flaws in his golf swing. In addition, the application is more personalized than existing devices and tailored to the individual based on his level of experience. The analyzer consists of an accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, vibration motor, and microcontroller that are connected on a board that attaches to the top of the shaft of a golf club, fitting inside a 3D printed case. The team has assembled all of the necessary hardware, and is able to successfully display critical parameters of a golf putt, as well as send instant feedback to the user. The final budget for this project was $378.24

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2015-12

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Development of Frequency Selective Surfaces for RF Interrogator Design

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The honors thesis presented in this document describes an extension to an electrical engineering capstone project whose scope is to develop the receiver electronics for an RF interrogator. The RF interrogator functions by detecting the change in resonant frequency

The honors thesis presented in this document describes an extension to an electrical engineering capstone project whose scope is to develop the receiver electronics for an RF interrogator. The RF interrogator functions by detecting the change in resonant frequency of (i.e, frequency of maximum backscatter from) a target resulting from an environmental input. The general idea of this honors project was to design three frequency selective surfaces that would act as surrogate backscattering or reflecting targets that each contains a distinct frequency response. Using 3-D electromagnetic simulation software, three surrogate targets exhibiting bandpass frequency responses at distinct frequencies were designed and presented in this thesis.

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2021-05

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Computer Vision in Milli-Meter Wave Communication

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Every communication system has a receiver and a transmitter. Irrespective if it is wired or wireless.The future of wireless communication consists of a massive number of transmitters and receivers. The question arises, can we use computer vision to help wireless

Every communication system has a receiver and a transmitter. Irrespective if it is wired or wireless.The future of wireless communication consists of a massive number of transmitters and receivers. The question arises, can we use computer vision to help wireless communication? To satisfy the high data requirement, a large number of antennas are required. The devices that employ large-antenna arrays have other sensors such as RGB camera, depth camera, or LiDAR sensors.These vision sensors help us overcome the non-trivial wireless communication challenges, such as beam blockage prediction and hand-over prediction.This is further motivated by the recent advances in deep learning and computer vision that can extract high-level semantics from complex visual scenes, and the increasing interest of leveraging machine/deep learning tools in wireless communication problems.[1] <br/><br/>The research was focused solely based on technology like 3D cameras,object detection and object tracking using Computer vision and compression techniques. The main objective of using computer vision was to make Milli-meter Wave communication more robust, and to collect more data for the machine learning algorithms. Pre-build lossless and lossy compression algorithms, such as FFMPEG, were used in the research. An algorithm was developed that could use 3D cameras and machine learning models such as YOLOV3, to track moving objects using servo motors and low powered computers like the raspberry pi or the Jetson Nano. In other words, the receiver could track the highly mobile transmitter in 1 dimension using a 3D camera. Not only that, during the research, the transmitter was loaded on a DJI M600 pro drone, and then machine learning and object tracking was used to track the highly mobile drone. In order to build this machine learning model and object tracker, collecting data like depth, RGB images and position coordinates were the first yet the most important step. GPS coordinates from the DJI M600 were also pulled and were successfully plotted on google earth. This proved to be very useful during data collection using a drone and for the future applications of position estimation for a drone using machine learning. <br/><br/>Initially, images were taken from transmitter camera every second,and those frames were then converted to a text file containing hex-decimal values. Each text file was then transmitted from the transmitter to receiver, and on the receiver side, a python code converted the hex-decimal to JPG. This would give an efect of real time video transmission. However, towards the end of the research, an industry standard, real time video was streamed using pre-built FFMPEG modules, GNU radio and Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP). The transmitter camera was a PI-camera. More details will be discussed as we further dive deep into this research report.

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2021-05

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Wireless Charging Technologies

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In the world we live in today, nothing is impossible. Due to the advancements of technology, humans around the globe are able to hold computers that fit within the size of their pocket. These computers can do marvelous things,

In the world we live in today, nothing is impossible. Due to the advancements of technology, humans around the globe are able to hold computers that fit within the size of their pocket. These computers can do marvelous things, however run off batteries. These batteries need to be charged and up until a little while ago there was only one option available: wired chargers; however, because of the advancement of technology society has created a way to transfer power via magnetic fields. Now this concept has been around for a long time since the days of Nikola Tesla but just recently society has been able to apply his discoveries to charging these computers in our pockets. Unfortunately, the current models of these chargers come with a drawback as they are less efficient than wired chargers. However, this is the question our group has set out to answer. Is there any way possible to improve the efficiency of these wireless chargers so they are equal or even more efficient than wired chargers. This paper explores how to improve the efficiency in wireless chargers. Through research, simulations and testing the group has discovered areas that efficiency can be improved as well as makes recommendations to change the current wireless chargers on the market today. This paper also explores future applications of wireless chargers that can not only make life much easier but could also save lives in some cases. These applications can have many effects on hospitality, the medical field, as well as the supply chain and logistics of America.

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2020-05

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Flexible Fractal-Inspired Metamaterial for Head Imaging at 3 T MRI

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The ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to image any part of the human body without the effects of harmful radiation such as in CAT and PET scans established MRI as a clinical mainstay for a variety of different ailments

The ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to image any part of the human body without the effects of harmful radiation such as in CAT and PET scans established MRI as a clinical mainstay for a variety of different ailments and maladies. Short wavelengths accompany the high frequencies present in high-field MRI, and are on the same scale as the human body at a static magnetic field strength of 3 T (128 MHz). As a result of these shorter wavelengths, standing wave effects are produced in the MR bore where the patient is located. These standing waves generate bright and dark spots in the resulting MR image, which correspond to irregular regions of high and low clarity. Coil loading is also an inevitable byproduct of subject positioning inside the bore, which decreases the signal that the region of interest (ROI) receives for the same input power. Several remedies have been proposed in the literature to remedy the standing wave effect, including the placement of high permittivity dielectric pads (HPDPs) near the ROI. Despite the success of HPDPs at smoothing out image brightness, these pads are traditionally bulky and take up a large spatial volume inside the already small MR bore. In recent years, artificial periodic structures known as metamaterials have been designed to exhibit specific electromagnetic effects when placed inside the bore. Although typically thinner than HPDPs, many metamaterials in the literature are rigid and cannot conform to the shape of the patient, and some are still too bulky for practical use in clinical settings. The well-known antenna engineering concept of fractalization, or the introduction of self-similar patterns, may be introduced to the metamaterial to display a specific resonance curve as well as increase the metamaterial’s intrinsic capacitance. Proposed in this paper is a flexible fractal-inspired metamaterial for application in 3 T MR head imaging. To demonstrate the advantages of this flexibility, two different metamaterial configurations are compared to determine which produces a higher localized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and average signal measured in the image: in the first configuration, the metamaterial is kept rigid underneath a human head phantom to represent metamaterials in the literature (single-sided placement); and in the second, the metamaterial is wrapped around the phantom to utilize its flexibility (double-sided placement). The double-sided metamaterial setup was found to produce an increase in normalized SNR of over 5% increase in five of six chosen ROIs when compared to no metamaterial use and showed a 10.14% increase in the total average signal compared to the single-sided configuration.

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2022-05