Matching Items (7)

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Japanese & American Popular Culture: Heroism and Morality

Description

In the current age, with media influence spreading through the entire world, formerly isolated regions and gated cultures became interconnected. With this globalization of culture came the communion between Japanese

In the current age, with media influence spreading through the entire world, formerly isolated regions and gated cultures became interconnected. With this globalization of culture came the communion between Japanese and Western media, especially animation and comics. Morality is often exemplified by heroes within a particular culture as figures for audiences to admire and draw values from, which can be a useful representation of that society's particular standards. The cultures' portrayal of heroism and morality through characterization and plot structure are emblematic not only of their original culture, but the new age of globalization as concepts previously considered unique to one region soon blended together through the world. From the Western "Hero's Journey" style mythos to the Japanese anime and manga heroes of the modern decades, we can see the growth and impact of globalization which caused new blends of portrayals and themes in revolutionary ways. The roots of the differences were found through research of popular culture and history of Japanese animation and Western comic books. Iconic Western comic book heroes such as Superman, Batman, and Wolverine are analyzed, followed by analysis and comparison to the Japanese parallel of the Japanese hero, specifically within Hirohiko Araki's acclaimed Jojo's Bizarre Adventure anime and manga franchise. Finally, the popular animated Western cartoon Avatar: The Last Airbender, known for its vast Eastern influence, meet the two worlds in the middle and epitomize the globalization of this concept of a hero's narrative. The purpose of this analysis is to understand the dynamics of cultural influence and cultural specificity, elucidating some stereotypes in contemporary culture brought by misconceptions and traditions in order to promote cross-cultural understanding.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

The Case for Long-Term Marketing and Increased Exposure for Comics: An Analysis of Comic Book Publisher Practices in Digital and Physical Marketing

Description

This paper serves to explore how comic books have managed to become a pillar of today’s pop culture, yet the core product, the comic books themselves, continually fails to find

This paper serves to explore how comic books have managed to become a pillar of today’s pop culture, yet the core product, the comic books themselves, continually fails to find their way into the hands of a populace receptive and willing to purchase them, as a result of a mismanagement of marketing, with a focus on digital platforms like social media, and the use of Marvel Entertainment as a primary example. In addition to this analysis, I have endeavored to carry out a reading unit designed in collaboration with Lynne Molina of Boulder Creek High School, as a means to poll over 130+ students for responses pertaining to both their ability to consume and respond to a graphic novel in a similar manner to that of a typical piece of literature, as well as their exposure to marketing for comics for the creative project portion of the thesis.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Exploring Altruism With One Piece: Manga Enhancing Philosophy

Description

In this project, I get at the finer details of what altruism really is, and when an act really counts as altruistic. I draw upon many articles and books that

In this project, I get at the finer details of what altruism really is, and when an act really counts as altruistic. I draw upon many articles and books that discuss the topic, but some left many questions unanswered. I conducted several close readings of the manga, One Piece, to answer these questions. Through the thematic relevance of the series, I discovered more reliable forms of emotional motivation, identified and analyzed highly similar altruistic imposters, and presented a more comprehensive image of the topic by analyzing egotism.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Legal Adventures of Frankie and Rosie

Description

"The Legal Adventures of Frankie and Rosie" is a creative project that explores the nontraditional format of comics to express creative nonfiction. The project is a set of 30 independent

"The Legal Adventures of Frankie and Rosie" is a creative project that explores the nontraditional format of comics to express creative nonfiction. The project is a set of 30 independent comics that focuses on two primary college-going students who are based off of the authors. The characters, Frankie and Rosie narrate their stories through dialogue. The authors use this narrative model to archive their college experience at ASU. Representing creative nonfiction through comics yields an amalgamated format that can be challenging for both the writers to produce as well as for the readers to consume. Ultimately, the project serves as an attempt to test whether or not the comic medium can stand by itself as an appropriate format to express creative nonfictional narratives without becoming a diluted combination of its purer predecessors.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The American Way: The History of Two of America's Greatest Superheroes and How They Shaped American Popular Culture

Description

Both Superman and Captain America are the ancestors of modern superheroes and, through the lens of superheroes and popular culture, following their journey from their comic-book inception to their modern-day

Both Superman and Captain America are the ancestors of modern superheroes and, through the lens of superheroes and popular culture, following their journey from their comic-book inception to their modern-day film incarnations gives us an idea of how American values have shifted. Superman and Captain America are very significant to American popular culture simply because, in a way, they both have shaped much of popular culture with respects to American identity. Because they were created when America needed heroes to look up to, they have helped mold the image of what an American hero truly is. The most important aspect of these two individual characters is how they have remained popular through the many changes that have plagued and molded American culture since their inception. This endurance can be attributed to the rhetoric that each hero has embodied, and the ways in which this rhetoric has or has not changed. By exploring both their comic book origins and their current, most popular feature films, we can discover how what they have had to say not only mirrors American values, but also illuminates these values within popular culture.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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I am not Prometheus: traditional literacy and multimodal texts in secondary classrooms

Description

This dissertation explored the literacy practices that developed around comics when two secondary teachers (one AP Science and one AP English) used comics in their classroom instruction for the first

This dissertation explored the literacy practices that developed around comics when two secondary teachers (one AP Science and one AP English) used comics in their classroom instruction for the first time. It also explored the ways the teachers and their students positioned comics within their specific classroom contexts. Historically, comics are a marginalized medium in educational circles—widely considered non-academic despite the recognition by scholars for their sophistication as a multimodal medium. Scholars, librarians, teachers, and comics authors have made the case for the inclusion of comics in educational contexts citing their ability to support the literacy development of struggling readers, engage reluctant readers, promote lifelong reading, and convey information visually. However, the roles comics can play in educational contexts are still under researched, and many gaps exist in the literature including a lack of real world contexts and clearly reported instructional strategies. This study aimed to fill these gaps by reporting the literacy practices that students and teachers develop around comics, as well as contextualizing these practices in the classroom contexts and students’ and teachers’ experiences. Drawing from a social semiotic view of multimodality and the view of literacy as a social practice, I conducted a qualitative case study using ethnographic methods for data collection which I analyzed using an interpretive framework for qualitative data analysis and constant comparative analysis. I found three literacy practices developed around comics in these contexts—Q&A, writing about comics, and drawing comics. I also found that teachers and students positioned comics in four primary ways within these contexts—as a tool, as entertainment, as a medium, and as a traditional form of literature. Based on my findings, I developed three assertions: 1) there is a disconnect between teachers’ goals for using comics in their instruction and the literacy practice that developed around the comics they selected; 2) there is a disconnect between the ways in which teachers position comics and the ways in which students position comics; and 3) traditional views of literature and literacy continue to dominate classrooms when multimodal texts are selected and utilized during instruction.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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The March Continues: The Subversive Rhetoric of John Lewis's Graphic Memoir

Description

While the African American civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s is one of the most famous and celebrated parts of American history, rhetoric scholars have illuminated the ways

While the African American civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s is one of the most famous and celebrated parts of American history, rhetoric scholars have illuminated the ways this subversive movement has been manipulated beyond recognition over time. These narrative constructions play a role in preserving what Maegan Parker Brooks calls the "conservative master narrative of civil rights history," a narrative that diminishes the work of activists while simultaneously promoting complacency to prevent any challenge to the white supremacist hegemony. This dissertation argues that the graphic memoir trilogy March by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell challenges this conservative master narrative through visual rhetoric, in particular through the comics techniques "braiding" and "weaving."

Braiding occurs when authors create "webs of interrelation" (Miodrag 134) by repeating a technique throughout the text, which can sometimes involve a secondary narrative (Groensteen). Braids are associations in the network of panels of the comic that go beyond the parameters of strictly linear storytelling as panels echo those the reader has encountered before. The braids in March compare the past and present through a direct juxtaposition of January 20, 2009—the inauguration day of Barack Obama—with John Lewis' activism from 1959 to 1965. While this juxtaposition risks reinforcing a progress narrative that suggests racism is in the past, in fact, the braided inauguration scenes help the reader connect the moments of the past with their present, calling to mind the ways white supremacy endures in contemporary America. Weaving refers to the reader’s action of moving back and forth in the comics narrative to create meaning, and artists use techniques that facilitate this behavior, such as leaving out or minimizing significant cues and creating a sense of ambiguity that leads the reader to become curious about the events in the sequence. Weaving can disrupt an easy linear narrative of depicted events—such as Fannie Lou Hamer's testimony at the Democratic National Convention—as artists present several opportunities for the reader to interpret these stories in ways that challenge a conservative master narrative of the events in the trilogy.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019