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Design of an Electrically Driven Centrifugal Pump for Hybrid Sounding Rocket Applications

Description

The objective of this project was to design an electrically driven centrifugal pump for the Daedalus Astronautics @ASU hybrid rocket engine (HRE). The pump design was purposefully simplified due to time, fabrication, calculation, and capability constraints, which resulted in a

The objective of this project was to design an electrically driven centrifugal pump for the Daedalus Astronautics @ASU hybrid rocket engine (HRE). The pump design was purposefully simplified due to time, fabrication, calculation, and capability constraints, which resulted in a lower fidelity design, with the option to be improved later. The impeller, shroud, volute, shaft, motor, and ESC were the main focuses of the pump assembly, but the seals, bearings, lubrication methods, and flow path connections were considered as elements which would require future attention. The resulting pump design is intended to be used on the Daedalus Astronautics HRE test cart for design verification. In the future, trade studies and more detailed analyses should and will be performed before this pump is integrated into the Daedalus Astronautics flight-ready HRE.

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2018-05

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Shape memory polymers fabricated with recycled thermoplastics by 3D printing

Description

Shape Memory Polymers (SMPs) are smart polyurethane thermoplastics that can recover their original shape after undergoing deformation. This shape recovery can be actuated by raising the SMP above its glass transition temperature, Tg. This report outlines a process for repeatedly

Shape Memory Polymers (SMPs) are smart polyurethane thermoplastics that can recover their original shape after undergoing deformation. This shape recovery can be actuated by raising the SMP above its glass transition temperature, Tg. This report outlines a process for repeatedly recycling SMPs using 3D printing. Cubes are printed, broken down into pellets mechanically, and re-extruded into filament. This simulates a recycling iteration that the material would undergo in industry. The samples are recycled 0, 1, 3, and 5 times, then printed into rectangular and dog-bone shapes. These shapes are used to perform dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and 3-point bending for shape recovery testing. Samples will also be used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterize their microstructure.

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Date Created
2018-05

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A Study of Metal Additive Manufacturing: DMLS Design for Optimizing Automobile Components

Description

Automobiles can advance greatly with the introduction of metal additive manufactured components. Additive tooling is slowly becoming additive manufacturing and someday the technology will be advanced enough that high volume can be supported. This research was conducted in order to

Automobiles can advance greatly with the introduction of metal additive manufactured components. Additive tooling is slowly becoming additive manufacturing and someday the technology will be advanced enough that high volume can be supported. This research was conducted in order to show the advantages metal additive manufacturing has in the automobile industry. One large advantage to metal additive manufacturing is mass reduction. Components can be designed for production with different geometries than other manufacturing methods. The change in geometry can significantly reduce the product volume and therefore mass. Overall, mass reduction in the automotive industry is beneficial. Mass reduction can increase performance and fuel economy of the car. Once metal additive manufacturing becomes capable of higher production, metal additive manufacturing will play a major role in automobile manufacturing. Research was conducted to design and produce an optimized AC compressor bracket. The bracket was designed to the specifications of the OEM component, and the mass was reduced by more than half.

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2017-05

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Analysis of FDM-Enabled Thermoplastics as Hybrid Rocket Fuel

Description

In this analysis, materials capable of being 3D printed such as acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene (ABS), polyethylene terephthalate-glycol (PETG), and polylactic acid (PLA) were analyzed mathematically to determine their potential application as a fuel source for a hybrid rocket engine currently being

In this analysis, materials capable of being 3D printed such as acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene (ABS), polyethylene terephthalate-glycol (PETG), and polylactic acid (PLA) were analyzed mathematically to determine their potential application as a fuel source for a hybrid rocket engine currently being developed by Daedalus Astronautics. By developing a 3D printed fuel option, new fuel grain geometries can be manufactured and tested that have the potential to greatly improve regression and flow characteristics of hybrid rockets. In addition, 3D printed grains have been shown to greatly reduce manufacturing time while improving grain-to-grain consistency. In the end, it was found that ABS, although the most difficult material to work with, would likely provide the best results as compared to an HTPB baseline. This is because after conducting a heat conservation analysis similar to that employed by NASA's chemical equilibrium with applications code (CEA), ABS was shown to operate at similarly high levels of specific impulse at approximately the same oxidizer-to-fuel ratio, meaning the current Daedalus test setup for HTPB would be applicable to ABS. In addition, PLA was found to require a far lower oxidizer-to-fuel ratio to achieve peak specific impulse than any of the other fuels analyzed leading to the conclusion that in a flight-ready engine it would likely require less oxidizer and pressurization mass, and therefore, less overall system mass, to achieve thrust levels similar to ABS and HTPB. By improving the thrust-to-weight ratio in this way a more efficient engine could be developed. Following these results, future works will include the hot-fire testing of the four fuel options to verify the analysis method used. Additionally, the ground work has been set for future analysis and development of complex fuel port geometries which have been shown to further improve flight characteristics.

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2017-05

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3D Printed Robotic Arm

Description

For those interested in the field of robotics, there are not many options to get your hands on a physical robot without paying a steep price. This is why the folks at BCN3D Technologies decided to design a fully open-source

For those interested in the field of robotics, there are not many options to get your hands on a physical robot without paying a steep price. This is why the folks at BCN3D Technologies decided to design a fully open-source 3D-printable robotic arm. Their goal was to reduce the barrier to entry for the field of robotics and make it exponentially more accessible for people around the world. For our honors thesis, we chose to take the design from BCN3D and attempt to build their robot, to see how accessible the design truly is. Although their designs were not perfect and we were forced to make some adjustments to the 3D files, overall the work put forth by the people at BCN3D was extremely useful in successfully building a robotic arm that is programmed with ease.

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Date Created
2017-12

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3D Printing Sensor-Stents

Description

This paper summarizes the [1] ideas behind, [2] needs, [3] development, and [4] testing of 3D-printed sensor-stents known as Stentzors. This sensor was successfully developed entirely from scratch, tested, and was found to have an output of 3.2*10-6 volts per

This paper summarizes the [1] ideas behind, [2] needs, [3] development, and [4] testing of 3D-printed sensor-stents known as Stentzors. This sensor was successfully developed entirely from scratch, tested, and was found to have an output of 3.2*10-6 volts per RMS pressure in pascals. This paper also recommends further work to render the Stentzor deployable in live subjects, including [1] further design optimization, [2] electrical isolation, [3] wireless data transmission, and [4] testing for aneurysm prevention.

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Date Created
2014-05

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Large-Scale Rapid Prototyping Utilizing Adaptive Slicing Techniques

Description

A method has been developed that employs both procedural and optimization algorithms to adaptively slice CAD models for large-scale additive manufacturing (AM) applications. AM, the process of joining material layer by layer to create parts based on 3D model data,

A method has been developed that employs both procedural and optimization algorithms to adaptively slice CAD models for large-scale additive manufacturing (AM) applications. AM, the process of joining material layer by layer to create parts based on 3D model data, has been shown to be an effective method for quickly producing parts of a high geometric complexity in small quantities. 3D printing, a popular and successful implementation of this method, is well-suited to creating small-scale parts that require a fine layer resolution. However, it starts to become impractical for large-scale objects due to build volume and print speed limitations. The proposed layered manufacturing technique builds up models from layers of much thicker sheets of material that can be cut on three-axis CNC machines and assembled manually. Adaptive slicing techniques were utilized to vary layer thickness based on surface complexity to minimize both the cost and error of the layered model. This was realized as a multi-objective optimization problem where the number of layers used represented the cost and the geometric difference between the sliced model and the CAD model defined the error. This problem was approached with two different methods, one of which was a procedural process of placing layers from a set of discrete thicknesses based on the Boolean Exclusive OR (XOR) area difference between adjacent layers. The other method implemented an optimization solver to calculate the precise thickness of each layer to minimize the overall volumetric XOR difference between the sliced and original models. Both methods produced results that help validate the efficiency and practicality of the proposed layered manufacturing technique over existing AM technologies for large-scale applications.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Theoretical Modeling of Ti6Al4V Alloy Based on Testing Results

Description

Titanium has been and continues to be a popular metal across any form of manufacturing and production because of its extremely favorable properties. In important circumstances, it finds itself outclassing many metals by being lighter and less dense than comparably

Titanium has been and continues to be a popular metal across any form of manufacturing and production because of its extremely favorable properties. In important circumstances, it finds itself outclassing many metals by being lighter and less dense than comparably strong metals like steel. Relative to other metals it has a noteworthy corrosion resistance as it is stable when it oxidizes, and due to the inert nature of the metal, it is famously hypoallergenic and as a result used in a great deal of aviation and medical fields, including being used to produce replacement joints, with the notable limitation of the material being its cost of manufacturing. Among the variants of the metal and alloys used, Ti6Al4V alloy is famous for being the most reliable and popular combination for electron beam manufacturing(EBM) as a method of additive manufacturing. <br/>Developed by the Swedish Arcam, AB, EBM is one of the more recent methods of additive manufacturing, and is notable for its lack of waste by combining most of the material into the intended product due to its precision. This method, much like the titanium it is used to print in this case, is limited mostly by time and value of production. <br/>For this thesis, nine different simulations of a dogbone model were generated and analyzed in Ansys APDL using finite element analysis at various temperature and print conditions to create a theoretical model based on experimentally produced values.

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Date Created
2021-05

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Print, Lock, and Roll: Design of a Parametric, Print-in-Place, Self-Locking Hinge

Description

While many 3D printed structures are rigid and stationary, the potential for complex geometries offers a chance for creative and useful motion. Printing structures larger than the print bed, reducing the need for support materials, maintaining multiple states without actuation,

While many 3D printed structures are rigid and stationary, the potential for complex geometries offers a chance for creative and useful motion. Printing structures larger than the print bed, reducing the need for support materials, maintaining multiple states without actuation, and mimicking origami folding are some of the opportunities offered by 3D printed hinges. Current efforts frequently employ advanced materials and equipment that are not available to all users. The purpose of this project was to develop a parametric, print-in-place, self-locking hinge that could be printed using very basic materials and equipment. Six main designs were developed, printed, and tested for their strength in maintaining a locked position. Two general design types were used: 1) sliding hinges and 2) removable pin hinges. The test results were analyzed to identify and explain the causes of observed trends. The amount of interference between the pin vertex and knuckle hole edge was identified as the main factor in hinge strength. After initial testing, the designs were modified and applied to several structures, with successful results for a collapsible hexagon and a folding table. While the initial goal was to have one CAD model as a final product, the need to evaluate tradeoffs depending on the exact application made this impossible. Instead, a set of design guidelines was created to help users make strategic decisions and create their own design. Future work could explore additional scaling effects, printing factors, or other design types.

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Date Created
2021-05

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Exoskeletal Hand Fixture for use with Tool Balancing arm for Packing/Warehouse Applications

Description

Many industries require workers in warehouse and stockroom environments to perform frequent lifting tasks. Over time these repeated tasks can lead to excess strain on the worker's body and reduced productivity. This project seeks to develop an exoskeletal wrist fixture

Many industries require workers in warehouse and stockroom environments to perform frequent lifting tasks. Over time these repeated tasks can lead to excess strain on the worker's body and reduced productivity. This project seeks to develop an exoskeletal wrist fixture to be used in conjunction with a powered exoskeleton arm to aid workers performing box lifting types of tasks. Existing products aimed at improving worker comfort and productivity typically employ either fully powered exoskeleton suits or utilize minimally powered spring arms and/or fixtures. These designs either reduce stress to the user's body through powered arms and grippers operated via handheld controls which have limited functionality, or they use a more minimal setup that reduces some load, but exposes the user's hands and wrists to injury by directing support to the forearm. The design proposed here seeks to strike a balance between size, weight, and power requirements and also proposes a novel wrist exoskeleton design which minimizes stress on the user's wrists by directly interfacing with the object to be picked up. The design of the wrist exoskeleton was approached through initially selecting degrees of freedom and a ROM (range of motion) to accommodate. Feel and functionality were improved through an iterative prototyping process which yielded two primary designs. A novel "clip-in" method was proposed to allow the user to easily attach and detach from the exoskeleton. Designs utilized a contact surface intended to be used with dry fibrillary adhesives to maximize exoskeleton grip. Two final designs, which used two pivots in opposite kinematic order, were constructed and tested to determine the best kinematic layout. The best design had two prototypes created to be worn with passive test arms that attached to the user though a specially designed belt.

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Date Created
2016-12