Matching Items (6)

Encouraging Social Impact through a Connected Growth Platform

Description

For my Barrett the Honors College senior thesis project, I decided to utilize my knowledge of curriculum design to create a set of learning Modules. I was influenced by my

For my Barrett the Honors College senior thesis project, I decided to utilize my knowledge of curriculum design to create a set of learning Modules. I was influenced by my involvement in the Next Generation Service Corps to create these Modules around college student community impact. In the end I developed 6 Modules, each with 4-5 lessons and activities that focused on topics such as volunteerism, civic engagement, and meaningful careers. With interviews rolling through during the design process, I was able to iterate my design as I built it. The design was tested with 14 college students with positive feedback and engagement during the week-long period that it was available. Through this research and design, I found that such a collection of Modules could be beneficial to students to excite them about their potential and educate them about the opportunities that exist for them to take advantage of. This research could serve as a useful tool within the ASU community as an opportunity for the students to build up meaningful skills to create impact. ASU is passionate about education translating into real world applications and creating “changemakers”, and this collection has the opportunity to do just that.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Cookies 4 Change

Description

This thesis discusses our path toward creating Cookies 4 Change (C4C), a student organization at Arizona State University. This organization works in tandem with the Community School's Initiative (CSI) at

This thesis discusses our path toward creating Cookies 4 Change (C4C), a student organization at Arizona State University. This organization works in tandem with the Community School's Initiative (CSI) at Children's First Leadership Academy (CFLA), a school for housing insecure K-8 students in the valley. This mission of Cookies 4 Change is to mentor 7th and 8th grade students of the CSI program at Children's First Leadership Academy in life, in entrepreneurial endeavors, in academic pursuits, and in fundraising to illuminate future potential in both education and careers beyond. To fulfill this mission, we researched three main fields: volunteer motivation, self-esteem in the classroom, and curriculum. This research helped us to first determine the best way to structure our organization to keep ASU students engaged, second to build the self-esteem of the middle school students, and third to create sustainable curriculum on the topic of entrepreneurship. In addition, to ensure the sustainability of Cookies 4 Change, we are developing strong and committed members to take the reigns of the organization when we graduate. We have created detailed pass along documents to complement this thesis and assist them in running C4C. Lastly, we discuss the potential scalability of Cookies 4 Change as a concept to different underprivileged schools in the valley and other cities with a similar socioeconomic makeup. By delving further into our story, the research, the organization, the curriculum, our future, and the scalability, we hope to detail the work we have done to help these students and how the organization will continue helping after we are gone.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

Understanding Volunteer Motivations and Incentives for Retention in the Nonprofit Sector: Delivering Health and Hope to the World, One Super Sort at a Time

Description

Project C.U.R.E. is a nonprofit organization that delivers donated medical supplies and services to developing nations across the world. Currently, the Phoenix location has three full time employees, so a

Project C.U.R.E. is a nonprofit organization that delivers donated medical supplies and services to developing nations across the world. Currently, the Phoenix location has three full time employees, so a majority of the manual work is completed by episodic and long-term volunteers as well as semesterly interns. Volunteers are the backbone of the organization's daily productivity. Productivity among the Project C.U.R.E. warehouses varies greatly by location and is not directly related to the size of the warehouse. Productivity if hereby defined as as a warehouse's capability to meet the organization's goal of one container per week. Productivity can be increased or decreased based on the number of volunteers, funding, and catalogued inventory. Across all warehouses there is generally an overflow of donated equipment and consumable products, and therefore this is not usually a factor in productivity. In order to better understand why the Phoenix warehouse is the second most productive despite being the smallest, we researched how the motivations of volunteers. A survey was conducted to assess the motives of Project C.U.R.E.'s volunteers by quantifying their responses according to the Volunteerism Functional Inventory (VFI). The survey also produced information regarding volunteer demographics (ie. including gender, age, and occupation), as well as statistics about how often they volunteer at Project C.U.R.E. and their overall satisfaction with the organization. The data was then analyzed to determine the most relevant VFI characteristic. Upon analyzing the data, it was observed that the majority of participants were male (58.95%) and were between the ages of 18 and 25 (82.11%). The results also showed that Project C.U.R.E. utilizes a large number of episodic volunteers from Arizona State University (due to its close proximity to the Phoenix warehouse) was supported in that the data showed 72.63% of participants were undergraduate students and that 48.42% had just volunteered for their first time. After combining survey questions that corresponded to the same characteristic of volunteerism as outlined by Clary et al. (values, social, career, understanding, protective, and enhancement) the average of the responses was taken and used to determine the most relevant motives for our volunteer population. Based on the data, values (average score of 5.0) and understanding (average score of 5.0) were the two most relevant characteristics and protective (average score of 1.0) was the least relevant to volunteers. Additionally, 41.1% of survey respondents reported food would incentivize them to return to Project C.U.R.E. Additionally, 35.6% of survey respondents reported receiving Project C.U.R.E. merchandise would incentivize them to return in the future. Moving forward, it is recommended that the Project CURE Phoenix location begin providing their volunteers with merchandise and other forms of recognition based on the number of hours they committed to the organization.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Experimentation of managerial techniques for the optimization of a voluntary construction workforce

Description

Using experience, observations, data, current research, and writings in the field of volunteer management, it was determined there was a need to study the effects of leadership/management practices on the

Using experience, observations, data, current research, and writings in the field of volunteer management, it was determined there was a need to study the effects of leadership/management practices on the productivity outcomes of a volunteer construction workforce. A simple wood bench that would be tiled and painted was designed to test the areas of Time, Waste, Quality, Safety, and Satisfaction of different volunteer groups. The challenge was bolstered by giving the teams no power tools and limited available resources. A simple design of experiment model was used to test highs and lows in the three management techniques of Instruction, Help, and Encouragement. Each scenario was tested multiple times. Data was collected, normalized and analyzed using statistical analysis software. A few significant findings were discovered. The first; the research showed that there was no significant correlation between the management practices of the leader and the satisfaction of the volunteers. The second; the research also showed when further analyzed into specific realistic scenarios that the organizations would be better to focus on high amounts of Help and Encouragement in order to maximize the productivity of their volunteer construction workforce. This is significant as it allows NPO's and governments to focus their attention where best suited to produce results. The results were shared and the study was further validated as "significant" by conducting interviews with experts in the construction nonprofit sector.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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From beliefs to virtuous behaviors

Description

People may conceptualize God as benevolent and as authoritarian. This research investigates the influence of these God-concepts on prosocial behavior; specifically whether such concepts differentially predict a set of beliefs

People may conceptualize God as benevolent and as authoritarian. This research investigates the influence of these God-concepts on prosocial behavior; specifically whether such concepts differentially predict a set of beliefs about the self and the world, volunteer motivations, and intentions to volunteer for secular causes. Two studies, one correlation and one experimental, were conducted among college students who were Christians and indicated they believe that God exists. A measurement model of the concepts of Benevolent and Authoritarian God was first tested, and a conceptual path model was then analyzed. I found that concepts of a benevolent God were associated with a benevolent self-identity, perceived moral and religious obligations to help, and a high sense of personal responsibility with a total positive indirect effect on intentions to volunteer - mainly via internal motivations. In contrast, concepts of an authoritarian God were associated with a perceived religious obligation, having a positive indirect effect on intentions to volunteer via external motivations; but also with a low benevolent self-identity and low personal responsibility associated with amotivation (the disinclination to volunteer). Thus, there was a null total indirect effect of belief in an authoritarian God on intentions to volunteer. Future directions including the use of religious primes are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Building a Sense of Place Research Program: A Study of Conservation Volunteers in Scottsdale, Arizona

Description

This dissertation addresses empirical, applied, and theoretical issues in the place literature through an ethnographic study of the volunteer stewards in the nonprofit McDowell Sonoran Conservancy (Scottsdale, Arizona).

The first

This dissertation addresses empirical, applied, and theoretical issues in the place literature through an ethnographic study of the volunteer stewards in the nonprofit McDowell Sonoran Conservancy (Scottsdale, Arizona).

The first phase of study explores Conservancy stewards’ phenomenological place meanings through participant observation, a photovoice protocol (N=18), and life-history interviews (N=53). Findings indicate that being a steward fosters deep, identity-based place meanings within the conservation land (the McDowell Sonoran Preserve) and City of Scottsdale.

The second phase of study measures stewards’ psychometric place attachments to the Preserve and broader community using the Place Attachment Inventory (PAI) survey. New stewards’ (N=29) PAI scores—collected before attending orientation and one year after—demonstrate a rise in Preserve place attachment and place identity in the first year of service. Established stewards’ (N=275) PAI data suggests no correlation between place attachment and volunteer intensity. These findings are complemented by phase I results and suggest that stewards experience a rise in place identity after earning the identity of an environmental steward, regardless of engagement.

The third phase of study experimentally combines the data from established stewards who participated in phase I and II (N=48) to test the hypothesis that those with identity-based place meanings would possess higher place identity scores. Data analysis found no significant differences in place identity scores between those with and without a Predicted High Place Identity. The outcomes of this experiment suggest construct validity issues with the widely used place attachment and place identity constructs.

While it is established that volunteers arrive at an organization with a strong sense of place, this study demonstrates empirically how place attachments increase and place meanings deepen further after joining a volunteer organization. Communities and organizations can learn from the Conservancy’s practices that help stewards easily establish and perform a place-based steward identity. Finally, the experimental mixed methods findings suggest a sense of place research program that measures attachment to a place’s meanings rather than attachment to a place. This shift will allow place meaning and place attachment to be studied concurrently, advancing the sense of place construct and broader place theory.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020