Matching Items (15)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

Tell It to the Frogs: Fukushima’s nuclear disaster and its impact on the Japanese Tree Frog

Description

“Tell It to the Frogs: Fukushima’s nuclear disaster and its impact on the Japanese Tree Frog” is a representation of the work from Giraudeau et. al’s “Carotenoid distribution in wild Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) exposed to ionizing radiation in

“Tell It to the Frogs: Fukushima’s nuclear disaster and its impact on the Japanese Tree Frog” is a representation of the work from Giraudeau et. al’s “Carotenoid distribution in wild Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) exposed to ionizing radiation in Fukushima.” This paper looked to see if carotenoid levels in the tree frog’s vocal sac, liver, and blood were affected by radiation from Fukushima’s power plant explosion. Without carotenoids, the pigment that gives the frogs their orange color on their necks, their courtship practices would be impacted and would not be as able to show off their fitness to potential mates. The artwork inspired by this research displayed the tree frog’s degradation over time due to radiation, starting with normal life and ending with their death and open on the table. The sculptures also pinpoint where the carotenoids were being measured with a brilliant orange glaze. Through ceramic hand building, the artist created larger than life frogs in hopes to elicit curiosity about them and their plight. While the paper did not conclude any changes in the frog’s physiology after 18 months of exposure, there are still questions that are left unanswered. Why did these frogs not have any reaction? Could there be any effects after more time has passed? Is radiation leakage as big of a problem as previously thought? The only way to get the answers to these questions is to be aware of these amphibians, the circumstances that led them to be involved, and continued research on them and radiation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

The Interrelatedness of the Tarot and Hinduism: Communicating the Significance and Relevance of Tarot Archetypes with an Artistic Response through the Lens of Hindu Mythology

Description

The tarot is a means of communication with the world. It allows readers to interpret signs from their surroundings, gather information, and use this information to make inferences about a posed question. Its origins can be found in mid-15th century

The tarot is a means of communication with the world. It allows readers to interpret signs from their surroundings, gather information, and use this information to make inferences about a posed question. Its origins can be found in mid-15th century Europe as playing cards with four suits commonly used for gambling. Several hundred years later during the 18th century, it began to be used as a tool for divination; the Major Arcana, a set of 22 trump cards representing various archetypes, evolved as a supplement to a new tarot that has become associated with mysticism. The tarot’s foundation is based on archetypes that build society. It can serve as a visual lens to understand the experiences, thoughts, and actions of a person posing a question, allowing the reader to offer a solution by understanding and interpreting the specific visual language of a deck.
Hinduism is one of the oldest religions in the world and one of the most practiced today. It is full of fantastical myths and heroic legends, as well as undercurrents of feminism contrasted with misogyny and patriarchy. Hindu myths are contradictory as stories have evolved over time and have been retold with millions of differing perspectives.
In my thesis, I portrayed the 22 archetypes of the Major Arcana of the tarot through the lens of Hindu mythology as well as the broader pan-Indian culture. I include ancient stories and references to modern social issues. I visually communicated the connections between characters of Hindu mythology and the archetypes of the tarot with 22 watercolor paintings. This project was an opportunity to explore both the tarot through Hinduism, vice-versa. It allowed for the development of a deeper connection with spirituality and religion, along with a greater understanding of visual communication.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

147843-Thumbnail Image.png

Permanence and Impermanence in Global Art Traditions

Description

The aim of this creative project was to explore the ideas of impermanence and transience through the lens of different, largely non-western cultural backgrounds, and to incorporate what I learned into my own work as a painter. As part of

The aim of this creative project was to explore the ideas of impermanence and transience through the lens of different, largely non-western cultural backgrounds, and to incorporate what I learned into my own work as a painter. As part of this, I focused on the materials, techniques, visual strategies, and philosophies that guided the creation of these works. The project consisted of a discrete research phase, during which time I gathered information and materials related to my topic, and a creation phase, when I focused largely on the production of oil paintings and ink paintings whose technique and/or subject matter pertained to impermanence. Research for the most part was conducted by utilizing online and physical collections of work to analyze the formal elements of the work along with the cultural context in which it was created. Ultimately the creative project resulted in a product of three oil paintings and five ink paintings.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

131713-Thumbnail Image.png

What Our Bountiful Mother Earth Has Given Us

Description

The role of the artist is to push their field forward. Painting, an ancient
traditional practice, is constantly challenged by new ideas, technologies, societal
currents, and people. I believe it is my role to continue this

The role of the artist is to push their field forward. Painting, an ancient
traditional practice, is constantly challenged by new ideas, technologies, societal
currents, and people. I believe it is my role to continue this tradition and introduce
my interpretation of the disciple that is painting.
In this series titled “What Our Bountiful Mother Earth Has Given Us”, I
explore topics of materiality, sacrifice, and the relationship between artists, laborers,
and the Earth. I began this investigation with an adoration for fruit- the signal of a
successful harvest, the budding of fertile land. To capture this organic abundance, I
decided to use the actual pulp of the fruit to depict it. The sacrificial act of using the
flesh of the fruit created an artifact that strives to be, in the end, greater than the
sum of its’ parts. At its’ core, painting is the alchemy of combining natural elements.
To do so, I began by sourcing as much of my chosen fruit as possible,
specifically choosing fruits that require the labor of migrant farm workers in
California. I experimented with using tools such as a blender or food processor to
crush the fruit, but ultimately decided that using my hands and feet to pulverize the
fruit to a paintable pulp allowed me to experience being a component in the process.
Next, I reduced the liquid content by boiling it down to concentrated medium,
adding salt as a preservative measure. Testing out heavy canvases and thin
starched cottons, I eventually chose the lightest fabric I could find, cheesecloth, to
allow the medium to carry the weight of the piece, rather than the support. I
suspended this fabric between two easels and began painting my pulp concoction
onto both sides in multiple layers, allowing it to dry in between. I repeated this
process multiple times until the cloth became stiff and only a small amount of light
could filter through it. I began the same process using another fruit, until I had all
three completed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

Community, Collaboration, and Creativity: An Exploration of Original Characters

Description

How do you convey what’s interesting and important to you as an artist in a digital world of constantly shifting attentions? For many young creatives, the answer is original characters, or OCs. An OC is a character that an artist

How do you convey what’s interesting and important to you as an artist in a digital world of constantly shifting attentions? For many young creatives, the answer is original characters, or OCs. An OC is a character that an artist creates for personal enjoyment, whether based on an already existing story or world, or completely from their own imagination.
As creations made for purely personal interests, OCs are an excellent elevator pitch to talk one creative to another, opening up opportunities for connection in a world where communication is at our fingertips but personal connection is increasingly harder to make. OCs encourage meaningful interaction by offering themselves as muses, avatars, and story pieces, and so much more, where artists can have their characters interact with other creatives through many different avenues such as art-making, table top games, or word of mouth.

In this thesis, I explore the worlds and aesthetics of many creators and their original characters through qualitative research and collaborative art-making. I begin with a short survey of my creative peers, asking general questions about their characters and thoughts on OCs, then move to sketching characters from various creators. I focus my research to a group of seven core creators and their characters, whom I interview and work closely with in order to create a series of seven final paintings of their original characters.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

132399-Thumbnail Image.png

The Art of Healing

Description

Art is an ancient, personal, and cultural phenomenon used to convey human creativity and emotion. Dating back as early as 40,000 years in Indonesian cave paintings, this medium has been used to record stories, histories, and shape cultural opinion throughout

Art is an ancient, personal, and cultural phenomenon used to convey human creativity and emotion. Dating back as early as 40,000 years in Indonesian cave paintings, this medium has been used to record stories, histories, and shape cultural opinion throughout the history of mankind. While we have witnessed the rise and fall of types of art in popular culture and traditions, the core of art remains the same, which is to express the imagery within the human mind into a tangible form. As such, this allows for the candid acknowledgement and projection of an individual’s state of being into a productive, expressive skill which reaps therapeutic benefits.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

164506-Thumbnail Image.png

Chinese Landscapes in a New and Industrialized World

Description

Chinese landscape painting has a long history and is one of the most practiced traditions in Chinese art. There are many different styles within this genre, from the larger and bold style of the Northern Song dynasty to the smaller,

Chinese landscape painting has a long history and is one of the most practiced traditions in Chinese art. There are many different styles within this genre, from the larger and bold style of the Northern Song dynasty to the smaller, softer paintings of the Southern Song dynasty. Yang Yongliang is a contemporary Chinese artist that was born in 1980 in Shanghai, China. He was trained in traditional Chinese painting styles from a young age and, during his university schooling, he focused on digital art and graduated with a degree in Visual Communication. Yang combines these two distinct backgrounds in his art by creating pieces inspired by classical Chinese genres in a digital manner, using composite photographs. He creates different scenery by piecing small clips of pictures together to create one larger image. Yang takes the traditional style of work and changes it to comment on modern Chinese and global values. While many artists that focus on social or political messages create works that are not visually appealing, Yang has been able to create works that are powerful through their message while still being beautiful. Through his works, he successfully brings together both “New China” and “Old China” within every piece.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

Annihilation: A BFA Painting Exhibition

Description

This creative project examines identity, autonomy, and social hierarchy by manipulating the traditions and iconography of female figural painting. Female identity and autonomy is often marked by a tense relationship between the self and the body. Socially acceptable self-expression of

This creative project examines identity, autonomy, and social hierarchy by manipulating the traditions and iconography of female figural painting. Female identity and autonomy is often marked by a tense relationship between the self and the body. Socially acceptable self-expression of one's behavior, body, and desires is strictly regulated within a set of often paradoxical parameters that repress abject, 'animal' behaviors. This series of three paintings reacts to this culture of restraint and repression by exposing the body to nature once more, finding catharsis in annihilation and the destruction of boundaries between the Self and the Other. The human body is depicted as a host for animal life cycles, exploring the duality of creating and supporting life while simultaneously being destroyed. Animals that embody socially unacceptable behaviors are brought crashing back into the human form, reuniting the idealized, contrived female figure with an expressive, imperfect nature and sense of self. Hybridized animal-human relationships in the paintings break down the falsely hierarchical distinction between 'humans' and 'animals' that distances and privileges humanity from that which is considered primitive. By releasing the human body to the uncomplicated consumptive and reproductive forces of ‘trash’ animals in these paintings, the work challenges how the worth of existence is socially defined, instead affirming that all life has some inherent value distinct from its transactional worth to society at large. This celebration of the grotesque shakes off repressive social constructs, offering a unique form of catharsis and agency.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-12

Illustrations for "El Papalote Perdido"

Description

Working alongside book author Emilia Banuelos, I illustrated her children's book titled "El Papalote Perdido." Through a series of watercolor images, I depicted the story of a Mexican-American girl named Lucía and her lost kite, wandering through the Sonoran Desert

Working alongside book author Emilia Banuelos, I illustrated her children's book titled "El Papalote Perdido." Through a series of watercolor images, I depicted the story of a Mexican-American girl named Lucía and her lost kite, wandering through the Sonoran Desert in the Southwestern US. From rattlesnakes to tarantulas, saguaros to agaves, I painted all of the details that made this story so unique. Together, Emilia and I created a complete children's book that we plan to share with children throughout the valley by providing the book to local libraries and elementary schools.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

162313-Thumbnail Image.jpg

Annihilation #2: Leporidae

Description

This creative project examines identity, autonomy, and social hierarchy by manipulating the traditions and iconography of female figural painting. Female identity and autonomy is often marked by a tense relationship between the self and the body. Socially acceptable self-expression of

This creative project examines identity, autonomy, and social hierarchy by manipulating the traditions and iconography of female figural painting. Female identity and autonomy is often marked by a tense relationship between the self and the body. Socially acceptable self-expression of one's behavior, body, and desires is strictly regulated within a set of often paradoxical parameters that repress abject, 'animal' behaviors. This series of three paintings reacts to this culture of restraint and repression by exposing the body to nature once more, finding catharsis in annihilation and the destruction of boundaries between the Self and the Other. The human body is depicted as a host for animal life cycles, exploring the duality of creating and supporting life while simultaneously being destroyed. Animals that embody socially unacceptable behaviors are brought crashing back into the human form, reuniting the idealized, contrived female figure with an expressive, imperfect nature and sense of self. Hybridized animal-human relationships in the paintings break down the falsely hierarchical distinction between 'humans' and 'animals' that distances and privileges humanity from that which is considered primitive. By releasing the human body to the uncomplicated consumptive and reproductive forces of ‘trash’ animals in these paintings, the work challenges how the worth of existence is socially defined, instead affirming that all life has some inherent value distinct from its transactional worth to society at large. This celebration of the grotesque shakes off repressive social constructs, offering a unique form of catharsis and agency.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-12