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Click-and-Mortar: The Role of In-Store Experience and Branding as Touchpoints in the Consumer Journey

Description

With brick-and-mortar retail actively under threat from a growing e-commerce market, companies are being challenged to re-evaluate the way they engage with their customers in the physical realm. Companies are under pressure to give consumers a reason to make a

With brick-and-mortar retail actively under threat from a growing e-commerce market, companies are being challenged to re-evaluate the way they engage with their customers in the physical realm. Companies are under pressure to give consumers a reason to make a trip to their stores over succumbing to the convenience of sitting at home in their pajamas and shopping online. Because of the rapid development of e-commerce, there is a growing necessity for retailers to prove their worth by means of marketing the in-store experience as superior to that of what online could offer. Brands are navigating the grey area between the digital and physical realms in order to successfully fulfill the needs of the modern consumer through viewing these different entities as touchpoints in the overall consumer experience.

This study explores the connection between the interior design of retail spaces and consumer behavior in the direct-to-consumer environment. The research explores the relationships between consumer behavior, intangible brand identity, and the physical (brick-and-mortar) retail environment and explores interior design’s role in the development of a new form of retail found in brands whose presence began online and later entered the physical realm. Through analyzing store aesthetics, consumer preferences, and purchasing behavior, this research provides insight into what matters to consumers in a direct-to-consumer retail environment and how designers at the forefront of this movement are adapting, and ultimately draws conclusions about how companies can utilize interior design and store aesthetics as part of the consumer journey to maximize the impact of their brand experiences.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Strategic Brand Portfolio Management: Brand Leveraging and the Importance of Mitigating Brand Dilution Risks in the Golf Equipment Industry

Description

The Golf Equipment Industry is flooded with many competitors, all looking to expand and grow with their various customer bases. In an industry which demands rapid new-product developments and offerings, companies must position their various brands in a way that

The Golf Equipment Industry is flooded with many competitors, all looking to expand and grow with their various customer bases. In an industry which demands rapid new-product developments and offerings, companies must position their various brands in a way that appeals to both current and future customers. In tailoring product offerings and leveraging existing brand equity, effectively manipulating brand portfolios, companies must assess the risk of brand dilution effects when fulfilling company-wide growth initiatives. The following project will present research-based marketing principles with marketplace examples from various industries; specifically looking at marketers’ strategies in manipulating brand portfolios through the use of brand architectures, upward/downward line stretches, and brand extensions. Essentially, this paper will present the importance of manipulating brand portfolios in a variety of industries (including the golf industry), exciting current and new customer bases, eventually establishing an understanding of the risks associated with each leveraging strategy.
With a deep emphasis on the criticality of mitigating brand dilution whilst manipulating product offerings, this paper will then provide a golf-specific industry trend analysis, diving into the various ways marketers at TaylorMade Golf, Callaway Golf, and Cleveland/Srixon/XXIO Golf leverage brand equity while mitigating brand dilution risks. With a greater understanding of marketing-theory based principles and research conducted on the current customer trends prevalent in the golf industry, supplemented by marketing-personnel survey responses, I will be able to translate branding-based principles into recommendations for companies competing in the golf equipment industry.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Transforming Reputation in Higher Education

Description

There are over 4,000 higher education institutions in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics. With a variety of options at an applicant’s disposal, the competition for institutions to attract their desired student body can be fierce.

There are over 4,000 higher education institutions in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics. With a variety of options at an applicant’s disposal, the competition for institutions to attract their desired student body can be fierce. Some factors many consider when searching for the perfect college are its reputation and brand. Increasingly, universities have chosen to engage in marketing and branding techniques once reserved for corporations. According to a report by the Santa Clara Consulting Group, “a university is no longer just an institution of higher learning but also a business.” In coordination with this growing trend, institutions have been propelled to undergo some extent of a transformation to achieve their goals. This paper examines three institutions representing different higher education categories that have undergone or are currently undergoing some extent of a reputational shift. Looking at a large public university, an Ivy League institution and a liberal arts college, the research explores the various communications efforts made by each institution and how they compare. In some cases, the communications department is an integral component of the shift, while sometimes it provides mostly auxiliary support. Ultimately, this research hopes to provide insight into the following questions: what actions can an institution’s communications department take to help strengthen its reputation and grow its brand; and how do these strategies compare among various types of institutions?

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Consumer Perceptions and Behavioral Effects of Multi-Channel Product Sets in the Specialty Apparel Retail Industry

Description

As firms increase the number of channels that they operate and distribute their products and services on, they run into new challenges with branding. One sub-industry where many firms have used multi-channel branding is the specialty apparel segment of retail.

As firms increase the number of channels that they operate and distribute their products and services on, they run into new challenges with branding. One sub-industry where many firms have used multi-channel branding is the specialty apparel segment of retail. Many firms of this kind are using a four-channel approach with physical stores, brand websites, social media pages, and direct mail catalogs to market their products. Yet, there are few specialty apparel retailers that do this well across all four channels. A particular technique used to market products in this way is visual merchandising. Visual merchandising for apparel products pieces together full outfits with multiple clothing items and shows them, in some way, being worn. Beyond just marketing products, however, visual merchandising can provide firms with benefits of branding such as brand expertise, positive consumer attitudes, and increased consumer purchase intent. To do this, firms must develop quality brands using traditional branding practices. To use as guides, J. Crew and Anthropologie's branding and visual merchandising practices were analyzed in case studies. Testing consumer perceptions of these brands and their success, primary research about consumers' behavior relative to specialty apparel retail brands and their visual merchandising displays was an outcome. From this research, it was found that consumers best respond to in-store visual merchandising displays. In showing products, a variety product combination strategy is preferred as it enhances the value consumers perceive in brands and builds brand character. Consumers also feel that visual merchandising impacts their knowledge of the brand and its products as well as personal styling. If brands successfully use visual merchandising to brand themselves, brand consistency, brand expertise, and positive consumer attitudes are an outcome. Recommendations for specialty apparel retail brands have been developed using these findings, and the potential such firms are able to realize in using these will greatly benefit them.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Manipulation! How Spokespeople Affect Brands and Their Consumers

Description

Advertising has been a part of the marketing landscape for decades, evolving over time. Among the many tactics of advertising is the use of spokespeople, or brand personalities, that represent a brand and its offerings. Spokespeople have been around as

Advertising has been a part of the marketing landscape for decades, evolving over time. Among the many tactics of advertising is the use of spokespeople, or brand personalities, that represent a brand and its offerings. Spokespeople have been around as early as the 1950s, with brands hiring well-known actors and actresses to represent everyday products. Since then, they have evolved to be more than just a brand representative. Fast forward to the 21st century, spokespeople have developed symbiotic relationships with brands, helping them create authentic connections with its consumers.

There are many successful cases of spokespeople enhancing a brand’s popularity and growing their sales, but what would happen to the brand if their spokesperson engaged in controversial behavior? The basis of this thesis, and my research, revolves around this research objective: to better understand if, and how, spokespeople affect a brand and its consumers. I conducted primary research in the form of a survey to test consumer’s attitudes and behaviors towards brands and spokespeople; additionally, I conducted secondary research to understand how spokespeople can impact a brand’s stock and sales performance. I expect spokespeople with high levels of association with the brands they represent to have a strong affect on a brand’s performance and perception.

The results of my research defy my expectations. Spokespeople that have a weaker association level with their brands had a strong affect on a brand and its consumers, and vice-versa with strong association levels. In the primary research, spokespeople with weak association levels with Nike and Papa John’s had a significant impact on how participants viewed and engaged with the brands. In addition, secondary research indicates there are significant affects on a brand’s performance as a result of the spokespeople, despite the weak association levels.

After conducting research, I concluded that to have effective spokespeople that can positively impact a brand and its consumers, they must possess two characteristics: trustworthiness and authenticity. The successful cases of spokespeople from my primary and secondary research possessed these characteristics. Consumers need to be able to trust the messages that come from spokespeople, and they need to be able to understand that the relationship between the them and the brand is authentic and makes sense. Therefore, if the spokespeople brands hire are trustworthy and authentic to the brand, then they will positively impact the performance and perception of the brand.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

Understanding Branding and Consumer Perception as it Relates to the Political and Social Climate

Description

This report was commissioned to provide an analysis and evaluation of consumer perceptions and branding as it relates to the political and social climate in America. To be able to do this, the paper analyzes shifts in the external environment

This report was commissioned to provide an analysis and evaluation of consumer perceptions and branding as it relates to the political and social climate in America. To be able to do this, the paper analyzes shifts in the external environment as well as researching case studies and online consumer perception surveys. Overall, this paper aims to examine the distributed survey and attempt to correlate and identify how branding, consumer perceptions, and social and political issues all can work and affect one another. Through the administration of this survey, we were able to formulate a conclusion that points towards the importance of brands actively adhering to changing consumer preferences, ideals, and expectations. The research draws attention to the fact that brands are now living in polarized times, in which there can be numerous risks and opportunities for taking a particular stance socially or politically (Kleinberg, 2017). Thoroughly understanding and measuring brand customer perception in regards social and political stance can be vital to the future success or demise of a brand. To further understand consumer perceptions, it is imperative to analyze the opinions and information of the demographics in which brands appeal to. They can have differing opinions on the subject matter, therefore brands must be sensitive to these differences, and make changes accordingly. Moreover, analyzing current advertising campaigns are essential in gauging the overall expectation that consumers have for their brands in relation to current political and social climates. In essence, these questions and studies led us to formulate our final recommendations pertaining to this subject. Therefore, it is recommended: Brands should consider the political ideology in which the majority of their consumer base identifies with in order to leverage consumer purchasing power Brands should institute protocols before officially releasing proactive or reactive ad campaigns, such as brand advisory committees, competent spokesmen, issue based ads By utilizing this information, it allows brands to be proactive and refocus their objectives in order to accommodate varying consumer perceptions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

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I Am Not A MIllennial

Description

I Am Not A Millennial is an honors thesis project that combines research with a creative application to determine the best practices for companies and advertising agencies. The thesis consists of three main sections: an overview of what a millennial

I Am Not A Millennial is an honors thesis project that combines research with a creative application to determine the best practices for companies and advertising agencies. The thesis consists of three main sections: an overview of what a millennial is, bursting the millennial hype bubble, and discussion of whether new targeting techniques, new ideas for content, or new ways of advertising are necessary to engage the Millennial consumer. The thesis will first look at the Millennial Generation to answer the question of "Who are they?" with the emphasis on removing the negative stereotypes from the Millennial generation. This section will be supported by the following section which will discuss the lack of statistical information that truly separates the Millennial generation from its predecessors. Finally, by presenting information on my experiences leading a student-run advertising non profit, case studies, and working within an account management department of an advertising agency, this thesis will present conclusions that advertising agencies and businesses need to develop targeting and content practices that focus in on consumers' interests and tell the story of "why" in order to connect with Millennials.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05

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Getting Personal: Utilizing Branding Strategies for Individuals

Description

Branding is one of the most important tools a business can use. Whether consumers know it or not, every purchasing decision that they make – be it for a product or service – is rooted in the brand.

Branding is one of the most important tools a business can use. Whether consumers know it or not, every purchasing decision that they make – be it for a product or service – is rooted in the brand. Thus, it is somewhat of a surprise that branding for individuals did not become popularized until 1997, with Tom Peters’ article “The Brand Called You.” In his article, Peters remarks on how changes in the marketplace and technology make developing a personal brand more accessible, as well as more important. The increasingly competitive marketplace combined with the rise of social media means that personal branding is even more important and more attainable today. Thus, it is vital for students entering the workforce to develop a brand that will allow them to distinguish themselves. This research examines whether or not students understand what personal branding is and if they have taken the steps to develop their personal brand. The research questions are as follows:
• Do students understand what personal branding is?
• Are students able to define their skills?
• Do students have a career plan?
• Do students have a plan to promote their brand?

A pilot study was first distributed to students of Arizona State University which found that students lack an understanding of what personal branding is and have a need for the knowledge and tools to develop a personal brand. A workshop was then developed to address these issues. This workshop was held three times: first, for a Landscape Architecture class, second, for a marketing class, and third, for a student sales organization. The workshop discussed branding, personal branding, and then the participants were able to begin working on developing their own personal brand. The students in the first workshop had two sessions and were able to complete their own personal brand process with the workshop leader, while participants from the second and third workshops completed it on their own, after only a single workshop session. After completing the in-person workshop, participants shared their brand with their fellow students in a Google Plus page. Finally, participants completed an exit survey. This exit survey was used to measure the research questions.

The first workshop proved to be most effective, even though the participants in the first workshop were all landscape design students and the majority of the participants in the second and third workshops were business students. It was found that unless the students’ own brand development process was finished during the workshop or affected the students’ grade, it would not be completed. It was also evident in all of the workshops that slides with imagery were more effective at starting discussions than the text-heavy slides. As such, future workshops should be designed with a greater time allowance, the intent of the students’ own brand development process to be completed during the workshop, and the presentation should be redesigned to better initiate discussion among participants.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-12

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Innovation Space: A Primal Branding Framework

Description

Innovation Space is a course designed to challenge senior students to collaborate on an interdisciplinary basis while completing a thought-provoking project. Each project is designed to allow students to address real-world issues. My team, Leverage, has created a product suite

Innovation Space is a course designed to challenge senior students to collaborate on an interdisciplinary basis while completing a thought-provoking project. Each project is designed to allow students to address real-world issues. My team, Leverage, has created a product suite for power wheelchair users. Our product suite equips a wheelchair with a backup camera, an expanding lap desk, and a headrest with integrated Bluetooth speakers and microphone. These products are designed to increase the productive potential of the disabled, particularly quadriplegics injured around the C4 vertebra level. During the course of the program, my team will create physical prototypes of our product and I will create a full business plan. The individual written portion of my thesis will consist of discussion of a branding framework developed by creative director Patrick Hanlon. In addition, I will suggest methodology for effectively branding our company.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

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How corporations should respond to a public health or social crisis

Description

A guide to implementing empathy in crisis communications

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05