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Best Practices for Teaching Argument Writing in Secondary Schools

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This honors thesis outlines a method for teaching argument writing in the secondary classroom, including the elements of an argument based upon the Toulmin method, and diverse ways to help students who are all types of learners become engaged and

This honors thesis outlines a method for teaching argument writing in the secondary classroom, including the elements of an argument based upon the Toulmin method, and diverse ways to help students who are all types of learners become engaged and receive the support they need. It includes all elements of argument, including evidence, warrants, backing, counterargument, claims, theses, the rhetorical triangle and the rhetorical appeals, including definitions and how they fit together in an argumentative essay. The largest portion of the project is dedicated to activities and resources for teachers based upon all of those elements, along with activities for the writing process as a whole. These activities are based upon the student's individual experience as well as various scholarly resources from leading professionals in the curriculum development field for English Language Arts. This is not meant to be an end-all be-all solution for teaching argument writing, but rather one of many resources that teachers can use in their classroom. This 30-page paper, including references, are condensed into an accessible website for teachers to use more easily. Each tab on the website refers to a different element or focus of the argument writing process, with both a definition and introduction as well as one or more activities for teachers to implement into the classroom. The activities are versatile and general for the purpose of teachers being able to include them into whatever curriculum they are currently teaching. The goal is that they can add argument instruction into what they are already either willingly or being required to teach in an easy and logical way. The website is available for any secondary teachers to use as they see fit at www.teachingargumentwriting.weebly.com.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Dearest (∞), an Original Novel Work

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Each part of the book is written from a different relative, literarily-inclined perspective. The portion of this submission that captures what my experience as a Barrett student has lended to my approved manuscript (by Dorrance Publishing Co.) lies with the

Each part of the book is written from a different relative, literarily-inclined perspective. The portion of this submission that captures what my experience as a Barrett student has lended to my approved manuscript (by Dorrance Publishing Co.) lies with the excerpted material from Part IV. Below is the table of contents for the novel work itself, as well as the styles of writing assumed per part.

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Date Created
2017-05

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The Classroom Where it Happens: A Unit in Secondary English

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My topic is derived from my field of study of English, Secondary Education and will focus on the integration of the hit Broadway musical 'Hamilton: An American Musical' into a secondary education English curriculum. My compelling question is: How does

My topic is derived from my field of study of English, Secondary Education and will focus on the integration of the hit Broadway musical 'Hamilton: An American Musical' into a secondary education English curriculum. My compelling question is: How does 'Hamilton' affect diverse students’ perspectives on their individual potential? It is my belief that students will be changed after seeing the show, that they will feel empowered by the unique representation and modern casting of the musical. There is so much to learn from 'Hamilton' and its effects on the affective domain of learning. My interest in this topic lies not only in musical theatre and education, but more specifically in the intersection of the two. It is through the intentional casting decisions and strategic musical arrangements of 'Hamilton' that students will be impacted — decisions and arrangements that challenge all preconceived notions about musical theatre and American history. Having seen 'Hamilton' twice now, and having been equally moved each time, I am able to conceptualize the emotions of a diverse student body as they experience the show in any capacity. Seeing four of the most prominent men in American history in a room together, represented as men of color is powerful. Seeing sisters love and support each other despite their various skin colors and hair textures is powerful. Seeing children that don’t look like their parents is powerful. Hearing American history recounted through hip-hop verse is powerful. Casting the story of American-then as America-now is powerful. The main goal of my thesis is to help young, diverse minds understand that they have a voice, that they are important, that they can be anything they want to be. Young audience members see themselves represented in the diversity presented onstage in 'Hamilton,' an experience that is unique to the production of this musical. Through the lessons and curriculum I design, students will be able to measure what they believed about themselves and their situations before experiencing 'Hamilton,' and how those beliefs about themselves may have changed as a result of experiencing this life-changing show.

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Date Created
2018-12

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Literature in the Classroom: What Instructional Practices Foster Improved Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking Skills?

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The purpose of this study is to determine the types of classroom instructional activities commonly used in teaching literature. Data were collected at ASU Preparatory High School. The study determined that literature-based lessons and activities fall under three categories: reading,

The purpose of this study is to determine the types of classroom instructional activities commonly used in teaching literature. Data were collected at ASU Preparatory High School. The study determined that literature-based lessons and activities fall under three categories: reading, writing, and discussion. Classroom observations revealed that reading, writing, and discursive activities were designed to promote higher-ordering thinking. These activities included silent reading, annotating text, reading aloud, keeping reading response journals, practicing essay writing, and participating in Socratic discussion. The teachers at ASU Prep used the listed activities with the intent to challenge their English students to engage in active learning, to improve reading, writing, and discursive skills, and promote critical thinking skills.

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Date Created
2015-05