Matching Items (5)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

134444-Thumbnail Image.png

Filling a Body That's Yours: a Consideration of Identity, Queerness, and Mental Illness

Description

"Filling a Body That's Yours" is a collection of poetry that celebrates queer survival and the fluidity and mutability of identity. The poems arise from personal experience and expand to the universal in order to question and critique constructs of

"Filling a Body That's Yours" is a collection of poetry that celebrates queer survival and the fluidity and mutability of identity. The poems arise from personal experience and expand to the universal in order to question and critique constructs of mental illness, queerness, transness, and identity. Via intuitive imagistic shifts, unexpected language, and urgent vulnerability, the poems share a personal account of mental illness and treatment, and set out to critique the mental health industrial complex and shortcomings in language, psychiatry, and psychology. For this project, the collection of poems is coupled with a written analytical component that discusses the personal and theoretical backgrounds for the work, as well as poetics and influences. The essay specifically addresses three main themes that appear in the poems: queerness/gender, mental illness and treatment, and identity, using theorists such as Judith Butler and David Hume. Further, the essay provides personal background for the work and discusses poetic influences such as Sylvia Plath, Li-Young Lee, Claudia Rankine, and Norman Dubie. Both the poems and the essay, while addressing these themes, attempt to ask and examine questions such as: "Is my gender entirely mine? Was it thrust wholly or in part upon me? Do I choose to claim queerness, or is it innate?" In asking these questions, the poems challenge readers to consider how they came to understand their bodies as gendered, and what political ends their identities may serve. Ultimately, the poems and their theoretical counterparts complicate constructs we commonly accept as essential givens, and meditate upon timeless existential questions in new, visceral ways.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

132334-Thumbnail Image.png

A New Perspective on Homelessnss

Description

According to a Washington Post and YouGov study conducted in 2014, 60% of
the 861 U.S. citizens surveyed supported aid and subsidized housing for the homeless
Population. Of that same survey group, however, 52% and 46% supported banning panhandling
and

According to a Washington Post and YouGov study conducted in 2014, 60% of
the 861 U.S. citizens surveyed supported aid and subsidized housing for the homeless
Population. Of that same survey group, however, 52% and 46% supported banning panhandling
and sleeping in public, respectively. This disconnect highlights how we as Americans view
homelessness: people who are on the fringes of society that deserve help, but only from a
distance. This creative project is a book of twenty poems in which each poem will correspond
aspects of the homeless experience. This project also serves to make the homeless population
more relatable to the general population, bring a voice to a marginalized population who are not
heard or helped, and bring about better resources for the homeless population.
The project was completed in stages. First interviews with homeless individuals were
conducted and questions such as “What is your passion?” and “What three words would you best
describe homelessness as?” A special effort was made to make sure that the thoughts and
feelings of the homeless individuals were presented without bias. The book was then put together
as a manuscript. An analytics paper was also prepared that discussed the background of the
problem, influences on poetry, and challenges throughout the process. A presentation on the
process was also prepared for the thesis defense.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

134739-Thumbnail Image.png

The Seed: A Historical Study of Poetic Methods for God-talk

Description

In our radically diverse world, individuals cling to their unique values and beliefs dearly, and these beliefs drive their actions and have a significant influence on their worldview. Many people derive their beliefs from religious traditions and the beliefs of

In our radically diverse world, individuals cling to their unique values and beliefs dearly, and these beliefs drive their actions and have a significant influence on their worldview. Many people derive their beliefs from religious traditions and the beliefs of their ancestors that have trickled down throughout cultures over thousands of years. Some of these beliefs are adhered to so strictly that openness and love for people that do not hold the same beliefs is neglected, and as a result we see the manifestations of hate between cultures running rampant in today's world. However, as a human race we all came from one point of origin, or "seed". In this paper, the author posits that this "seed" arose from some divine power. The author does not seek to identify or name this divine source, only to support the idea that there is a common, spiritual origin to the human race through the examination of three diverse groups, or units, of texts. A supporting topic of this paper is the use of creative forms of language, such as poetry, to describe the spiritual "seed" of humankind. The first unit examines the pre-Christ texts of Plato and Neoplatonists. The second unit is built on Early Eastern texts like the Upanishads. The third and final unit is an analysis of mystical thinkers of the medieval ages. Finally, a conclusion follows that supports the original thesis of a common, divine origin by drawing similarities between these diverse readings.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12