Matching Items (22)

141345-Thumbnail Image.png

A Field Study of a Comprehensive Violence Risk Assessment Battery.

Description

We used archival data to examine the predictive validity of a pre-release violence risk assessment battery over six years at a forensic hospital (N=230, 100% male, 63.0% African-American, 34.3% Caucasian).

We used archival data to examine the predictive validity of a pre-release violence risk assessment battery over six years at a forensic hospital (N=230, 100% male, 63.0% African-American, 34.3% Caucasian). Examining “real world” forensic decision-making is important for illuminating potential areas for improvement. The battery included the Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20, Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, Schedule of Imagined Violence, and Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory. Three outcome “recidivism” variables included contact violence, contact & threatened violence, and any reason for hospital return. Results indicated measures of general violence risk and psychopathy were highly correlated but weakly associated with reports of imagined violence and a measure of anger. Measures of imagined violence and anger were correlated with one another. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses revealed, unexpectedly, that none of the scales or subscales predicted recidivism better than chance. Multiple regression indicated the battery failed to account for recidivism outcomes. We conclude by discussing three possible explanations, including timing of assessments, controlled versus field studies, and recidivism base rates.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-03-13

135096-Thumbnail Image.png

Insect Girls: Poems

Description

Insect Girls is a chapbook-length collection of poems exploring the human inclination toward, and desire for, violence. Using insects and other bugs as motifs to show how people can often

Insect Girls is a chapbook-length collection of poems exploring the human inclination toward, and desire for, violence. Using insects and other bugs as motifs to show how people can often be treated like insects, these 25 poems complicate the relationships between violent people and their victims. The collection specifically focuses on women's issues such as domestic violence and female sexuality. The speakers range from a prostitute waiting in the rain, to a submissive girl at a fetish party, to a housewife with a werewolf for a husband. Violence and sex are depicted as inherently intertwined. Because of this, many characters in the book show a connection between desire and violence, how cruelty can have a kind of sex appeal. This is explored in the collection with depictions of sadomasochism and BDSM, where power dynamics can be at certain times problematic, and at others, beautiful. In writing these poems, I was inspired by the fact that upon seeing a harmless bug, so many people's first instinct is to crush it, for no reason at all except because they can. Bug imagery appears throughout the collection, illustrating the dehumanizing aspect of cruelty. The capture of a butterfly serves as a metaphor for sexual assault, and elsewhere bee wings show a desire for escape. Imagery as a whole is important to the collection because it illustrates not only the physical scars that result from violent actions, but also the strength and loveliness within the survivors. In Insect Girls, I didn't want to hide away ugliness, but I didn't want to hide away beauty either.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

133196-Thumbnail Image.png

Honor, Glory, Sacrifice, and Annihilation: Violence and Death in World War II

Description

Civilian publics at large internalize death and killing in wartime as a given; after all, what is war if not fighting and dying? There exist popularized notions of “rules of

Civilian publics at large internalize death and killing in wartime as a given; after all, what is war if not fighting and dying? There exist popularized notions of “rules of war,” as put by a 2014 BBC ethics piece that accepted the notion “that soldiers must be prepared to put their own lives at risk in order to limit civilian casualties.” Here there is no denial that combatants kill and die in war. Yet in another sense, the public sanitizes the permanent reality of death and killing—it constructs careful euphemisms and erects psychological barriers that allow the perpetuation of violence without emotionally confronting the brutal reality of the battlefield. In spite of such concentrated cultural efforts at reconceptualization of death and killing, however, the soldiers and combatants who actually engage in this behavior irrevocably come face-to-face with the reality of death and killing in wartime. It is the “[i]ntimate acts of killing in war,” such as those “committed by historical subjects imbued with language, emotion, and desire” that necessarily challenge and threaten culturally-constructed sterilized preconceptions of deadly violence; still, as Joanna Bourke argues, “[k]illing in wartime is inseparable from wider social and cultural concerns.”

To this end, a war that involves not only the physical intimacy of killing but also mortal struggles between cultures and ideologies arguably complicates the extent to and manner by which individual combatants engage in such behavior. No war fulfills these criteria so cleanly as World War II—it was a conflict that cost more people their lives than any war before, and as a global conflict, it brought vastly differing perspectives of death and killing to the battlefield. World War II represented not simply a struggle for national-ideological survival (though that it clearly was), but more importantly a struggle for the retention of the self through identity.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

131467-Thumbnail Image.png

Elder Abuse: Issues and Remediation

Description

The topic of elder abuse is relatively unknown and not talked about among the general public. Traditionally, society values one’s life the younger that person is on the grounds that

The topic of elder abuse is relatively unknown and not talked about among the general public. Traditionally, society values one’s life the younger that person is on the grounds that the younger person has most likely not experienced life to the fullest extent as much as the older person has. The point of bringing up this way of thinking is not to refute it but to point out that a product of this societal mindset is that the elderly population is often forgotten about or placed on a lower priority level when considering medical and safety issues. This is a major factor that contributes to the vulnerability of older persons, who often must give up their autonomy due to the aging process and learn to live while being dependent on a caretaker. Elders are often in situations where they are isolated from the rest of the world and place their trust in their caretakers to help them live out the rest of their lives. Unfortunately, the process of aging and becoming dependent opens up the opportunity for this vulnerable age group to be taken advantage of and abused. The National Council on Aging reported that about 1 in 10 elderly Americans that are 60 years old or older have been abused in some capacity, and only about 1 in 14 of these cases are reported (NCOA, 2020). As the world population ages, these statistics face the risk of getting worse and exposing more elders to abuse while less and less abuse cases are reported to authorities. This presents the opportunity for elder abuse research to guide healthcare institutions that are related to caring for the elderly on how to care for and prevent elder abuse from occurring; however, this research is quite limited in comparison to the research, treatments, and prevention programs developed for other types of domestic abuse. The aim of this paper is to create an overall understanding of elder abuse as a whole and get a sense of the state of elder abuse so recommendations can be made on how to proceed in bettering the current issues elder abuse faces.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

148158-Thumbnail Image.png

War Trauma in American Literature

Description

This project is a critical analysis of the works of 6 American war veterans and how they demonstrate trauma in their narratives. The texts covered here are Philip Red

This project is a critical analysis of the works of 6 American war veterans and how they demonstrate trauma in their narratives. The texts covered here are Philip Red Eagle’s Red Earth (2007), John A. Williams’ Captain Blackman (1972), Roy Scranton’s War Porn (2016), Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried (1990), Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five (1969), and Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 (1961).

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

137158-Thumbnail Image.png

For Adults Only: Changes in the Perception of the NC-17 Rating in the Era of Responsible Entertainment

Description

This thesis examines the changes that have occurred in the way the average American regards films carrying the NC-17 rating since 2007, when Dr. Kevin Sandler's book The Naked Truth:

This thesis examines the changes that have occurred in the way the average American regards films carrying the NC-17 rating since 2007, when Dr. Kevin Sandler's book The Naked Truth: Why Hollywood Doesn't Make X-Rated Movies was published. In The Naked Truth, Sandler coins the phrase "responsible entertainment," referring to the Hollywood industry's standard of avoiding making, distributing and exhibiting films that carry the NC-17 rating. The mainstream film industry's commitment to responsible entertainment goes back to the creation of the movie rating system in 1968; since that time, adults-only movies have been stigmatized and ghettoized from the rest of mainstream film. However, since Sandler's analysis of the NC-17 rating in 2007, there have been notable changes in parents' attitudes about what is acceptable for their kids, as well as in the public's attitude about movie ratings; in addition, the general political climate of the country as a whole has evolved. This raises the question, is the era of responsible entertainment coming to an end? This thesis examines the four significant NC-17 films to be theatrically released since the publication of Sandler's work--Lust, Caution (2007), Shame (2011), Killer Joe (2012) and Blue Is the Warmest Color (2013)--in an effort to analyze the cultural and political catalysts that have led to these changes in the perception of the MPAA's most restrictive movie rating. In doing so, it may be possible to determine what the future holds for NC-17 movies, how they are released, and how the public will perceive them.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

137513-Thumbnail Image.png

How Native Americans in the Eastern Woodlands Conceptualize Violence

Description

An anthropological study of Eastern Woodland Native American viewpoints on humans hunting animals, interspecies animal predation, violence between animals of the same species, and violence among humans within tribes, and

An anthropological study of Eastern Woodland Native American viewpoints on humans hunting animals, interspecies animal predation, violence between animals of the same species, and violence among humans within tribes, and violence among humans between tribes, and how Native Americans conceptualize the relationships among these beliefs. I do not seek to provide an explanation as to why their worldview is the way it is, but to explore the relationship between these perspectives in Native American mindsets. Though some of these violent relationships have been extensively studied, an exploration of how Native Americans view all violent interactions and how these viewpoints relate to each other has not been attempted. In each of the five relationship categories outlined above, the acceptability of certain kinds of violence varies greatly. My goal is to find the patterns of behaviors and reasoning behind them \u2014 why is a certain type of violence acceptable in one kind of relationship but not another?

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

132185-Thumbnail Image.png

The Good Ghanaian Wife: Patriarchal Ideologies and Its Impact on the Widespread of Violence Against Women and Girls in Ghana

Description

Violence against women is perhaps the most shameful human- rights violation. And it is perhaps the most pervasive. It knows no boundaries of geography, culture or wealth.
~ Kofi

Violence against women is perhaps the most shameful human- rights violation. And it is perhaps the most pervasive. It knows no boundaries of geography, culture or wealth.
~ Kofi Annan, Seventh United Nations Secretary-General

The Ghanaian culture is deeply entrenched with patriarchal beliefs and ideologies. Male supremacy is widespread throughout all spheres of life. Patriarchy ideologies in Ghana ascribe the qualities of a good wife and constrain the possibilities for girls and women. Furthermore, the doctrines of patriarchy in Ghana contribute to the state of violence. There are various forms of violence faced by Ghanaian women such as domestic violence, social violence, psychological violence, physical violence, economic violence, and sexual abuse. Women are not empowered to be independent with the capacity to defend their human rights. Men occupy most of the leadership positions hence making the critical decisions further propagating patriarchy.
Additionally, the attitudes by women accepting the patriarchal culture as the norm justify men to continue the bad habits that discriminate against women. The prevalence of violence is high with one in every three women experiencing some form of violence in Ghana. The Ghanaian Government has made significant strides in fighting violence by enacting the domestic violence act of 2007. The bill has created a platform through which victims of abuse can access justice. This paper will argue that violence against women and girls in Ghana is deeply ingrained in the culture that it has become normalized and for changes to be made, Ghana needs to look at a radical shift in attitudes towards men and women in terms of dismantling the patriarchal ideologies.

Keywords: Ghanaian Government, Ghana, violence, patriarchal ideology.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

End the Silence, End the Violence

Description

End the Silence, End the Violence is a creative project to aid victims of domestic violence. There is a website, pamphlet, video and presentation attached that explains statistics, encourages awareness,

End the Silence, End the Violence is a creative project to aid victims of domestic violence. There is a website, pamphlet, video and presentation attached that explains statistics, encourages awareness, and provides victims with access to shelters and legal resources. The website and the pamphlet are intended to put all resources in one place, making them easily accessible for victims of domestic violence. The legal terms were explained, helping any victims who may not have a legal background understand how the court process works. On the website, the adult court process is explained in simple language. Orders of protection are also explained, as well as how to access them, with the direct links to the forms provided. Domestic Violence Shelters in Maricopa county are also listed, along with contact information. All of these shelters were contacted, and were verified to be open for a minimum of one year from October, 2019, and are still accepting victims. No addresses were provided on either the website or the pamphlet, with the hopes that not providing locations will better protect the victims who are seeking help. The pamphlet includes these same shelter resources, along with contact information. The presentation includes domestic violence statistics, as well as important terms and definitions. Finally, there was a video to encourage awareness towards domestic violence. Purple and red paint was used to demonstrate common places these victims suffered abuse, with the purple representing sexual violence, and the red representing physical violence. Not all of the volunteers in the video are victims of domestic violence, but are all advocates for ending domestic violence and helping with prevention.

The website can be found at http://endyoursilence.org/

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

158111-Thumbnail Image.png

Dismembering Rape Culture: Exposing Ghosts of Sexual Violence from London, 1870-1890

Description

Did the Victorians live in a “rape culture”? London between 1870 and 1890 was certainly a place in which sexual violence was publicly condemned as an overall concept (W. T.

Did the Victorians live in a “rape culture”? London between 1870 and 1890 was certainly a place in which sexual violence was publicly condemned as an overall concept (W. T. Stead’s “The Maiden Tribute of Modern Babylon, for example). Yet, in contrast to the moral denunciation, the historical archive demonstrates excuses constantly condoned sexual violence (as evidenced in parliamentary debates, criminal transcripts, newspaper crime coverage, and social campaigns like those of Josephine Butler). Forensic medical doctors, police, coroners, journalists, illustrators, and editors all contributed and reinforced a system that sustained and condoned rape as evidenced by the newspaper crime reports; but, to blame them for their actions, as if each action was performed with malicious intent, would hide the greater system of oppression that operated both blatantly and in the shadows. When one demographic holds significant power over another – as men did over women in Victorian England – those power relations become embedded into its culture in ways that are never clearly transparent and continue to haunt the future until exposed and rectified. To this end, my dissertation investigates newspaper crime narratives to reveal the heterocryptic ghosts and make their multiple legacies visible.

Murder of women by men are significantly linked via cultural perceptions. Anna Clark discovered this with Mary Ashford’s rape and murder in 1817. Though Ashford died from drowning, the narratives rewrote her death as if it was the rape that had killed her. Based on this correlation, this study focuses on six cases of unsolved female murder and dismemberment. The decision to use unsolved cases stems from the hypothesis that more gendered assumptions would manifest in the crime narratives as the journalists (and police, coroners, and forensic doctors) tried to discern the particulars of the crime within contexts that made sense to them. Analytical coding of the data demonstrates the prevalence of rape myths operating within the narratives in conjunction with misogynistic and classist beliefs. From initial discovery to forensic inspections to inquest verdicts and beyond a number of myriad historical materializations are exposed that continue to haunt the present.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020