Matching Items (8)

Coding for Classrooms: The Changing Landscape of K-12 Computer Science Education

Description

This report is intended to serve as a comprehensive resource for parents, teachers and community members who are interested in learning more about the emergence, direction and scope of the

This report is intended to serve as a comprehensive resource for parents, teachers and community members who are interested in learning more about the emergence, direction and scope of the computer science education movement. Many K-12 school districts begun to develop and facilitate their own computer science education programs, often in the form of extracurricular clubs and classes. However, third-party businesses play a significant role in supplementing classrooms with software and hardware products, professional development services, and instruction services. This report explores the complexity of the computer science education environment by exploring the movement of advocacy for increasing computer science in K-12 schools and analyzing the emergent competitive landscape of for-profit and non-profit businesses. Additionally, the report offers insight to the computer science education landscape in Arizona through the lens of the research study "Computer Science Education in Maricopa County Public School Districts for K-8 Students." This study presents the findings from in-depth interviews with educators about how school-based computer science programs are structured and how they are received by students, parents and teachers. The report also offers broad recommendations for school programs, analyzes the potential for a national model, and discusses next steps for states, businesses and individuals. Keywords: computer science education, K-12 schools, public education, coding, Code.org, Hour of Code

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Aging Population and Education Finance Under Endogenous Migration

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This paper explores the potential impact of population aging trends on support for the financing of public education using an applied theoretical approach. As demographic projections anticipate significant increases in

This paper explores the potential impact of population aging trends on support for the financing of public education using an applied theoretical approach. As demographic projections anticipate significant increases in the relative share of elderly individuals in the population, the question of how age distribution in a population effects support for public goods such as education becomes increasingly significant. Conventional wisdom suggests that an upward shift in age distribution – increasing the share of elderly individuals relative to workers – will result in decreased support for public education due to elderly individuals’ lack of utility from investments in future productivity. This paper demonstrates that such conventional wisdom does not hold in a simple two-district overlapping generations model and shows that an increasing share of elderly individuals in the population may result in increased levels of funding for education due to changes in a district’s tax base.

The model developed in this paper builds on the work of Mark Gradstein and Michael Kaganovich who demonstrated that while increasing longevity in a two-generation OLG model with two municipal districts creates a downward pressure on tax rates, this effect is dominated by changing political incentives among workers. This paper expands upon the Gradstein-Kaganovich model by introducing endogenous migration rates between districts in the model in order to reflect households’ incentives to minimize tax burden in retirement. It can be shown that as consumers’ responsiveness to differences in tax rates increases, the difference in education funding levels between districts decreases despite the difference in the relative share of elderly individuals in each population increasing. This result stems from the changes in each districts’ tax base brought on by the endogenous migration rate. Based on this finding, this study concludes that retirees function as a positive financial externality when education funding is tied to consumption levels and reaffirms Gradstein and Kaganovich’s conclusion that increasing the relative share of elderly individuals in a population does not necessarily result in decreased funding for public education as conventional wisdom would suggest.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Public Knowledge of Acne Scar Prevention

Description

Acne scarring can negatively affect individuals’ lives long after active acne has resolved. An online survey analyzed the public’s acne history and knowledge of acne scar prevention to determine acne

Acne scarring can negatively affect individuals’ lives long after active acne has resolved. An online survey analyzed the public’s acne history and knowledge of acne scar prevention to determine acne scar risk factors and public awareness of acne scar prevention and yielded 209 complete data sets. Though types of acne scars vary in how long they persist on one’s skin, all forms were found to be equal in the negative psychological impact they inflict. Acne severity, acne duration, individual age, and family history of scarring were found to have associations with atrophic scarring The findings suggest a need for implementing a structured and standardized way for communicating acne scar prevention information to the general public. Practical implications of these findings are discussed further for increasing public awareness of acne scarring and prevention knowledge.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Addressing the Limitations of Distance Learning and Improving its Efficacy in Arizona Public Education

Description

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced educators since 2020 to shift from all in-person learning to virtual learning through applications like Zoom. Students are now part of a collage of faces

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced educators since 2020 to shift from all in-person learning to virtual learning through applications like Zoom. Students are now part of a collage of faces including their teachers’ who often may be dealing with technical glitches, foreign-looking interfaces, and unintentionally disruptive students. On the other side, students may struggle to find a stable working environment as they learn from home. Distance learning has been explored well before 2020, but its necessity, given the nature of a virus that preys on in-person interaction, has forced itself to the top of relevant conversation. . The issues with distance learning in primary education have roots in long standing issues with the education system as a whole. Without greater public awareness of the woes in our education system, the status quo of declining academic success, teacher salaries, and increasing classroom sizes will continue in the future. The problems with distance learning specifically represent a much more everlasting issue that is lack of accountability and action of lawmakers who are able to make these reforms.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Research into Phoenix-area School Districts' Supports and Incentives for graduation and higher education with regard to students in the foster care system

Description

This paper is written to describe the results of an undergraduate thesis project which grew from an interest in the various supports teenagers in the foster care system can obtain

This paper is written to describe the results of an undergraduate thesis project which grew from an interest in the various supports teenagers in the foster care system can obtain the city of Phoenix, Arizona. Since graduation rates are quite low for this demographic on a national level, there is a need to research what incentives and supports various high school districts in different cities and towns within Phoenix offer students within the foster care system in order to promote graduation and potentially the pursuit of higher education. Literary texts were analyzed and district and high school officials from around the Phoenix-area were interviewed. Information gathered from these correspondences was followed by contacting local colleges in order to see what those institutions provide in terms of scholarships and housing, since after age 18 these teenagers are no longer considered wards of the state and therefore "age out" of the system. The results of this endeavor are written on the following pages.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

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Dimensions of partnership in cross-sector relationships: a multi-case study of local education foundations

Description

Cross-sector interactions are regularly seen in healthcare, education, defense, public safety, and other social service contexts where the public interest and the private individual intersect. While interest in cross-sector

Cross-sector interactions are regularly seen in healthcare, education, defense, public safety, and other social service contexts where the public interest and the private individual intersect. While interest in cross-sector relationships is neither new nor novel, the organizational dynamics and contexts continue to change and challenge our understanding of what is meant by partnership, alliance, collaboration, or cooperation between independent organizations from different sectors. One type of cooperative arrangement between nonprofits and government are affiliated foundations, which are part of the landscape of emerging organizational hybrids and expanding government-nonprofit relationships. Affiliated foundations are nonprofits designed to support a specific entity by generating charitable resources. This dissertation looks at one specific context for affiliated foundation/ "parent" relationships through a multi-case study of local educations in Florida. Specifically, this research examines how local education foundations carry out a partnering relationship with the school district. Through a combination of three instrumental case studies of local education foundations, and fifteen other purposely selected foundations, this dissertation presents the results of a cross-case analysis of the partnership between local education foundations and school districts. Partnership is conceptualized across four dimensions: 1) attention, 2) successive engagement, 3) resource infusion, and 4) positional identity. This research reveals that through the four dimensions of partnership, we can account for the variation across embedded, interdependent, or independent local education foundations in relation to the school district, or their "parent" organization. As a result, local education foundations reflect different relationships with school districts, which ultimately impacts their ability to carry out their work as charitable organizations, derived from the community in which they operate, and designed to generate resources and support for public education. By looking at this specific context, we can consider the complexities of an affiliated relationship between two structurally separate but linked organizations assumed to act as partners, but working to achieve a partnership. Where cooperation, collaboration, and innovation are intended outcomes of affiliated foundation/government relationships, this research considers the role of affiliated foundations among more traditional cross-sector relationships where services and contracts tend to dominate.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Entrepreneurship and business performance indicators as determinants of Arizona charter schools quality

Description

This dissertation focuses on entrepreneurial and business performance indicators as determinants of Arizona charter schools' quality. The study utilizes a mixed-method inquiry with focus on qualitative research, exploration, and implementation

This dissertation focuses on entrepreneurial and business performance indicators as determinants of Arizona charter schools' quality. The study utilizes a mixed-method inquiry with focus on qualitative research, exploration, and implementation studies. It draws data from surveys with charter operators performed by Education Team Partners (ETP). All survey results are drawn from the ETP database. The study reviews the genesis and evolution of charter schools. It reviews the social agreement within the context of public policy analysis, and the public-private partnership nature within the context of entrepreneurship and business management. It attempts to develop a research-based foundation for future action research to complement the newly introduced performance management plan (PMP) measurement and evaluation system in Arizona. The research includes four group indicators for measuring charter schools' business productivity and performance. They are studied in relation to three groups of indicators for measuring charter schools' quality. The case studies include two existing and two future charter schools. Study results indicate that all participating charter operators confirm the significance of the liquidity ratio in relation to any aspect of charter school quality covered in this study. The participants indicated a strong relationship between the capacities of their schools to utilize external resources and all indicators of charter school quality. This study draws two important conclusions. First, charter schools are business organizations, despite the fact that they receive public funds. Operationally, they differ substantially from district schools and government agencies and depend on market forces. Second, charter schools cannot survive inefficient management practices, as market forces tend to drive them out of business, regardless of academic success and student achievement levels. The intended implications from this study include: first, increased awareness about the importance of understanding business indicators in relation to charter school quality; second, the need for more research associated with the business and finance components of charter schools. As the body of collective knowledge about charter schools expands, the relationship between various business indicators to measures of quality should be routinely studied within larger populations, which may allow for an improved measurement system and applications of advanced statistical methods.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Promoting Latino parent involvement in K-8 schools through a communities of practice approach

Description

Due to federal mandates, Title I schools now are being asked to implement parent involvement programs that meaningfully involve parents in the schools to increase academic gains. This action research

Due to federal mandates, Title I schools now are being asked to implement parent involvement programs that meaningfully involve parents in the schools to increase academic gains. This action research study was based on three different concepts from the literature: a) critical pedagogy theory from Paulo Freire, b) parent involvement from diverse scholars including Epstein, Olivos, Mapp, Henderson, and Gonzalez-DeHass, and c) Wenger's communities of practice approach. The study was designed to determine whether a community of practice approach could provide the necessary conditions to meaningfully involve Latino Spanish-speaking parents in school. This innovation took place for 14-weeks, during which the community of practice approach was developed and utilized during meetings. Data were collected during each community of practice meeting at two schools. The data sources were surveys, audio video transcriptions of the meetings, journal, field notes, leadership meetings, and analytic memos. To add reliability and validity, mixed methods were applied to triangulate the data sources. Results indicated that through a community of practice approach Latino Spanish-speaking parents could become meaningfully involved in their children's schools. Parent participants reported that the community of practice allowed them to dialogue, contribute, learn, reflect, and become self-aware of their role in the schools. Data also showed that parent participants applied the community of practice approach to contribute to the solution of problems at their school. After participating in the study, parent participants realized their potential to impact in their children's school. Additionally, they started purposefully becoming more interested in participating and planning activities with the parent liaison. Based on the results, further cycles of action research are suggested.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012