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Conductive Heat Transfer in Rotary Drums

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In industrial applications, rotary drums are poorly understood and preform suboptimally when used to process particulates. In order to better understand how these drums work, a statistical experiment was designed

In industrial applications, rotary drums are poorly understood and preform suboptimally when used to process particulates. In order to better understand how these drums work, a statistical experiment was designed to measure the effects of the fill level and rotation rate on the final temperature of the particle bed. A steel rotary drum was set up to be headed by three external heat guns, simulating the conditions under which standard rotary drums are operated. By measuring the bed temperature at steady state, and recording the combination of factors in each run, a regression analysis was run to determine the factor's effects. Fill level was seen to have a small positive effect, rotation rate was seen to have a small negative effect, and the interaction of the two was shown to have a large positive effect. This led the team to conclude that the flow profile of the bed may be the most important factor in heat transfer, and that further research should be done to isolate and study the effect of the flow profile.

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  • 2018-05

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A Quantitative Study on the Effects of Operating Conditions on Heat Transfer in a Rotary Drum

Description

Rotary drums are commonly used for their high heat and mass transfer rates in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, cement, food, and other particulate products. These processes are difficult to model

Rotary drums are commonly used for their high heat and mass transfer rates in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, cement, food, and other particulate products. These processes are difficult to model because the particulate behavior is governed by the process conditions such as particle size, particle size distribution, shape, composition, and operating parameters, such as fill level and rotation rate. More research on heat transfer in rotary drums will increase operating efficiency, leading to tremendous energy savings on a global scale. This study investigates the effects of drum fill level and rotation rate on the steady-state average particle bed temperature. 3 mm silica beads and a stainless steel rotary drum were used at fill levels ranging from 10 \u2014 25 % and rotation rates from 2 \u2014 10 rpm. Four heat guns were used to heat the system via conduction and convection, and an infrared camera was used to record temperature data. A three-level, two-factor, full-factorial design of experiments was employed to determine the effects of each factor on the steady-state average bed temperature. Low fill level and high rotation rate resulted in higher steady-state average bed temperatures. A quantitative model showed that rotation rate had a larger impact on the steady-state bed temperature than fill level.

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  • 2018-05

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Heat Transfer in a Rotary Drum Using Infrared Camera Temperature Measurement

Description

Rotary drums are commonly used for their high heat and mass transfer rates in the manufacture of cement, pharmaceuticals, food, and other particulate products. These processes are difficult to model

Rotary drums are commonly used for their high heat and mass transfer rates in the manufacture of cement, pharmaceuticals, food, and other particulate products. These processes are difficult to model because the particulate behavior is governed by the process conditions such as particle size, particle size distribution, shape, composition, and operating parameters, such as fill level and rotation rate. More research on heat transfer in rotary drums will increase operating efficiency, leading to significant energy savings on a global scale.

This research utilizes infrared imaging to investigate the effects of fill level and rotation rate on the particle bed hydrodynamics and the average wall-particle heat transfer coefficient. 3 mm silica beads and a stainless steel rotary drum with a diameter of 6 in and a length of 3 in were used at fill levels of 10 %, 17.5 %, and 25 %, and rotation rates of 2 rpm, 6 rpm, and 10 rpm. Two full factorial designs of experiments were completed to understand the effects of these factors in the presence of conduction only (Case 1) and conduction with forced convection (Case 2). Particle-particle friction caused the particle bed to stagnate at elevated temperatures in Case 1, while the inlet air velocity in Case 2 dominated the particle friction effects to maintain the flow profile. The maximum heat transfer coefficient was achieved at a high rotation rate and low fill level in Case 1, and at a high rotation rate and high fill level in Case 2. Heat losses from the system were dominated by natural convection between the hot air in the drum and the external surroundings.

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  • 2019

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Statistical Analysis of 3D-DEM for Steady State Conduction Heat Transfer in a Rotary Drum

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The current research is based on the principles of three-dimensional discrete element method (3D – DEM) through simulations, by using heat transfer models in EDEM, to investigate the effects of

The current research is based on the principles of three-dimensional discrete element method (3D – DEM) through simulations, by using heat transfer models in EDEM, to investigate the effects of fill level, rotation rate and particle size on the steady-state conduction heat transfer in rotary drums. The high heat and mass transfer rates obtained through rotary drums make them very useful for powder mixing and heating processes in metallurgical, cement, mining, pharmaceutical, detergent and other particulate processing applications. However, these complex processes are difficult to model and operate since the particles can have a wide range of properties, and there is currently no way to predict the optimal operating conditions for a given material.

Steady-state heat transfer by conduction forms the basis for understanding other steady-state and unsteady-state heat transfer in a rotary drum – conduction, convection and radiation. Statistical analysis is carried out to determine the effects of these process parameters and find optimal operating conditions, which will thereby improve the heat transfer efficiency in rotary drums. A stainless-steel drum with a diameter of 6 inches and a length of 3 inches was modeled in EDEM with silica beads of sizes 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm at fill levels of 10%, 17.5% and 25%, and at rotation rates of 2 rpm, 5 rpm and 10 rpm. It was found that the heating uniformity increased with decreasing particle size, decreasing fill level and increasing rotation rate. This research is the first step towards studying the other heat transfer modes and various other process parameters. Better understanding of the various heat transfer modes, when used in combination for heating the particles, will be beneficial in improving the operating efficiency, reducing material costs and leading to significant energy conservation on a global scale.

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  • 2020

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Analyzing the Effects of Conduction, Convection, and Radiation in a Rotary Drum

Description

Rotary drums are tools used extensively in various prominent industries for their utility in heating and transporting particulate products. These processes are often inefficient and studies on heat transfer in

Rotary drums are tools used extensively in various prominent industries for their utility in heating and transporting particulate products. These processes are often inefficient and studies on heat transfer in rotary drums will reduce energy consumption as operating parameters are optimized. Research on this subject has been ongoing at ASU; however, the design of the rotary drum used in these studies is restrictive and experiments using radiation heat transfer have not been possible.<br/><br/>This study focuses on recounting the steps taken to upgrade the rotary drum setup and detailing the recommended procedure for experimental tests using radiant heat transfer upon completed construction of the new setup. To develop an improved rotary drum setup, flaws in the original design were analyzed and resolved. This process resulted in a redesigned drum heating system, an altered thinner drum, and a larger drum box. The recommended procedure for radiant heat transfer tests is focused on determining how particle size, drum fill level, and drum rotation rate impact the radiant heat transfer rate.

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  • 2021-05