Matching Items (22)

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Online Searches for Jury Selection

Description

The Sixth Amendment guarantees defendants the right to trial by an impartial jury. Attorneys are expected to obtain information about potential juror biases and then deselect biased jurors. Social networking

The Sixth Amendment guarantees defendants the right to trial by an impartial jury. Attorneys are expected to obtain information about potential juror biases and then deselect biased jurors. Social networking sites may offer useful information about potential jurors. Although some attorneys and trial consultants have begun searching online sources for information about jurors, the privacy rights of potential jurors’ online content has yet to be defined by case law. Two studies explored the issue of possible intrusion into juror privacy. First, an active jury venire was searched for online content. Information was found for 36% of the jurors; however, 94% of the information was found through simple Google searches. Only 6% of the information we found was unique to other sites. We concluded that searching for potential jurors online is feasible, but that systematically searching sites other than Google is generally not an effective search strategy. In our second study we surveyed attorneys, trial consultants, law students, and undergraduate students about ethical and privacy issues in the use of public domain information for jury selection. Participants evidenced concern about the rights of jurors, the rights of the defendant and accuser, and the role of tradition in court processes.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Privacy-guaranteed Data Collection: The Case for Efficient Resource Management of Nonprofit Organizations

Description

Through the personal experience of volunteering at ASU Project Humanities, an organization that provides resources such as clothing and toiletries to the homeless population in Downtown Phoenix, I noticed efficiently

Through the personal experience of volunteering at ASU Project Humanities, an organization that provides resources such as clothing and toiletries to the homeless population in Downtown Phoenix, I noticed efficiently serving the needs of the homeless population is an important endeavor, but the current processes for Phoenix nonprofits to collect data are manual, ad-hoc, and inefficient. This leads to the research question: is it possible to improve this process of collecting statistics on client needs, tracking donations, and managing resources using technology? Background research includes an interview with ASU Project Humanities, articles by analysts, and related work including case studies of current technologies in the nonprofit community. Major findings include i) a lack of centralized communication in nonprofits collecting needs, tracking surplus donations, and sharing resources, ii) privacy assurance is important to homeless individuals, and iii) pre-existing databases and technological solutions have demonstrated that technology has the ability to make an impact in the nonprofit community. To improve the process, standardization, efficiency, and automation need to increase. As a result of my analysis, the thesis proposes a prototype solution which includes two parts: an inventory database and a web application with forms for user input and tables for the user to view. This solution addresses standardization by showing a consistent way of collecting data on need requests and surplus donations while guaranteeing privacy of homeless individuals. This centralized solution also increases efficiency by connecting different agencies that cater to these clients. Lastly, the solution demonstrates the ability for resources to be made available to each organization which can increase automation. In conclusion, this database and web application has the potential to improve nonprofit organizations’ networking capabilities, resource management, and resource distribution. The percentile of homeless individuals connected to these resources is expected to increase substantially with future live testing and large-scale implementation.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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How Much Do They Know? A Study on Mobile Phone Information Use

Description

Smartphone privacy is a growing concern around the world; smartphone applications routinely take personal information from our phones and monetize it for their own profit. Worse, they're doing it legally.

Smartphone privacy is a growing concern around the world; smartphone applications routinely take personal information from our phones and monetize it for their own profit. Worse, they're doing it legally. The Terms of Service allow companies to use this information to market, promote, and sell personal data. Most users seem to be either unaware of it, or unconcerned by it. This has negative implications for the future of privacy, particularly as the idea of smart home technology becomes a reality. If this is what privacy looks like now, with only one major type of smart device on the market, what will the future hold, when the smart home systems come into play. In order to examine this question, I investigated how much awareness/knowledge smartphone users of a specific demographic (millennials aged 18-25) knew about their smartphone's data and where it goes. I wanted three questions answered: - For what purposes do millennials use their smartphones? - What do they know about smartphone privacy and security? - How will this affect the future of privacy? To accomplish this, I gathered information using a distributed survey to millennials attending Arizona State University. Using statistical analysis, I exposed trends for this demographic, discovering that there isn't a lack of knowledge among millennials; most are aware that smartphone apps can collect and share data and many of the participants are not comfortable with the current state of smartphone privacy. However, more than half of the study participants indicated that they never read an app's Terms of Service. Due to the nature of the privacy vs. convenience argument, users will willingly agree to let apps take their personal in- formation, since they don't want to give up the convenience.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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The Facebook Revolution: A Case Study in the Need for New Forms of Social Responsibility in the Way Private Owners Manage Essential Public Services.

Description

This paper uses Facebook as a case study for other technological and social media companies given factors presented by the Digital Age. Three different pillars are used to analyze the

This paper uses Facebook as a case study for other technological and social media companies given factors presented by the Digital Age. Three different pillars are used to analyze the company. First an examination of the manipulation of users on Facebook by Russian actors is presented. Next, the paper examines whether Facebook is promoting civic participation for good. Lastly, an analyzation of the rising trend of hate speech and extremists using the site is presented. This examination of Facebook then posed three questions regarding companies in the Digital Age as a whole. The first was "What is the extent of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Digital Age?" The second was, "What special obligations do for-profit companies have when it comes to safeguarding the privacy of individuals, or at least insuring that their stored information does not harm them?". The last question presented was, "How Can the Profit Motive and Corporate Morality Co-Exist in the Digital Age?" The findings of this case study showed that due to different factors that are presented in the Digital Age, these ideals of Corporate Social Responsibility, Privacy and Corporate Morality may be even more challenging to uphold during this Age of Information. Due to this fact, companies such as Facebook have an even greater responsibility to abide by these ideals of Corporate Social Responsibility, Privacy and Corporate Morality. This is because of an even larger potential for negative effects due to technological change. Regardless of the possibility for regulation by government, third-party organization or by the organizations themselves, Digital Age Corporations have the duty to protect their users from harm and maintain these three ideals.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Facebook Perceived User Privacy

Description

There are potential risks when individuals choose to share information on social media platforms such as Facebook. With over 2.20 billion active monthly users, Facebook has the largest collection of

There are potential risks when individuals choose to share information on social media platforms such as Facebook. With over 2.20 billion active monthly users, Facebook has the largest collection of user information compared to other social media sites. Due to their large collection of data, Facebook has constantly received criticism for their data privacy policies. Facebook has constantly changed its privacy policies in the effort to protect itself and end users. However, the changes in privacy policy may not translate into users changing their privacy controls. The goal of Facebook privacy controls is to allow Facebook users to be in charge of their data privacy. The goal of this study was to determine if a gap between user perceived privacy and reality existed. If this gap existed we investigated to see if certain information about the user would have a relationship to their ability to implement their settings successfully. We gathered information of ASU college students such as: gender, field of study, political affiliations, leadership involvement, privacy settings and online behaviors. After collecting the data, we reviewed each participants' Facebook profiles to examine the existence of the gap between their privacy settings and information available as a stranger. We found that there existed a difference between their settings and reality and it was not related to any of the users' background information.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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An Exploratory Analysis of Individual Long-Term Google Search and Browsing History

Description

Our lives are documented and facilitated by the internet. Given that an increasing proportion of time is being spent online, search and browsing history offers a unique frame of reference

Our lives are documented and facilitated by the internet. Given that an increasing proportion of time is being spent online, search and browsing history offers a unique frame of reference to conduct a qualitative study since it contains individual goals, day-to-day experiences, illicit thoughts, and questions, all while capturing sentiments rather than statistics. Seeing this recorded daily activity mapped out over the course of several years would hopefully provide a startling reminder of how life can be accurately and simply described as a series of constantly evolving interests and intentions, as well as give a sense of how exhaustively massive internet companies collect private information online. The search engine giant Google offers its users the transparency and freedom to export and download an archive of their web activity through a service known as Google Takeout. We propose using this service to empower ordinary individuals with Google accounts by developing a comprehensive and qualitative approach to understanding and gaining insights about their personal behavior online. In this paper, we first define and analyze the need for such a product. Then we conduct a variety of intent and interest-sensitive computational analysis methods on a sample browser history to explore and contextualize emergent trends, as a proof of concept. Finally, we create a blueprint for building an interactive application which uses our approach to generate dynamic dashboards and unique user profiles from search and browsing data.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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US Federal Policy Proposal for the Protection of Citizens’ Data

Description

This policy proposal paper is designed to address concerns about the protection of data
concerning citizens of the United States. The first step is to explore the need for federal

This policy proposal paper is designed to address concerns about the protection of data
concerning citizens of the United States. The first step is to explore the need for federal
legislation because of the problems of cyberattacks, data loss and leakage, and big data. The
proposal then analyses how other countries had already addressed these concerns for their
citizens through legislation by looking at their regulation and the results of implementation. The
paper adjacently discusses the importance of American values of privacy as a fundamental right,
the free market, and protection from the private sector within a cybersecurity paradigm. From
this combined research, the paper yields a proposal of how the U.S. government should address
the situation through federal policy. The policy outlines cybersecurity measures to protect
information from cyberattacks and data loss and leakage, rights of American citizens that
organizations need to uphold, and the creation of a commission that provides resources and
education to domestic and foreign organizations.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Privacy Valuation Experiment

Description

This survey takes information on a participant’s beliefs on privacy security, the general digital knowledge, demographics, and willingness-to-pay points on if they would delete information on their social media, to

This survey takes information on a participant’s beliefs on privacy security, the general digital knowledge, demographics, and willingness-to-pay points on if they would delete information on their social media, to see how an information treatment affects those payment points. This information treatment is meant to make half of the participants think about the deeper ramifications of the information they reveal. The initial hypothesis is that this information will make people want to pay more to remove their information from the web, but the results find a surprising negative correlation with the treatment.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Ethics of Brain-Computer Interfaces

Description

The development of computational systems known as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) offers the possibility of allowing individuals disabled by neurological disorders such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and ischemic stroke the

The development of computational systems known as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) offers the possibility of allowing individuals disabled by neurological disorders such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and ischemic stroke the ability to perform relatively complex tasks such as communicating with others and walking. BCIs are closed-loop systems that record physiological signals from the brain and translate those signals into commands that control an external device such as a wheelchair or a robotic exoskeleton. Despite the potential for BCIs to vastly improve the lives of almost one billion people, one question arises: Just because we can use brain-computer interfaces, should we? The human brain is an embodiment of the mind, which is largely seen to determine a person's identity, so a number of ethical and philosophical concerns emerge over current and future uses of BCIs. These concerns include privacy, informed consent, autonomy, identity, enhancement, and justice. In this thesis, I focus on three of these issues: privacy, informed consent, and autonomy. The ultimate purpose of brain-computer interfaces is to provide patients with a greater degree of autonomy; thus, many of the ethical issues associated with BCIs are intertwined with autonomy. Currently, brain-computer interfaces exist mainly in the domain of medicine and medical research, but recently companies have started commercializing BCIs and providing them at affordable prices. These consumer-grade BCIs are primarily for non-medical purposes, and so they are beyond the scope of medicine. As BCIs become more widespread in the near future, it is crucial for interdisciplinary teams of ethicists, philosophers, engineers, and physicians to collaborate to address these ethical concerns now before BCIs become more commonplace.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05