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This study examines the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on self-efficacy (SE) and exercise perception (EP) in adults with Down syndrome (DS). Thirteen participants attended four sessions: a baseline assessment, an Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) session, a resistance training (RT) session, and a session of no training (NT). In

This study examines the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on self-efficacy (SE) and exercise perception (EP) in adults with Down syndrome (DS). Thirteen participants attended four sessions: a baseline assessment, an Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) session, a resistance training (RT) session, and a session of no training (NT). In the baseline assessment, 1-repetition max (1RM) measurements and voluntary pedal rate measurements were taken. In the cycling intervention, the participant completed 30 minutes of assisted cycling at 35 percent greater than their voluntary pedaling rate. In the resistance training session, 2 sets of 8-12 repetitions of the leg press, chest press, seated row, leg curl, shoulder press, and latissimus pulldown were performed. During the session of no training, participants played board games with student researchers for 35 minutes.Two subsets of the Physical Activity and Self Efficacy Survey were administered prior to each session (i.e., pretest) and after the intervention (i.e., post-test). The results were consistent with the hypothesis that ACT would lead to higher SE than RT or NT. However, ACT did not lead to higher EP than RT or NT as hypothesized. Additionally, it was hypothesized that RT would lead to higher SE and EP than NT, but the results did not support this. In conclusion, an acute session of ACT demonstrated a significant trend for improved self-efficacy in adults with DS.
ContributorsOberbillig, Nicole (Author) / Ringenbach, Shannon (Thesis director) / Ofori, Edward (Committee member) / School of International Letters and Cultures (Contributor) / College of Health Solutions (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2020-05
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Description
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Assisted Cycle Therapy (ACT) on self-efficacy and exercise perception in older adults with Down syndrome (DS) after a three times a week for 8 weeks intervention. Thirteen participants were in the ACT group in which a motor assisted their

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Assisted Cycle Therapy (ACT) on self-efficacy and exercise perception in older adults with Down syndrome (DS) after a three times a week for 8 weeks intervention. Thirteen participants were in the ACT group in which a motor assisted their cycling to be performed at least 30% faster than voluntary cycling (VC), 11 participants were in the voluntary cycling group and two participants were in the no cycling (NC) group. The results showed that both exercise groups (i.e., ACT and VC) improved in their self-efficacy after the 8 week intervention. In addition, exercise perception improved following ACT and not VC or NC. Our results are discussed with respect to their future implications for exercise in the DS population. It might be that the yielded results were due to differences in effort required by each intervention group as well as the neurotrophic factors that occur when muscle contractions create synaptic connections resulting in improvement in cognition and feelings of satisfaction. In the future, research should focus on the psychological factors such as social accountability and peer interaction as they relate to ACT and physical activity in person's with DS.
ContributorsTucker, Kori Ann (Author) / Ringenbach, Shannon (Thesis director) / Arnold, Nathaniel (Committee member) / Holzapfel, Simon (Committee member) / School of Nutrition and Health Promotion (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2018-05
Description
Why aren’t people with disabilities readily accepted into all aspects of the community and society? What are we missing out on? Even though inclusion is a civil right, people with disabilities are commonly discriminated against and excluded in all different aspects of society. We as a community are not affording individuals

Why aren’t people with disabilities readily accepted into all aspects of the community and society? What are we missing out on? Even though inclusion is a civil right, people with disabilities are commonly discriminated against and excluded in all different aspects of society. We as a community are not affording individuals with disabilities the opportunity to feel that they fully belong and have a purpose. Everyone deserves a chance to be understood and included, no matter the misconceptions or circumstances. The inclusion of people with disabilities affects all people. When we, as a community, readily accept and include individuals with disabilities, we all learn to value people’s differences and learn to see what each person has to offer. For my creative project, I conducted a 4-week virtual speakers series on disability and inclusion. Over the course of four weeks in September 2022 I hosted a virtual speakers series with a new speaker each week focusing on different topics. Topics discussed included self-advocacy, research on inclusion and early childhood development, inclusive sports, and IEP advocacy and inclusive education. My goal within this project and for society as a whole is for people with disabilities to be accepted and included without having to fight for it. People are afraid of what they don't know. If people with disabilities were more commonly included in the community, the fear would dissipate. People with disabilities would just be teammates, peers, and fellow employees. It would be a natural authentic everyday occurrence. I hope that society can work together to treat everyone the way they deserve to be treated.
ContributorsMaestretti, Tegan (Author) / Holzapfel, Simon (Thesis director) / Puruhito, Krista (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / College of Health Solutions (Contributor)
Created2022-12