Matching Items (6)

134227-Thumbnail Image.png

Global Perspectives on Juvenile Justice: Implementing A Restorative Approach

Description

This thesis is the culmination of the Barrett Honors Intercontinental Study Award. For this scholarship, I created a comparative legal study of the approaches to juvenile justice in Norway, Germany,

This thesis is the culmination of the Barrett Honors Intercontinental Study Award. For this scholarship, I created a comparative legal study of the approaches to juvenile justice in Norway, Germany, Malawi, and Japan, focusing on their compliance with international norms of restorative justice practices advanced by the United Nations (UN) in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). Before commencing my comparative study, I traveled to Switzerland and Belgium to speak with restorative justice theorists at the UN and the International Juvenile Justice Observatory about the enduring relevancy of the CRC and international juvenile justice efforts. In the process, I examined how these international norms of restorative justice come to be incorporated in domestic legal systems. From this, I gained an understanding of the reasons some countries successfully adapt international norms while others struggle to uphold even the most basic human rights. My goal throughout this process has been to cull best practices for international norm creation and domestic norm implementation from this research, and further study how best to promote restorative juvenile justice in countries that do not meet international standards, beginning with the United States. For the purpose of this thesis, I will focus my analysis on Norway and Malawi.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

131402-Thumbnail Image.png

Youth Restorative Justice in Courts: Program Evaluation and Tempe Municipal Court Proposal

Description

Juvenile restorative justice has become an increasingly common alternative to punitive justice in recent decades. This project evaluates best practices and strategies that have been effective in reducing recidivism while

Juvenile restorative justice has become an increasingly common alternative to punitive justice in recent decades. This project evaluates best practices and strategies that have been effective in reducing recidivism while upholding the key tenets of restoration. The goal of this project is to compile a reference for best practices and recommendations for the implementation of a juvenile restorative justice program at the Tempe Municipal Court. Through a comparison of two court-based restorative programs in the United States and a compilation of relevant research, a recommendation of Circle Conferencing is appropriate for the needs of the Tempe Municipal Court.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

158110-Thumbnail Image.png

From Zero Tolerance to Restorative Justice: Implementing Restorative Justice in a High School System

Description

Implementation of large-scale initiatives within educational systems can present many challenges, particularly when the initiative is non-linear and relies on deep understanding rooted in a restorative mindset. This study examined

Implementation of large-scale initiatives within educational systems can present many challenges, particularly when the initiative is non-linear and relies on deep understanding rooted in a restorative mindset. This study examined implementation of restorative justice within one large, primarily urban school district in the United States. Through a mixed methods approach, data was collected from three personnel levels of the organization: district leadership, school leadership, and school staff members and applied a sensemaking framework to examine the flow of information and understanding within and among organizational levels. To accomplish this investigation, both qualitative and quantitative data were collected. First, interview data was collected from district and school level leaders to inform supportive leadership actions and organizational structures and also to understand challenges that leaders faced when working to implement restorative justice within a district and across a school campus. Next, school staff members participated in a survey to provide deeper understanding regarding their confidence in implementing restorative justice practices, their perceptions of school and district level administrative support, and the alignment of their beliefs and actions with tenets of restorative justice. Finally, results were analyzed and compared across levels of the organization to provide a summary of findings and recommendations for ongoing and expanded implementation at the school at the focus of the study and across other schools within the district.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

154455-Thumbnail Image.png

Restorative practices: student conduct administrator staff development

Description

The goal of higher education institutions is to provide access to quality education along with adequate support so students can achieve personal and academic success. At the same time, institutions

The goal of higher education institutions is to provide access to quality education along with adequate support so students can achieve personal and academic success. At the same time, institutions are increasingly responsible for ensuring a safe and inclusive learning environment. To support this, universities respond to allegations of violations of the student code of conduct through a variety of conduct models. The use of restorative practices, an approach of responding to criminal or judicial violations with an emphasis on repairing relationships and reintegration into the community, has been implemented into existing university student conduct models across the nation with success. Student Rights and Responsibilities (SRR) conduct administrators at Arizona State University expressed feeling unprepared to engage in restorative conversations with students during conduct meetings. As a response, training modules on restorative justice theory and practices were created as a staff development engagement opportunity for SRR conduct administrators.

This mixed methods action research study was conducted to investigate the inclusion of restorative dialogue in conduct meetings, factors that influence the incorporation of restorative dialogue into professional practice, and conduct administrator satisfaction with staff development training modules. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through pre-, post-, and follow-up training survey assessments, one-on-one interviews with conduct administrators, observation of student conduct meetings, and observation of staff development training sessions.

Findings suggested that conduct administrators responded positively to staff development training on restorative justice practices. Analysis of quantitative data suggests that conduct administrators increased their self-reported knowledge of training topics, including restorative justice philosophy and practices. Further, conduct administrators, to an extent, incorporated restorative practices into conduct meetings. The most frequently observed practice was the use of restorative questions during conduct meetings.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

156295-Thumbnail Image.png

Starving the Beast: school-based restorative justice and the school-to-prison-pipeline

Description

National mandates to decrease suspension numbers have prompted school districts across the country to turn to a practice known as restorative justice as an alternative to removing students through suspension

National mandates to decrease suspension numbers have prompted school districts across the country to turn to a practice known as restorative justice as an alternative to removing students through suspension or referral to law enforcement for problematic behavior. This ethnographic case study examines school-based restorative justice programs as potentially disruptive social movements in dismantling the school-to-prison-pipeline through participatory analysis of one school’s implementation of Discipline that Restores.

Findings go beyond suspension numbers to discuss the promise inherent in the program’s validation of student lived experience using a disruptive framework within the greater context of the politics of care and the school-to-prison-pipeline. Findings analyze the intersection of race, power, and identity with the experience of care in defining community to illustrate some of the prominent structural impediments that continue to work to cap the program’s disruptive potential. This study argues that restorative justice, through the experience of care, has the potential to act as a disruptive force, but wrestles with the enormity of the larger structural investments required for authentic transformative and disruptive change to occur.

As the restorative justice movement gains steam, on-going critical analysis against a disruptive framework becomes necessary to ensure the future success of restorative discipline in disrupting the school-to-prison-pipeline.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

149483-Thumbnail Image.png

Community, context, and the emergence and shape of community courts

Description

ABSTRACT This research examines what contextual elements shape a community court. In the past several decades, the court system has lost trust with the American public. Citizens thought the courts

ABSTRACT This research examines what contextual elements shape a community court. In the past several decades, the court system has lost trust with the American public. Citizens thought the courts were too complex, expensive, didn't address the issues of crime, and were out of touch with their communities. A movement called community justice began to grow in the 1990s. As part of this movement the concept of problem solving courts grew. Community focused courts were part of this. Community courts are unique in that the courts reach out to the community to help solve problems identified by citizens, businesses, and others in that area. Various stakeholders are involved in the planning, implementation, and operation of these courts, working together to address issues that arise from those who commit a crime and come before the court. Four community courts were examined using the case study method, examining the literature and conducting interviews, and a model was developed based on these courts. Two additional courts were examined, having been established after judges from their respective communities had attended a national seminar on community focused courts. These two courts were then compared to the model. Based on the model, areas most likely to develop a community court were identified. Additionally, the model can be utilized to indicate how these courts can be successful or fail. Other issues that were examined were how community courts differ from traditional courts and how this could impact judicial impartiality and independence, and the traditional adversary system.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2010