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Contact Theory-Busted

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The intergroup contact theory purports positive effects of intergroup contact on both implicit and explicit attitudes. Implicit attitudes refer to the lack of awareness of the attitude, whereas explicit attitudes are conscious to each individual. The purpose of this study

The intergroup contact theory purports positive effects of intergroup contact on both implicit and explicit attitudes. Implicit attitudes refer to the lack of awareness of the attitude, whereas explicit attitudes are conscious to each individual. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of direct interaction with people with intellectual disabilities on both the conscious and unconscious attitudes of college students without intellectual disabilities. The intergroup contact was accomplished through the Exercise Program for Adults with Down Syndrome (ExDS) at Arizona State University (ASU). ExDS is a semester long program integrating ASU students with adults with Down syndrome to design and perform workouts in a buddy system twice a week. ASU students enrolled in unrelated on-ground courses served as control participants. Implicit attitudes were tested using the Implicit Association Task at the beginning and end of the semester. Explicit attitudes were also tested using a self-report questionnaire--Community Living Attitudes Scale-ID version before and after enrollment in the program. Results were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA, where the interaction effects were statistically insignificant for both the IAT and CLAS-ID. Limitations included inconsistencies in the data collection process, the type of contact with those with intellectual disabilities, possible testing effects of learning both measures pre- and post- testing and a small sample size. Further research is necessary to determine the most effective way to measure implicit and explicit biases to those with intellectual disabilities.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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The Role of Implicit Gender Bias in the Courtroom

Description

My thesis explores the role that implicit gender bias plays in the courtroom. From personal experience, I have seen the way that gender has been a factor in the courtroom as a result of both competing in and coaching Mock

My thesis explores the role that implicit gender bias plays in the courtroom. From personal experience, I have seen the way that gender has been a factor in the courtroom as a result of both competing in and coaching Mock Trial. As a competitor, my gender was always a factor in that I was told that I couldn't do something because I am female. As a coach, I found myself reinforcing these ideas of gender because that was what I was taught, even though I didn't agree with them. I decided to explore the role of gender in the courtroom using Mock Trial as a framework to study how implicit gender biases is present. As a result of my research, I argue that implicit gender bias is present in the courtroom, and that these biases create barriers for female success. I have conducted research based on a variety of sources, beginning with looking at the role women have historically played in the courtroom to current issues facing women attorneys today. I have researched the role of implicit gender bias and studied how these biases impact women and hinder their success. I conducted research through distribution of the coach survey and analyzed the responses. From these finding I have concluded that implicit gender bias is a factor in the courtroom and that these biases tend to negatively affect women competitors. I conclude that that more research and studies need to be done to make individuals aware of how implicit gender bias functions in the courtroom and how coaches in Mock Trial may be contributing to the reinforcement of these biases.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Addressing Implicit Bias in Mental Healthcare: A Novel Health Promotion Tool for the Treatment of Minority Mental Health Patients

Description

Minority mental health patients face many health inequities and inequalities that may stem from implicit bias and a lack of cultural awareness from their healthcare providers. I analyzed the current literature evaluating implicit bias among healthcare providers and culturally specific

Minority mental health patients face many health inequities and inequalities that may stem from implicit bias and a lack of cultural awareness from their healthcare providers. I analyzed the current literature evaluating implicit bias among healthcare providers and culturally specific life traumas that Latinos and African Americans face that can impact their mental health. Additionally, I researched a current mental health assessments tool, the Child and Adolescent Trauma Survey (CATS), and evaluated it for the use on Latino and African American patients. Face-to-face interviews with two healthcare providers were also used to analyze the CATS for its’ applicability to Latino and African American patients. Results showed that these assessments were not sufficient in capturing culturally specific life traumas of minority patients. Based on the literature review and analysis of the interviews with healthcare providers, a novel assessment tool, the Culturally Traumatic Events Questionnaire (CTEQ), was created to address the gaps that currently make up other mental health assessment tools used on minority patients.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05