Matching Items (2)

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Everyday Functioning in Individuals with Psychotic-like Experiences: Information Gleaned from Friends and Family

Description

Psychotic-Like Experiences (PLEs) are prevalent in the general population and may be a marker of risk for psychosis, yet little is known about the everyday functioning of individuals with PLEs.

Psychotic-Like Experiences (PLEs) are prevalent in the general population and may be a marker of risk for psychosis, yet little is known about the everyday functioning of individuals with PLEs. The purpose of this study was to compare everyday functioning of people with and without PLEs. Participants were 108 college students enrolled in an introductory psychology course who were selected for participation in the study because they scored in the top and bottom 10% of a screening test for PLEs. Informants were emailed questionnaires and asked to report on the participants' functioning in three domains: interpersonal functioning, disorganized behavior, and cognitive-perceptual functioning. Informants also reported on participants' attention and memory problems. Results showed that, consistent with prior research, individuals high in PLEs were from lower SES families and reported more depression, anxiety, and substance use. Moreover, informants for participants high in PLEs reported more unusual/disorganized behavior than informants for participants low in PLEs. No differences were observed between individuals high versus low in PLEs for informant-reported interpersonal functioning and attention and memory problems, however. Findings suggest that noticeable difficulties among individuals with PLEs are limited to disorganized behavior. More research is needed to determine the functional consequences of disorganized behavior among individuals with PLEs.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Creation and Validation of an Automated Head Twitch Analysis Instrument to Study a Mouse Model of Psychosis

Description

Serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) levels are decreased in the brains of schizophrenia patients. This phenomenon is modeled in mice that lack the transcription factor Egr3. The head-twitch response

Serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) levels are decreased in the brains of schizophrenia patients. This phenomenon is modeled in mice that lack the transcription factor Egr3. The head-twitch response (HTR) is a behavioral assay used to assess the physiological function of 5-HT2ARs. However, current quantification methods are time consuming and prone to inter-rater variability. Here, we demonstrate the validity and reliability of an automated head-twitch system to quantify HTRs of Egr3-/- mice.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05