Matching Items (13)

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The Effects of Organizational Stress on Employee Productivity

Description

In today's fast-paced work environment, stress is found in nearly every individual. Rising stress levels are leading to a myriad of physical and mental health problems and decreased productivity in

In today's fast-paced work environment, stress is found in nearly every individual. Rising stress levels are leading to a myriad of physical and mental health problems and decreased productivity in the workplace. The aim of this study is to reveal which management techniques result in the most productive, most happy, and least stressed employees. The study focuses on service industry companies located in Arizona, USA. Most of these companies are from Phoenix, although two are headquartered in Mesa, Arizona. Given the relatively small sizes of each group, every single employee was asked to partake in the study. No employees declined to contribute. From the evidence gathered, it was apparent that stress factors, such as poor working environment, lack of communication, and a lack of employee empowerment can all lead to stress and have a negative effect on productivity. Of these three stress factors, the results indicated that a poor work environment had the greatest effect on employee stress.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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A Simulation Model of the Effect of Workplace Structure on Productivity

Description

Workplace productivity is a result of many factors, and among them is the setup of the office and its resultant noise level. The conversations and interruptions that come along with

Workplace productivity is a result of many factors, and among them is the setup of the office and its resultant noise level. The conversations and interruptions that come along with converting an office to an open plan can foster innovation and creativity, or they can be distracting and harm the performance of employees. Through simulation, the impact of different types of office noise was studied along with other changing conditions such as number of people in the office. When productivity per person, defined in terms of mood and focus, was measured, it was found that the effect of noise was positive in some scenarios and negative in others. In simulations where employees were performing very similar tasks, noise (and its correlates, such as number of employees), was beneficial. On the other hand, when employees were engaged in a variety of different types of tasks, noise had a negative overall effect. This indicates that workplaces that group their employees by common job functions may be more productive than workplaces where the problems and products that employees are working on are varied throughout the workspace.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Managerial Factors in Effective Workplace Communication: Analyzing the effects of Tailoring Communication Styles and Verbalizing Expectations in the Workplace

Description

This project analyzes the large array of managerial leadership research in congruence with the wide field of workplace communication to attempt to determine the importance of refining communication channels between

This project analyzes the large array of managerial leadership research in congruence with the wide field of workplace communication to attempt to determine the importance of refining communication channels between managers and employees as well as articulate the core competencies a manager should exhibit when practicing exemplary communication in their respective work environment. The preliminary sections of this thesis will establish the currently existing foundations utilized and narrow the wide range of research available to applicable information regarding positive workplace communication, influencing factors in a feedback loop from the employee’s perspective, as well as leadership aspects and actions a manager can alter or initiate to improve their workplace’s environment through communicational refinement. This research is supplemented with a survey that was administered to Arizona State University student leaders who were involved in coordinating the Regional Business Conference on the Polytechnic campus. The survey data is designed to either confirm or contradict the findings of the literature. The objective of this project is to synthesize an overview of a manager’s responsibilities and recommend actions to tailor and improve workplace communication

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Use of Air Pollution to Explain Cross-Country Income Differences

Description

Using the Development Accounting methodology specified in Caselli (2004), we investigate the potential of PM2.5, a measure of pollution, as an explanation of cross-country differences in GDP using available Macroeconomic

Using the Development Accounting methodology specified in Caselli (2004), we investigate the potential of PM2.5, a measure of pollution, as an explanation of cross-country differences in GDP using available Macroeconomic data from the Penn World Table and the WHO. We find that the addition of PM2.5 makes improvements to the model within the expectations of the literature. This adjustment shows promise for use in cooperation with other, more potent economic factors.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Home Automation's Influence on Life

Description

This honors thesis utilizes smart home components and concepts from Dr. Burleson's Game as Life, Life as Game (GaLLaG) systems. The thesis focuses on an automated lifestyle, where individuals utilize

This honors thesis utilizes smart home components and concepts from Dr. Burleson's Game as Life, Life as Game (GaLLaG) systems. The thesis focuses on an automated lifestyle, where individuals utilize technology, such as door sensors, appliance and lamp modules, and system notifications, to assist in daily activities. The findings from our efforts to date indicate that after weeks of observations, there is no evidence that automated lifestyles create more productive and healthy lifestyles and lead to overall satisfaction in life; however, there are certain design principles that would assist future home automation applications.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Corrosion of the US Steel Industry: Macroeconomic Competition and Productivity

Description

The US steel industry experienced a great decline between 1950-1985. Influenced by several government policies, the industry was first cartelized during the great depression and then subjected to an extremely

The US steel industry experienced a great decline between 1950-1985. Influenced by several government policies, the industry was first cartelized during the great depression and then subjected to an extremely powerful organized labor force. Due to high demand between and during WWII and the Korean War, the industry expanded capacity using existing technologies. Simultaneously, organized labor was able to secure increased wages and large severance costs for firms that decided to shutdown existing steel mills. In the post war years this prevented firms from innovating through investing in newer, more efficient, technologies. Eventually US steel firms had no advantage against foreign producers who could produce steel cheaper and more efficiently.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Experimentation of managerial techniques for the optimization of a voluntary construction workforce

Description

Using experience, observations, data, current research, and writings in the field of volunteer management, it was determined there was a need to study the effects of leadership/management practices on the

Using experience, observations, data, current research, and writings in the field of volunteer management, it was determined there was a need to study the effects of leadership/management practices on the productivity outcomes of a volunteer construction workforce. A simple wood bench that would be tiled and painted was designed to test the areas of Time, Waste, Quality, Safety, and Satisfaction of different volunteer groups. The challenge was bolstered by giving the teams no power tools and limited available resources. A simple design of experiment model was used to test highs and lows in the three management techniques of Instruction, Help, and Encouragement. Each scenario was tested multiple times. Data was collected, normalized and analyzed using statistical analysis software. A few significant findings were discovered. The first; the research showed that there was no significant correlation between the management practices of the leader and the satisfaction of the volunteers. The second; the research also showed when further analyzed into specific realistic scenarios that the organizations would be better to focus on high amounts of Help and Encouragement in order to maximize the productivity of their volunteer construction workforce. This is significant as it allows NPO's and governments to focus their attention where best suited to produce results. The results were shared and the study was further validated as "significant" by conducting interviews with experts in the construction nonprofit sector.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Pilot tube microtunneling: instrumentation and monitoring for jacking force and productivity analysis

Description

Trenchless technology is a group of techniques whose utilization allows for the installation, rehabilitation, and repair of underground infrastructure with minimal excavation from the ground surface. As the built environment

Trenchless technology is a group of techniques whose utilization allows for the installation, rehabilitation, and repair of underground infrastructure with minimal excavation from the ground surface. As the built environment becomes more congested, projects are trending towards using trenchless technologies for their ability to quickly produce a quality product with minimal environmental and social costs. Pilot tube microtunneling (PTMT) is a trenchless technology where new pipelines may be installed at accurate and precise line and grade over manhole to manhole distances. The PTMT process can vary to a certain degree, but typically involves the following three phases: jacking of the pilot tube string to achieve line and grade, jacking of casing along the pilot bore and rotation of augers to excavate the borehole to a diameter slightly larger than the product pipe, and jacking of product pipe directly behind the last casing. Knowledge of the expected productivity rates and jacking forces during a PTMT installation are valuable tools that can be used for properly weighing its usefulness versus competing technologies and minimizing risks associated with PTMT. This thesis outlines the instrumentation and monitoring process used to record jacking frame hydraulic pressures from seven PTMT installations. Cyclic patterns in the data can be detected, indicating the installation of a single pipe segment, and enabling productivity rates for each PTMT phase to be determined. Furthermore, specific operations within a cycle, such as pushing a pipe or retracting the machine, can be observed, allowing for identification of the critical tasks associated with each phase. By identifying the critical tasks and developing more efficient means for their completion, PTMT productivity can be increased and costs can be reduced. Additionally, variations in depth of cover, drive length, pipe diameter, and localized ground conditions allowed for trends in jacking forces to be identified. To date, jacking force predictive models for PTMT are non-existent. Thus, jacking force data was compared to existing predictive models developed for the closely related pipe jacking and microtunneling methodologies, and the applicability of their adoption for PTMT jacking force prediction was explored.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Office design: an exploration of worker satisfaction and their perceptions of effective workspaces

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ABSTRACT Recent studies indicate that top-performing companies have higher-performing work environments than average companies. They receive higher scores for worker satisfaction with their overall physical work environment as well as

ABSTRACT Recent studies indicate that top-performing companies have higher-performing work environments than average companies. They receive higher scores for worker satisfaction with their overall physical work environment as well as higher effectiveness ratings for their workspaces (Gensler, 2008; Harter et al., 2003). While these studies indicate a relationship between effective office design and satisfaction they have not explored which specific space types may contribute to workers' overall satisfaction with their physical work environment. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between workers' overall satisfaction with their physical work environments and their perception of the effectiveness of spaces designed for Conceptual Age work including learning, focusing, collaborating, and socializing tasks. This research is designed to identify which workspace types are related to workers' satisfaction with their overall work environment and which are perceived to be most and least effective. To accomplish this two primary and four secondary research questions were developed for this study. The first primary question considers overall workers' satisfaction with their overall physical work environments (offices, workstations, hallways, common areas, reception, waiting areas, etc.) related to the effective use of work mode workspaces (learning, focusing, collaborating, socializing). The second primary research question was developed to identify which of the four work mode space types had the greatest and least relationship to workers' satisfaction with the overall physical work environment. Secondary research questions were developed to address workers' perceptions of effectiveness of each space type. This research project used data from a previous study collected from 2007 to 2012. Responses were from all staff levels of US office-based office workers and resulted in a blind sample of approximately 48,000 respondents. The data for this study were developed from SPSS data reports that included descriptive data and Pearson correlations. Findings were developed from those statistics using coefficient of determination.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

Transitioning workplace environments: from an FM perspective

Description

Facilities Management (FM) around the globe at different companies in different industries are often forced to make difficult decisions on whether or not to transition a workplace environment and how

Facilities Management (FM) around the globe at different companies in different industries are often forced to make difficult decisions on whether or not to transition a workplace environment and how to decide what factors of a workplace environment can benefit or hinder a company's productivity. The data and research presented within this paper are targeted at aiding and educating FM in determining what factors to consider in a workplace transition to an open-seating design and validate the importance of recognizing how these factors impact the productivity of the individual and the organization. Data contained in this paper was gathered through two different survey samples: 1) a semiconductor company that transitioned its employees from cubicles and offices to an open-seating environment; and 2) a general study open to professionals and their experiences and opinions on workplace environments. This data was used to validate or disprove the views on open-seating workspace held by the FM industry today. Data on the topic of how employees react to being transitioned to open-seating environments and looking at the breakdown of the results between engineers and non-engineers is examined within this research. Also covered within the research is data on transitions to other seating environments outside of open-seating concepts to evaluate and compare transition types. Lastly, data was gathered and discussed on the amount of time needed to adapt after a transition and what environment types were linked to being the most productive. This research provides insight on workplace environments and transitions and how they have an impact on productivity and can be used in the decision process when considering transitioning environments.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017