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An Analysis of the Impact of Female Leadership on Corporate Social Responsibility

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This study aims to evaluate and explore whether a positive correlation exists between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, as well as its subsequent reasoning, while specifically focusing on female leaders within the upper management (i.e. board of directors

This study aims to evaluate and explore whether a positive correlation exists between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, as well as its subsequent reasoning, while specifically focusing on female leaders within the upper management (i.e. board of directors and CEOs) of S&P 500 firms. Since several studies identify a positive relationship between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, our case study of IBM and PepsiCo aims to provide a real-life framework to these theoretical models. Ultimately, our case study does align with the findings of those models, yet also provides a unique perspective as to the reasoning for the difference in CSR outcomes, citing business strategy as opposed to altruism and other-orientation. Due to our limited sample size, our findings do not empirically support this notion, but instead offers a potential area for further research.

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2019-05

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Quiet Impact: Investigating the Relationship Between Introversion and Commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility

Description

This thesis explores the relationship between introversion and individual commitment to corporate social responsibility. Research was gathered from a survey that classifies respondents as introverts or extroverts, and analyzes perceptions and commitment to social responsibility both on an organizational and

This thesis explores the relationship between introversion and individual commitment to corporate social responsibility. Research was gathered from a survey that classifies respondents as introverts or extroverts, and analyzes perceptions and commitment to social responsibility both on an organizational and personal behavior level. Findings from the study show that introverts are not more likely than extroverts to prioritize social responsibility at work or through their personal lives. However, there is evidence in this study that introverts think about corporate social responsibility and its effects on business success in a different way than extroverts. Introverts focus on avoiding risk, and they may be more prone than extroverts to see business success and social responsibility as two opposing forces. Introverts also perceive a wider gap between the current state of prioritization for CSR responsibilities and what they feel this prioritization should be. This study has a number of practical implications for business leaders hoping to increase commitment to CSR within an organization while drawing on the strengths of each personality type. Recommendations for increasing commitment to CSR are based on survey findings and research from secondary sources.

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Date Created
2015-05

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An Analysis of the Impact of Female Leadership on Corporate Social Responsibility

Description

This study aims to evaluate and explore whether a positive correlation exists between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, as well as its subsequent reasoning, while specifically focusing on female leaders within the upper management (i.e. board of directors and

This study aims to evaluate and explore whether a positive correlation exists between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, as well as its subsequent reasoning, while specifically focusing on female leaders within the upper management (i.e. board of directors and CEOs) of S&P 500 firms. Since several studies identify a positive relationship between female leadership and corporate social responsibility, our case study of IBM and PepsiCo aims to provide a real-life framework to these theoretical models. Ultimately, our case study does align with the findings of those models, yet also provides a unique perspective as to the reasoning for the difference in CSR outcomes, citing business strategy as opposed to altruism and other-orientation. Due to our limited sample size, our findings do not empirically support this notion, but instead offers a potential area for further research.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05