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Quiet Impact: Investigating the Relationship Between Introversion and Commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility

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This thesis explores the relationship between introversion and individual commitment to corporate social responsibility. Research was gathered from a survey that classifies respondents as introverts or extroverts, and analyzes perceptions and commitment to social responsibility both on an organizational and

This thesis explores the relationship between introversion and individual commitment to corporate social responsibility. Research was gathered from a survey that classifies respondents as introverts or extroverts, and analyzes perceptions and commitment to social responsibility both on an organizational and personal behavior level. Findings from the study show that introverts are not more likely than extroverts to prioritize social responsibility at work or through their personal lives. However, there is evidence in this study that introverts think about corporate social responsibility and its effects on business success in a different way than extroverts. Introverts focus on avoiding risk, and they may be more prone than extroverts to see business success and social responsibility as two opposing forces. Introverts also perceive a wider gap between the current state of prioritization for CSR responsibilities and what they feel this prioritization should be. This study has a number of practical implications for business leaders hoping to increase commitment to CSR within an organization while drawing on the strengths of each personality type. Recommendations for increasing commitment to CSR are based on survey findings and research from secondary sources.

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2015-05

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Corporate Responsibility and the 21s Century Business Model: Trends and Challenges

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For decades, corporate firms have included corporate responsibility initiatives in their regular business functions in an effort to communicate a priority toward the communities they operate in, rather than just the customers they serve. These actions \u2014 whether implemented through

For decades, corporate firms have included corporate responsibility initiatives in their regular business functions in an effort to communicate a priority toward the communities they operate in, rather than just the customers they serve. These actions \u2014 whether implemented through financial or human resources \u2014 have grown to be a common addition to business models across industries. In recent years, however, the simple addition of a community-oriented campaign to a firm's regular business proceedings have become less effective in positioning a firm as a devoted corporate citizen. Today, consumers have access to more information and opportunities for substitutes than ever before, and as they make buying decisions, they are interested in seeing the firms they support orient themselves at the heart of community engagement, rather than interacting with the community through passive support. This study and discussion highlights the trends that several corporate responsibility professionals have seen emerge in recent years regarding their respective employers' corporate responsibility initiatives. Thoughts and reactions from corporate responsibility managers representing financial, education, insurance, and technology companies will be synthesized and analyzed for trends and shared positive and negative experiences related to their common work in initiating corporate responsibility programs at their respective firms. The discussion will also illustrate the specific challenges each of the professionals face daily in implementing successful CR programs within their firms. In aggregate, this discussion will provide a comprehensive look at what exactly firms are doing in today's CR sphere: it will demonstrate what trends are working well, which have yet to be tailored to have the best impact, and what is to come of the corporate firm's relationship with its community.

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2018-05

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Next Generation Recruiting: Using Corporate Social Responsibility to Attract Top Talent

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Today’s job market favors the candidate as a result of the low unemployment rate in the United States. This requires companies to look beyond their typical recruiting techniques if they want to ensure they are hiring the best candidates after

Today’s job market favors the candidate as a result of the low unemployment rate in the United States. This requires companies to look beyond their typical recruiting techniques if they want to ensure they are hiring the best candidates after college in order to build their future leadership in the company. Throughout research for this thesis it became apparent that many of the recruiters surveyed during this study were not actively using Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in their recruiting tactics. In addition, a lot of the career pages of companies that actively recruit at Arizona State University do not even mention the topic. Throughout primary research of students that attend Arizona State University, surveys were able to draw conclusions on the type of students that prioritize Corporate Social Responsibility in their recruiting seasons. From these surveys, it was found that students with higher GPAs who are ethnically diverse, female, with more than one internship experience, or graduating within the next two years on average chose to prioritize Corporate Social Responsibility over other traditional “perks” of jobs. Following the collection of survey data, in order to get a more genuine understanding of what students are looking for, there was a focus group conducted with nine (9) W. P. Carey School of Business students. This allowed for there to be a guided conversation about Corporate Social Responsibility and allow students to share their feelings about the topic and how they prioritize it when looking for jobs. This, in combination with the surveys of recruiters and students, made it very clear about exactly the kind of students that recruiters should be targeting. Therefore, it has become apparent that if recruiters want to hire candidates who are more experienced, diverse, and with higher GPAs then they should be incorporating Corporate Social Responsibility into their recruiting techniques. Whether that is advertising it on their career pages and at career events, asking questions about it in interviews, or starting a conversation with students about it, this will allow recruiters to find those students with a genuine appreciation for the topic.

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2019-05