Matching Items (2)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

133611-Thumbnail Image.png

The Facebook Revolution: A Case Study in the Need for New Forms of Social Responsibility in the Way Private Owners Manage Essential Public Services.

Description

This paper uses Facebook as a case study for other technological and social media companies given factors presented by the Digital Age. Three different pillars are used to analyze the company. First an examination of the manipulation of users on

This paper uses Facebook as a case study for other technological and social media companies given factors presented by the Digital Age. Three different pillars are used to analyze the company. First an examination of the manipulation of users on Facebook by Russian actors is presented. Next, the paper examines whether Facebook is promoting civic participation for good. Lastly, an analyzation of the rising trend of hate speech and extremists using the site is presented. This examination of Facebook then posed three questions regarding companies in the Digital Age as a whole. The first was "What is the extent of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Digital Age?" The second was, "What special obligations do for-profit companies have when it comes to safeguarding the privacy of individuals, or at least insuring that their stored information does not harm them?". The last question presented was, "How Can the Profit Motive and Corporate Morality Co-Exist in the Digital Age?" The findings of this case study showed that due to different factors that are presented in the Digital Age, these ideals of Corporate Social Responsibility, Privacy and Corporate Morality may be even more challenging to uphold during this Age of Information. Due to this fact, companies such as Facebook have an even greater responsibility to abide by these ideals of Corporate Social Responsibility, Privacy and Corporate Morality. This is because of an even larger potential for negative effects due to technological change. Regardless of the possibility for regulation by government, third-party organization or by the organizations themselves, Digital Age Corporations have the duty to protect their users from harm and maintain these three ideals.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

136614-Thumbnail Image.png

Quiet Impact: Investigating the Relationship Between Introversion and Commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility

Description

This thesis explores the relationship between introversion and individual commitment to corporate social responsibility. Research was gathered from a survey that classifies respondents as introverts or extroverts, and analyzes perceptions and commitment to social responsibility both on an organizational and

This thesis explores the relationship between introversion and individual commitment to corporate social responsibility. Research was gathered from a survey that classifies respondents as introverts or extroverts, and analyzes perceptions and commitment to social responsibility both on an organizational and personal behavior level. Findings from the study show that introverts are not more likely than extroverts to prioritize social responsibility at work or through their personal lives. However, there is evidence in this study that introverts think about corporate social responsibility and its effects on business success in a different way than extroverts. Introverts focus on avoiding risk, and they may be more prone than extroverts to see business success and social responsibility as two opposing forces. Introverts also perceive a wider gap between the current state of prioritization for CSR responsibilities and what they feel this prioritization should be. This study has a number of practical implications for business leaders hoping to increase commitment to CSR within an organization while drawing on the strengths of each personality type. Recommendations for increasing commitment to CSR are based on survey findings and research from secondary sources.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2015-05