Matching Items (16)

Immortal Warrior Sky Falconer

Description

Immortal Warrior Sky Falconer is a seventeen-minute "proof of concept" animatic for a theoretical animated series. The thesis project was focused on the process of making such a product come

Immortal Warrior Sky Falconer is a seventeen-minute "proof of concept" animatic for a theoretical animated series. The thesis project was focused on the process of making such a product come to be. Through the two semesters I took ideas to my professor for approval starting with a basic pitch and slowly refined them into a singular product combination art, writing and sound effects. From script, to storyboard, to final cut, this project has been one of constant tweaking of the various components into the product you see today that is whole, but still has room to be built upon.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

135981-Thumbnail Image.png

Implementing ASU-VPL as an Open Robotics Platform Tool for Education

Description

Education in computer science is a difficult endeavor, with learning a new programing language being a barrier to entry, especially for college freshman and high school students. Learning a first

Education in computer science is a difficult endeavor, with learning a new programing language being a barrier to entry, especially for college freshman and high school students. Learning a first programming language requires understanding the syntax of the language, the algorithms to use, and any additional complexities the language carries. Often times this becomes a deterrent from learning computer science at all. Especially in high school, students may not want to spend a year or more simply learning the syntax of a programming language. In order to overcome these issues, as well as to mitigate the issues caused by Microsoft discontinuing their Visual Programming Language (VPL), we have decided to implement a new VPL, ASU-VPL, based on Microsoft's VPL. ASU-VPL provides an environment where users can focus on algorithms and worry less about syntactic issues. ASU-VPL was built with the concepts of Robot as a Service and workflow based development in mind. As such, ASU-VPL is designed with the intention of allowing web services to be added to the toolbox (e.g. WSDL and REST services). ASU-VPL has strong support for multithreaded operations, including event driven development, and is built with Microsoft VPL users in mind. It provides support for many different robots, including Lego's third generation robots, i.e. EV3, and any open platform robots. To demonstrate the capabilities of ASU-VPL, this paper details the creation of an Intel Edison based robot and the use of ASU-VPL for programming both the Intel based robot and an EV3 robot. This paper will also discuss differences between ASU-VPL and Microsoft VPL as well as differences between developing for the EV3 and for an open platform robot.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

133894-Thumbnail Image.png

Pandora: A Play by Abbey Toye

Description

Pandora is a play exploring our relationship with gendered technology through the lens of artificial intelligence. Can women be subjective under patriarchy? Do robots who look like women have subjectivity?

Pandora is a play exploring our relationship with gendered technology through the lens of artificial intelligence. Can women be subjective under patriarchy? Do robots who look like women have subjectivity? Hoping to create a better version of ourselves, The Engineer must navigate the loss of her creation, and Pandora must navigate their new world. The original premiere run was March 27-28, 2018, original cast: Caitlin Andelora, Rikki Tremblay, and Michael Tristano Jr.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

133613-Thumbnail Image.png

Design, Implementation, and Testing of a Force-Sensing Quadrupedal Laminate Robot

Description

In this article we present a low-cost force-sensing quadrupedal laminate robot platform. The robot has two degrees of freedom on each of four independent legs, allowing for a variety of

In this article we present a low-cost force-sensing quadrupedal laminate robot platform. The robot has two degrees of freedom on each of four independent legs, allowing for a variety of motion trajectories to be created at each leg, thus creating a rich control space to explore on a relatively low-cost robot. This platform allows a user to research complex motion and gait analysis control questions, and use different concepts in computer science and control theory methods to permit it to walk. The motion trajectory of each leg has been modeled in Python. Critical design considerations are: the complexity of the laminate design, the rigidity of the materials of which the laminate is constructed, the accuracy of the transmission to control each leg, and the design of the force sensing legs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

131375-Thumbnail Image.png

Creating a 2D Python Simulation for a Quadruped Robot to Simulate Balancing in Changing Ground Conditions

Description

In this article we present a program that is supplemental to a low-cost force-sensing quadrupedal laminate robot platform previously developed by Ben Shuch. The robot has four legs with two

In this article we present a program that is supplemental to a low-cost force-sensing quadrupedal laminate robot platform previously developed by Ben Shuch. The robot has four legs with two degrees of freedom apiece. Each leg is a four-bar mechanism controlled by two servo motors. The program that has been developed allows the user to predict the force distribution of the robot based on its configuration and the angle of the ground it is standing on. Through the use of this program, future students working on research involving this robot will be able to calculate the force distribution of the robot based on its configuration and generate ideal configurations of the robot using data gathered from force sensors attached to its feet.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Animal and Robotic Locomotion on Dry and Wet Granular Media

Description

Traditional wheeled robots struggle to traverse granular media such as sand or mud which has inspired the use of continuous tracks, legged, and various bio-inspired designs in recent robotics research.

Traditional wheeled robots struggle to traverse granular media such as sand or mud which has inspired the use of continuous tracks, legged, and various bio-inspired designs in recent robotics research. Animals can navigate the natural world with relative ease and one animal, the Basilisk lizard, can perform the amazing feat of bipedal water and land running. Through the observation and study of basilisk lizards of the common and plumed variety, inspiration and development of a robotic platform was completed. After fabricating the bio-inspired robot, parameters unchanged by the animals were varied to characterize the combined effects of stride length and frequency on average velocity. It was found that animals increased stride length at higher saturation levels of sand to increase their velocity rather than increase their step frequency. The BasiliskBot version one was unable to change its stride length as the wheel-legs or "whegs" of this version were set at four spokes. Bipedal running of the robot was slower than quadrupedal running due to sand reaction forces and tail drag. BasiliskBot version two was lighter than the first version and had a range of stride lengths tested with increasing spoke numbers from 3-7. At lower step frequencies and lower wheg numbers, higher average velocity could be achieved compared to higher wheg numbers despite the highest maximum velocity being achieved by the highest number of spokes. A comparison of transition strategies for common and plumed basilisks showed both species chose to jump and swim through water more often than jump and run across water which achieved the highest average velocity. Results of transition strategies study pertain to future developments of the robot for amphibious purposes. Weight experiments were performed to assess the ability of the robot to carry sensors and other payloads. Added weight increased the highest frequency allowable before failure, but also caused failure at low step frequencies that had not displayed failure previously.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

135476-Thumbnail Image.png

Development of Graphical User Interfaces and Algorithms for Controlling a Robotic Swarm

Description

The aim of this project was to develop user-friendly methods for programming and controlling a new type of small robot platform, called Pheeno, both individually and as part of a

The aim of this project was to develop user-friendly methods for programming and controlling a new type of small robot platform, called Pheeno, both individually and as part of a group. Two literature reviews are presented to justify the need for these robots and to discuss what other platforms have been developed for similar applications. In order to accomplish control of multiple robots work was done on controlling a single robot first. The response of a gripper arm attachment for the robot was smoothed, graphical user interfaces were developed, and commands were sent to a single robot using a video game controller. For command of multiple robots a class was developed in Python to make it simpler to send commands and keep track of different characteristics of each individual robot. A simple script was also created as a proof of concept to show how threading could be used to send different commands simultaneously to multiple robots in order to test algorithms on a group of robots. The class and two other scripts necessary for implementing the class are also presented to make it possible for future use of the given work.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

151780-Thumbnail Image.png

A modular ROS package for linear temporal logic based motion planning

Description

Objective of this thesis project is to build a prototype using Linear Temporal Logic specifications for generating a 2D motion plan commanding an iRobot to fulfill the specifications. This thesis

Objective of this thesis project is to build a prototype using Linear Temporal Logic specifications for generating a 2D motion plan commanding an iRobot to fulfill the specifications. This thesis project was created for Cyber Physical Systems Lab in Arizona State University. The end product of this thesis is creation of a software solution which can be used in the academia and industry for research in cyber physical systems related applications. The major features of the project are: creating a modular system for motion planning, use of Robot Operating System (ROS), use of triangulation for environment decomposition and using stargazer sensor for localization. The project is built on an open source software called ROS which provides an environment where it is very easy to integrate different modules be it software or hardware on a Linux based platform. Use of ROS implies the project or its modules can be adapted quickly for different applications as the need arises. The final software package created and tested takes a data file as its input which contains the LTL specifications, a symbols list used in the LTL and finally the environment polygon data containing real world coordinates for all polygons and also information on neighbors and parents of each polygon. The software package successfully ran the experiment of coverage, reachability with avoidance and sequencing.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

154664-Thumbnail Image.png

Interconnects and packaging to enable autonomous movable MEMS microelectrodes to record and stimulate neurons in deep brain structures

Description

Long-term monitoring of deep brain structures using microelectrode implants is critical for the success of emerging clinical applications including cortical neural prostheses, deep brain stimulation and other neurobiology studies such

Long-term monitoring of deep brain structures using microelectrode implants is critical for the success of emerging clinical applications including cortical neural prostheses, deep brain stimulation and other neurobiology studies such as progression of disease states, learning and memory, brain mapping etc. However, current microelectrode technologies are not capable enough of reaching those clinical milestones given their inconsistency in performance and reliability in long-term studies. In all the aforementioned applications, it is important to understand the limitations & demands posed by technology as well as biological processes. Recent advances in implantable Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology have tremendous potential and opens a plethora of opportunities for long term studies which were not possible before. The overall goal of the project is to develop large scale autonomous, movable, micro-scale interfaces which can seek and monitor/stimulate large ensembles of precisely targeted neurons and neuronal networks that can be applied for brain mapping in behaving animals. However, there are serious technical (fabrication) challenges related to packaging and interconnects, examples of which include: lack of current industry standards in chip-scale packaging techniques for silicon chips with movable microstructures, incompatible micro-bonding techniques to elongate current micro-electrode length to reach deep brain structures, inability to achieve hermetic isolation of implantable devices from biological tissue and fluids (i.e. cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood, etc.). The specific aims are to: 1) optimize & automate chip scale packaging of MEMS devices with unique requirements not amenable to conventional industry standards with respect to bonding, process temperature and pressure in order to achieve scalability 2) develop a novel micro-bonding technique to extend the length of current polysilicon micro-electrodes to reach and monitor deep brain structures 3) design & develop high throughput packaging mechanism for constructing a dense array of movable microelectrodes. Using a combination of unique micro-bonding technique which involves conductive thermosetting epoxy’s with hermetically sealed support structures and a highly optimized, semi-automated, 90-minute flip-chip packaging process, I have now extended the repertoire of previously reported movable microelectrode arrays to bond conventional stainless steel and Pt/Ir microelectrode arrays of desired lengths to steerable polysilicon shafts. I tested scalable prototypes in rigorous bench top tests including Impedance measurements, accelerated aging and non-destructive testing to assess electrical and mechanical stability of micro-bonds under long-term implantation. I propose a 3D printed packaging method allows a wide variety of electrode configurations to be realized such as a rectangular or circular array configuration or other arbitrary geometries optimal for specific regions of the brain with inter-electrode distance as low as 25 um with an unprecedented capability of seeking and recording/stimulating targeted single neurons in deep brain structures up to 10 mm deep (with 6 μm displacement resolution). The advantage of this computer controlled moveable deep brain electrodes facilitates potential capabilities of moving past glial sheath surrounding microelectrodes to restore neural connection, counter the variabilities in signal amplitudes, and enable simultaneous recording/stimulation at precisely targeted layers of brain.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

153297-Thumbnail Image.png

A variational approach to planning, allocation and mapping in robot swarms using infinite dimensional models

Description

This thesis considers two problems in the control of robotic swarms. Firstly, it addresses a trajectory planning and task allocation problem for a swarm of resource-constrained robots that cannot localize

This thesis considers two problems in the control of robotic swarms. Firstly, it addresses a trajectory planning and task allocation problem for a swarm of resource-constrained robots that cannot localize or communicate with each other and that exhibit stochasticity in their motion and task switching policies. We model the population dynamics of the robotic swarm as a set of advection-diffusion- reaction (ADR) partial differential equations (PDEs).

Specifically, we consider a linear parabolic PDE model that is bilinear in the robots' velocity and task-switching rates. These parameters constitute a set of time-dependent control variables that can be optimized and transmitted to the robots prior to their deployment or broadcasted in real time. The planning and allocation problem can then be formulated as a PDE-constrained optimization problem, which we solve using techniques from optimal control. Simulations of a commercial pollination scenario validate the ability of our control approach to drive a robotic swarm to achieve predefined spatial distributions of activity over a closed domain, which may contain obstacles. Secondly, we consider a mapping problem wherein a robotic swarm is deployed over a closed domain and it is necessary to reconstruct the unknown spatial distribution of a feature of interest. The ADR-based primitives result in a coefficient identification problem for the corresponding system of PDEs. To deal with the inherent ill-posedness of the problem, we frame it as an optimization problem. We validate our approach through simulations and show that reconstruction of the spatially-dependent coefficient can be achieved with considerable accuracy using temporal information alone.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014