Matching Items (9)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

151202-Thumbnail Image.png

Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotubes-zinc oxide structure by drop-drying and ink jet printing

Description

This thesis elaborates the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and it is discussed in two parts. In the first part of the thesis, two types of CNTs inks for inkjet materials printer are prepared. They are both chemical stable and

This thesis elaborates the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and it is discussed in two parts. In the first part of the thesis, two types of CNTs inks for inkjet materials printer are prepared. They are both chemical stable and printable, effective and easily made. The sheet resistance of printed films decreases exponentially as the number of layers increases. In the second part of this study, CNTs/ZnO composite structures are fabricated to understand the electronic and optical properties. The materials were deposited by two different methods: drop-drying and RF magnetic sputtering system on flexible polymer substrates. To further increase the conductivity of the various layers of deposited CNTs films, electrical and optical characterizations are also done. This study establishes CNTs as a multi-functional semitransparent conductor, which can be deposited at room-temperature with other transparent conductive oxide (TCO) composites for application in flexible electronics and printed circuit and sensors.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

152042-Thumbnail Image.png

Effect of microwave annealing on low energy ion implanted wafer

Description

Rapid processing and reduced end-of-range diffusion effects demonstrate that susceptor-assisted microwave annealing is an efficient processing alternative for electrically activating dopants and removing ion-implantation damage in ion-implanted semiconductors. Sheet resistance and Hall measurements provide evidence of electrical activation. Raman spectroscopy

Rapid processing and reduced end-of-range diffusion effects demonstrate that susceptor-assisted microwave annealing is an efficient processing alternative for electrically activating dopants and removing ion-implantation damage in ion-implanted semiconductors. Sheet resistance and Hall measurements provide evidence of electrical activation. Raman spectroscopy and ion channeling analysis monitor the extent of ion implantation damage and recrystallization. The presence of damage and defects in ion implanted silicon, and the reduction of the defects as a result of annealing, is observed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, moreover, the boron implanted silicon is further investigated by cross-section transmission electron microscopy. When annealing B+ implanted silicon, the dissolution of small extended defects and growth of large extended defects result in reduced crystalline quality that hinders the electrical activation process. Compared to B+ implanted silicon, phosphorus implanted samples experience more effective activation and achieve better crystalline quality. Comparison of end-of-range dopants diffusion resulting from microwave annealing and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) is done using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Results from microwave annealed P+ implanted samples show that almost no diffusion occurs during time periods required for complete dopant activation and silicon recrystallization. The relative contributions to heating of the sample, by a SiC susceptor, and by Si self-heating in the microwave anneal, were also investigated. At first 20s, the main contributor to the sample's temperature rise is Si self-heating by microwave absorption.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

149945-Thumbnail Image.png

Influence of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy stainless steels

Description

Increasing demand for high strength powder metallurgy (PM) steels has resulted in the development of dual phase PM steels. In this work, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy

Increasing demand for high strength powder metallurgy (PM) steels has resulted in the development of dual phase PM steels. In this work, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 538oC in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite hardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties. Due to the complex non-uniform stresses and strains associated with conventional nanoindentation, micropillar compression has become an attractive method to probe local mechanical behavior while limiting strain gradients and contributions from surrounding features. In this study, micropillars of ferrite and martensite were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels. Compression testing was conducted using a nanoindenter equipped with a flat punch indenter. The stress-strain curves of the individual microconstituents were calculated from the load-displacement curves less the extraneous displacements of the system. Using a rule of mixtures approach in conjunction with porosity corrections, the mechanical properties of ferrite and martensite were combined for comparison to tensile tests of the bulk material, and reasonable agreement was found for the ultimate tensile strength. Micropillar compression experiments of both as sintered and thermally aged material allowed for investigation of the effect of thermal aging.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

149810-Thumbnail Image.png

Susceptor assisted microwave annealing of ion implanted silicon

Description

This thesis discusses the use of low temperature microwave anneal as an alternative technique to recrystallize materials damaged or amorphized due to implantation techniques. The work focuses on the annealing of high-Z doped Si wafers that are incapable of attaining

This thesis discusses the use of low temperature microwave anneal as an alternative technique to recrystallize materials damaged or amorphized due to implantation techniques. The work focuses on the annealing of high-Z doped Si wafers that are incapable of attaining high temperatures required for recrystallizing the damaged implanted layers by microwave absorption The increasing necessity for quicker and more efficient processing techniques motivates study of the use of a single frequency applicator microwave cavity along with a Fe2O3 infused SiC-alumina susceptor/applicator as an alternative post implantation process. Arsenic implanted Si samples of different dopant concentrations and implantation energies were studied pre and post microwave annealing. A set of as-implanted Si samples were also used to assess the effect of inactive dopants against presence of electrically active dopants on the recrystallization mechanisms. The extent of damage repair and Si recrystallization of the damage caused by arsenic and Si implantation of Si is determined by cross-section transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Dopant activation is evaluated for the As implanted Si by sheet resistance measurements. For the same, secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis is used to compare the extent of diffusion that results from such microwave annealing with that experienced when using conventional rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Results show that compared to susceptor assisted microwave annealing, RTA caused undesired dopant diffusion. The SiC-alumina susceptor plays a predominant role in supplying heat to the Si substrate, and acts as an assistor that helps a high-Z dopant like arsenic to absorb the microwave energy using a microwave loss mechanism which is a combination of ionic and dipole losses. Comparisons of annealing of the samples were done with and without the use of the susceptor, and confirm the role played by the susceptor, since the samples donot recrystallize when the surface heating mechanism provided by the susceptor is not incorporated. Variable frequency microwave annealing was also performed over the as-implanted Si samples for durations and temperatures higher than the single frequency microwave anneal, but only partial recrystallization of the damaged layer was achieved.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

150889-Thumbnail Image.png

Characterization of local deformation in Pb-free solder joints using three dimensional (3D) X-ray microtomography

Description

Pb-free solder joints are commonly used as interconnects in semiconductor packaging. One of the major defects affecting the mechanical performance of solder joints are reflow pores that form during processing. These pores exhibit significant variability in size and distribution, and

Pb-free solder joints are commonly used as interconnects in semiconductor packaging. One of the major defects affecting the mechanical performance of solder joints are reflow pores that form during processing. These pores exhibit significant variability in size and distribution, and understanding the effects of pore geometry on failure is an important reliability concern. In this thesis, the pore microstructures of solder joint samples and the localized plastic deformation around individual pores was characterized in 3D using lab scale X-ray Microtomography. To observe the deformation of a solder joint in 3D, a solder joint was imaged with Microtomography after reflow and then deformed in shear in several loading steps with additional tomography data taken between each. The 3D tomography datasets were then segmented using the 3D Livewire technique into regions corresponding to solder and pores, and used to generate 3D models of the joint at each strain value using Mimics software. The extent of deformation of individual pores in the joint as a function of strain was quantified using sphericity measurements, and correlated with the observed cracking in the joint. In addition, the error inherent in the data acquisition and 3D modeling process was also quantified. The progression of damage observed with X-ray Microtomography was then used to validate the deformation and failure predicted by a Finite Element (FE) simulation. The FE model was based on the as-reflowed tomography data, and incorporated a ductile damage failure model to simulate fracture. Using the measured sphericity change and cracking information obtained from the tomography data, the FE model is shown to correctly capture the broad plastic deformation and strain localization seen in the actual joint, as well as the crack propagation. Lastly, Digital Image Correlation was investigated as a method of obtaining improved local strain measurements in 3D. This technique measures the displacement of the inherent microstructural features of the joint, and can give localized strain measurements that can be directly comparable to that predicted by modeling. The technique is demonstrated in 2D on Pb-Sn solder, and example 3D data is presented for future analysis.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

149459-Thumbnail Image.png

Adhesion in a copper-ruthenium multilayer nano-scale structure and the use of a Miedema plot to select a diffusion barrier metal for copper metallization

Description

Miedema's plot is used to select the Cu/metal barrier for Cu metallization.The Cu/metal barrier system selected should have positive heat of formation (Hf) so that there is no intermixing between the two layers. In this case, Ru is chosen as

Miedema's plot is used to select the Cu/metal barrier for Cu metallization.The Cu/metal barrier system selected should have positive heat of formation (Hf) so that there is no intermixing between the two layers. In this case, Ru is chosen as a potential candidate, and then the barrier properties of sputtered Cu/Ru thin films on thermally grown SiO2 substrates are investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and electrical resistivity measurement. The Cu/Ru/SiO2 samples are analyzed prior to and after vacuum annealing at various temperatures of 400, 500, and 600 oC and at different interval of times of 0.5, 1 and 2 hrs for each temperature. Backscattering analysis indicate that both the copper and ruthenium thin films are thermally stable at high temperature of 600 oC, without any interdiffusion and chemical reaction between Cu and Ru thin films. No new phase formation is observed in any of the Cu/Ru/SiO2 samples. The XRD data indicate no new phase formation in any of the annealed Cu/Ru/SiO2 samples and confirmed excellent thermal stability of Cu on Ru layer. The electrical resistivity measurement indicated that the electrical resistivity value of the copper thin films annealed at 400, 500, and 600 oC is essentially constant and the copper films are thermally stable on Ru, no reaction occurs between copper films and Ru the layer. Cu/Ru/SiO2 multilayered thin film samples have been shown to possess good mechanical strength and adhesion between the Cu and Ru layers compared to the Cu/SiO2 thin film samples. The strength evaluation is carried out under static loading conditions such as nanoindentation testing. In this study, evaluation and comparison is donebased on the dynamic deformation behavior of Cu/Ru/SiO2 and Cu/SiO2 samples under scratch loading condition as a measure of tribological properties. Finally, the deformation behavior under static and dynamic loading conditions is understood using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the focused ionbeam imaging microscope (FIB) for topographical and cross-sectional imaging respectively.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2010

149911-Thumbnail Image.png

The synthesis and characterization of Au-core/LDH-shell nanoparticles

Description

In recent years, the field of nanomedicine has progressed at an astonishing rate, particularly with respect to applications in cancer treatment and molecular imaging. Although organic systems have been the frontrunners, inorganic systems have also begun to show promise, especially

In recent years, the field of nanomedicine has progressed at an astonishing rate, particularly with respect to applications in cancer treatment and molecular imaging. Although organic systems have been the frontrunners, inorganic systems have also begun to show promise, especially those based upon silica and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). Many of these systems are being designed for simultaneous therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities, thus coining the term, theranostics. A unique class of inorganic systems that shows great promise as theranostics is that of layered double hydroxides (LDH). By synthesis of a core/shell structures, e.g. a gold nanoparticle (NP) core and LDH shell, the multifunctional theranostic may be developed without a drastic increase in the structural complexity. To demonstrate initial proof-of-concept of a potential (inorganic) theranostic platform, a Au-core/LDH-shell nanovector has been synthesized and characterized. The LDH shell was heterogeneously nucleated and grown on the surface of silica coated gold NPs via a coprecipitation method. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was introduced in the initial synthesis steps to improve crystallinity and colloidal stability. Additionally, during synthesis, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was intercalated into the interlayer spacing of the LDH. In contrast to the PEG stabilization, a post synthesis citric acid treatment was used as a method to control the size and short-term stability. The heterogeneous core-shell system was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD). A preliminary in vitro study carried out with the assistance of Dr. Kaushal Rege's group at Arizona State University was to demonstrate the endocytosis capability of homogeneously-grown LDH NPs. The DLS measurements of the core-shell NPs indicated an average particle size of 212nm. The PXRD analysis showed that PEG greatly improved the crystallinity of the system while simultaneously preventing aggregation of the NPs. The preliminary in vitro fluorescence microscopy revealed a moderate uptake of homogeneous LDH NPs into the cells.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

151348-Thumbnail Image.png

Growth of InGaN nanorings via metal organic chemical vapor deposition

Description

III-Nitride nanostructures have been an active area of research recently due to their ability to tune their optoelectronic properties. Thus far work has been done on InGaN quantum dots, nanowires, nanopillars, amongst other structures, but this research reports the creation

III-Nitride nanostructures have been an active area of research recently due to their ability to tune their optoelectronic properties. Thus far work has been done on InGaN quantum dots, nanowires, nanopillars, amongst other structures, but this research reports the creation of a new type of InGaN nanostructure, nanorings. Hexagonal InGaN nanorings were formed using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition through droplet epitaxy. The nanorings were thoroughly analyzed using x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Nanorings with high indium incorporation were achieved with indium content up to 50% that was then controlled using the growth time, temperature, In/Ga ratio and III/N ratio. The analysis showed that the nanoring shape is able to incorporate more indium than other nanostructures, due to the relaxing mechanism involved in the formation of the nanoring. The ideal conditions were determined to be growth of 30 second droplets with a growth time of 1 minute 30 seconds at 770 C to achieve the most well developed rings with the highest indium concentration.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

153981-Thumbnail Image.png

Modified equivalent circuit for organic solar cells

Description

In this work a newly fabricated organic solar cell based on a composite of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and regioregular poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with an added interfacial layer of AgOx in between the PEDOT:PSS layer and

In this work a newly fabricated organic solar cell based on a composite of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and regioregular poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with an added interfacial layer of AgOx in between the PEDOT:PSS layer and the ITO layer is investigated. Previous equivalent circuit models are discussed and an equivalent circuit model is proposed for the fabricated device. Incorporation of the AgOx interfacial layer shows an increase in fill factor (by 33%) and power conversion efficiency (by 28%). Moreover proper correlation has been achieved between the experimental and simulated I-V plots. The simulation shows that device characteristics can be explained with accuracy by the proposed model.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015