Matching Items (13)

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ASU Hockey: How the Sun Devils became a Division I team

Description

On Nov. 18, 2014, the Arizona State University announced its club hockey team would be elevated from club to varsity status begin in 2015-16. ASU's process lasted merely four months,

On Nov. 18, 2014, the Arizona State University announced its club hockey team would be elevated from club to varsity status begin in 2015-16. ASU's process lasted merely four months, spring-boarding off a July article that quoted athletic director Ray Anderson as saying all the program needed was money in order to make happen. This thesis explains what happened between that July story and the November announcement. Almost immediately the school received calls from interested donors who said they were willing to completely fund the creation of a men's hockey program. In the end, a group led by Milwaukee businessman Don Mullett donated $32 million to ASU. The thesis also explains the challenges that are still to come for ASU. Those include the arena in which ASU will play, the conference it will join, the women's sport ASU will add in order to stay compliant with Title IX and whether the program will be profitable for the University, among other things. ASU will begin play as a Division I program, the southernmost and westernmost school in the continental United States. It truly is, as Anderson wanted, an example of ASU being "entrepreneurial."

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Effectiveness of ASU Wellness' Sexual Violence Prevention Initiatives

Description

Sexual violence is a serious issue, particularly on college campuses, and many sexual assaults among college students involve alcohol consumption. Universities have begun implementing sexual violence prevention programs on their

Sexual violence is a serious issue, particularly on college campuses, and many sexual assaults among college students involve alcohol consumption. Universities have begun implementing sexual violence prevention programs on their campuses, but many do not examine their programs to determine if they are actually effective in increasing students' knowledge on consent and therefore reducing rates of sexual violence on their campuses. This study examines a sexual violence prevention program at Arizona State University called Consent 101, given by the ASU Wellness Department. This research seeks to determine if attending the presentation increases students' knowledge about the conditions of consent; specifically, if students are more likely to correctly answer a question regarding sobriety and consent after viewing the presentation. The hypothesis is that attending the Consent 101 presentation increases the likelihood that students will perceive that people must be sober in order to consent to sexual activities. A survey was used to test students' knowledge about consent and sexual violence, as well as their attitudes. Some students took the survey prior to attending the presentation while others took it after, allowing the groups to be compared to determine effectiveness. This study specifically focuses on whether students correctly choose true, incorrectly choose false, or choose don't know when given the statement "people must be sober in order to give valid consent to sex". There were 685 participants in the study. The "before" group contained 59% of the total participants, while the "after" group contained 41%. In the before group, 87.1% correctly answered true, 6.43% incorrectly answered false, and 6.18% answered don't know. In the after group, 85.71% answered true, 12.09% answered false, and 2.13% answered don't know. The results were significant and the hypothesis was not supported, meaning students were more likely to incorrectly answer the question after the presentation than before. There are multiple explanations for why this was found, including: different pre- and post-groups, misinterpreting the question and resistance to consent education. Ideas for future research and ways to increase effectiveness are provided.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Arizona State University: Water Treatment, Reclamation & Sustainability

Description

The thesis outlines five feasible technologies that can be implemented to assist Arizona State University (ASU) in its attempt to increase its water sustainability practices. After collaborating with internal contacts

The thesis outlines five feasible technologies that can be implemented to assist Arizona State University (ASU) in its attempt to increase its water sustainability practices. After collaborating with internal contacts from ASU's Sustainability department, a plan was initiated to research, inform, and recommend the best technological solution and potential vendor for ASU. Information on the vendor is included in the analysis describing the company's history, its service offerings, and application of the technology mentioned using case studies. Potential vendors were contact by phone and additional research was conducted using the each of the company's website to gather more information such a charts and graphs. ASU's current negotiations with its main vendor, Sustainable Water, assisted in establishing benchmarks needed to be able to compare other potential vendors. Each technology was researched extensively using metrics such as energy efficiency, aesthetics, footprint, purification capacity, and odor. The team had difficulties gathering specific data due to the hesitations of companies divulging proprietary information. As much information was gathered to analyze and provide a comparison with each vendor using a ranked and weighted system. Rating the technologies took into considerations the needs of ASU, the offerings of the potential vendor, and the technological capacities and capabilities. The technologies mentioned each had distinct features differing it from one another. However, each technology also had its tradeoffs. Ultimately, it was found that the most feasible, realistic and most aesthetically pleasing solution was Sustainable Water. After careful analysis, it is recommended to continue discussions with Sustainable Water to meet the needs and goals of ASU's water sustainability initiatives.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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How the Student Body Is Affected by ASU Football

Description

I am a former Arizona State football player and I wanted to do my own research on how the ASU football program affects the student body. I believe that college

I am a former Arizona State football player and I wanted to do my own research on how the ASU football program affects the student body. I believe that college football is one of the great experiences for any student. This is why I wanted to see what the students think about the football program at ASU and if I could find ways to make their experience better. I looked into past studies to find that there are many positive correlations between successful college football programs and student life. Studies indicated that it is beneficial for universities to invest in their football programs. To study this at ASU I created a survey that asked ASU students a few questions about themselves and how they felt ASU football affected their day-to-day lives through a Strongly Disagree, Disagree, Neutral, Agree, Strongly Agree format. I then put in a response portion at the end if they wanted to suggest anything that could be done better for the ASU football program when it came to their students. The results that I received from the survey showed that the students cared about football and that they thought football was an overall positive experience for them. The alarming point that the survey brought up was that not many students were attending the home games during the season. In fact, 25% of the student respondents did not go to a single home game in 2016. This was troubling to me and I looked in the worded responses to get answers as to why this was happening. Fortunately, the student respondents were very descriptive in what they believed the football program could be doing better. The responses discussed how a lack of tradition, lack of community outreach, lack of incentives/emphasis on fan experience and more were the reasons as to why students did not feel like going to the home games. I concluded that in order for ASU to attract more students to the home games that they need to have more student events around game week, reach out to the students more through their players, and built a connect between the football team and the ASU student body.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Creating Sustainability at ASU: Closing the Gap Between Concept and Application

Description

This thesis is exploring the potential disconnect between the operational and cultural parts in the making of sustainability at Arizona State University (ASU) to find the disconnect in operational goals,

This thesis is exploring the potential disconnect between the operational and cultural parts in the making of sustainability at Arizona State University (ASU) to find the disconnect in operational goals, student engagement, and thus student behavior in building sustainability at the university. To do so, I compare and contrast how ASU, Northern Arizona University (NAU), and the University of Arizona (UA) define, create, and demonstrate sustainability in their university’s culture and campus engagement programs. I first define what “culture” is in this study to provide context on how the word is being applied. Next, I assess how culture is reflected in the mission, vision, and/or goals of each university to set the tone for how the university intends to shape the culture of student experience through its services, as well as provide context where sustainability concepts may fit within. Then I assess what sustainability is demonstrated and defined as at each university. To thread each of these components together, I compare and contrast campus sustainability engagement programs at ASU, NAU, and UA based on the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS) reports produced by The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education’s (AASHE), as engagement programs are a reflection of the university’s vision, goals, and values brought from theory to practice. My findings are demonstrated in the form of a policy analysis, followed by recommendations on closing the gap where engagement programs and opportunities are potentially missing. These recommendations are intended to advance a stronger culture of sustainability on campus at ASU.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Impacts of understanding conation on student satisfaction with engineering programs

Description

Engineering education has long sought to incorporate greater diversity into engineering programs to prepare the profession to meet the engineering challenges of society. Increasing or retaining the conative diversity of

Engineering education has long sought to incorporate greater diversity into engineering programs to prepare the profession to meet the engineering challenges of society. Increasing or retaining the conative diversity of engineering programs may help extend other kinds of diversity in the profession as well (Marburger, 2004). One measure of conation is the Kolbe ATM index.
Kolbe ATM is an index developed by Kathy Kolbe to measure the conative traits on an individual. The index assigns each individual a value in four categories, or Action Modes, that indicates their level of insistence on a scale of 1 to 10 in that Action Mode (Kolbe, 2004). The four Action Modes are:

• Fact Finder – handling of information or facts
• Follow Thru – need to pattern or organize
• Quick Start – management of risk or uncertainty
• Implementor – interaction with space or tangibles

The Kolbe A (TM) index assigns each individual a value that indicates their level of insistence with 1-3 representing resistant, preventing problems in a particular Action Mode; 4-6 indicating accommodation, flexibility in a particular Action Mode; and 7-10 indicating insistence in an Action Mode, initiating solutions in that Action Mode (Kolbe, 2004).

To promote retention of conative diversity, this study examines conative diversity in two engineering student populations, a predominately freshmen population at Chandler Gilbert Community College and a predominately junior population at Arizona State University. Students in both population took a survey that asked them to self-report their GPA, satisfaction with required courses in their major, Kolbe ATM conative index, and how much their conative traits help them in each of the classes on the survey. The classes in the survey included two junior level classes at ASU, Engineering Business Practices and Structural Analysis; as well as four freshmen engineering classes, Physics Lecture, Physics Lab, English Composition, and Calculus I.

This study finds that student satisfaction has no meaningful correlation with student GPA.
The study also finds that engineering programs have a dearth of resistant Fact Finders from the freshmen level on and losses resistant Follow Thrus and insistent Quick Starts as time progresses. Students whose conative indices align well with the structure of the engineering program tend to consider their conative traits helpful to them in their engineering studies. Students whose conative indices misalign with the structure of the program report that they consider their strengths less helpful to them in their engineering studies.
This study recommends further research into the relationship between satisfaction with major and conation and into perceived helpfulness of conative traits by students. Educators should continue to use Kolbe A (TM) in the classroom and perform further research on the impacts of conation on diversity in engineering programs.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Threes Get Degrees? Evaluating the Performance of AP-3 Students and AP Credit Acceptance Policy at ASU

Description

The goal of this study is to test the assumption that an AP score of 3 is equivalent to a C and gain an understanding of how AP-3 students are

The goal of this study is to test the assumption that an AP score of 3 is equivalent to a C and gain an understanding of how AP-3 students are performing academically at ASU and how to interpret a 3 when evaluating ASU AP credit acceptance policy. Of primary interest is comparing the performance of AP-3 students to those non-AP students that got a C or higher in the corresponding course. To accomplish this, a tabular analysis of academic performance by AP score is conducted using aggregate student data from the ASU 2012-2014 cohorts. Among the performances considered are GPA, time to graduation, performance in the corresponding and following course at ASU, and more. Following this, a model is estimated for the impact that a 3 has on a student’s time to graduation when compared to non-AP students that got a C in the corresponding course.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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FIRMA: Force Impact Recognition Mouth Guard for Athletes, a Validation Study

Description

Concussions and traumatic brain injuries are mechanical events which can derive from no specific activity or event. However, these injuries occur often during athletic and sporting events but many athletes

Concussions and traumatic brain injuries are mechanical events which can derive from no specific activity or event. However, these injuries occur often during athletic and sporting events but many athletes experiencing these symptoms go undiagnosed and continue playing without proper medical attention. The current gold standard for diagnosing athletes with concussions is to have medical professionals on the sidelines of events to perform qualitative standardized assessments which may not be performed frequently enough and are not specialized for each athlete. The purpose of this report is to discuss a study sanctioned by Arizona State University's Project HoneyBee and additional affiliations to validate a third-party mouth guard device product to recognize and detect force impacts blown to an athlete's head during athletic activity. Current technology in health monitoring medical devices can allow users to apply this device as an additional safety mechanism for early concussion awareness and diagnosis. This report includes the materials and methods used for experimentation, the discussion of its results, and the complications which occurred and areas for improvement during the preliminary efforts of this project. Participants in the study were five non-varsity ASU Wrestling athletes who volunteered to wear a third-party mouth guard device during sparring contact at practice. Following a needed calibration period for the devices, results were recorded both through visual observation and with the mouth guard devices using an accelerometer and gyroscope. This study provided a sound understanding for the operation and functionality of the mouth guard devices. The mouth guard devices have the capability to provide fundamental avenues of research for future investigations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Dispatches from the Frontlines of a University’s Approach to Cyber Assault

Description

With this research and creative project, I aim to accomplish the following: first, I narrate my own experience as a victim of cyberbullying and the jumbled, inadequate response from my

With this research and creative project, I aim to accomplish the following: first, I narrate my own experience as a victim of cyberbullying and the jumbled, inadequate response from my university; second, I assemble a literature review of best practices for university responses to student reports of cyberbullying and cyber assault; third, I offer a call to action for universities to adopt the best practices to deter cyber assaults and learn how to listen and respond to victims

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Beyond Business: Life and Leadership Secrets From A Young Entrepreneur

Description

A fun, interactive, and practical motivational speaking package designed to inspire and encourage high school and college students, as well as young adults, to achieve success and discover their leadershi

A fun, interactive, and practical motivational speaking package designed to inspire and encourage high school and college students, as well as young adults, to achieve success and discover their leadership potential. Using secrets learned from starting my own business, Board Blazers LED Underglow Skateboard Lighting, and performing as Drum Major of the 400+ member ASU Sun Devil Marching Band, I share tips and tricks that can be applied in everyday life. Topics include surviving in difficult leadership situations unique to young leaders, celebrity confidence secrets, and creating infectious enthusiasm while working on a team.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05