Matching Items (14)

Jayson Matthews Oral History Interview

Description

Interview with Jayson Matthews, the Director of Ending Hunger for Valley of the Sun United Way

Jayson Matthews is the Director of Enduring Hunger for Valley of the Sun United Way.

Interview with Jayson Matthews, the Director of Ending Hunger for Valley of the Sun United Way

Jayson Matthews is the Director of Enduring Hunger for Valley of the Sun United Way. Growing up in poverty has given Jayson a unique perspective that focuses on less fortunate communities. His emphasis has been giving those who are most financially challenged access to fresh, local food. Coordinating support and funds to end hunger within Maricopa County has been a challenge but it has developed Jayson’s abilities to orient his goals while still being grounded in the community. One of his biggest concerns for this project is food insecurity, or the inability to have access to food. It is message that has been stigmatized that has prevented many from fighting poverty. His organization seeks to remedy this problem through a support network so that those who are struggling have a place to get food. This way these members can make better decisions for themselves and their families.

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Date Created
  • 2015-07-31

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Sustainability Practices of University Food Pantries in the US

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The objective of this study was to evaluate sustainability knowledge and practices in place at university-associated food pantries across the United States. A survey was sent to university- associated food

The objective of this study was to evaluate sustainability knowledge and practices in place at university-associated food pantries across the United States. A survey was sent to university- associated food pantries and responses were collected at a rate of 25% (n=84 of 326) to assess the knowledge and practices of this topic. The pantries surveyed were chosen solely based on ability to contact through email (emails were retrieved from online sources) and about 50% of the 680 university-associated pantries in the United States were sent the survey. The data was analyzed by quantifying the qualitative responses to the 9 sustainability- rated questions addressing zero- waste practice, barriers to offering sustainably sourced foods, types of sustainable donations, desire for sustainable products, and client demand for sustainable products and practices were posed to pantries. Results from this study provided insight into awareness of sustainability in these pantries and also assessed what sustainability practices are already being practiced by these pantries. Among those surveyed, a low percentage of university-associated pantries actually provide sustainably sourced foods (9.5%), but given the choice about a third (38.1%) would choose to offer these foods. It was reported that availability and cost were perceived as main barriers to providing sustainably sourced foods and that a small proportion of pantries teach their clients about zero waste practices, compost, and recycling. There is little client concern about this issue. Most pantries reported recycling more often than composting and also reported participating in some zero-waste practices. These results are unique to this study as not much research has been done in this area to assess environmental sustainability awareness in university-associated food pantries. Further research is required to further evaluate pantries across the nation as this sample size is approximately 12% of all university- associated pantries in the United States.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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COVID-19 Pandemic One Year Later: Food Insecurity and Assistance in Arizona

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The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020 and the resulting closures of schools, businesses, and restaurants led to a massive economic disruption in Arizona. The unemployment rate at

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020 and the resulting closures of schools, businesses, and restaurants led to a massive economic disruption in Arizona. The unemployment rate at its peak reached 14.2% (April 2020) - a level even higher than during the great recession of 2008. High unemployment rates, coupled with a breakdown of local and national food supply chains, led to a remarkable increase in food insecurity rates among Arizona households. More than a year later, as vaccines became widely available and restrictions were lifted, schools and business began to reopen, and most activities slowly returned to pre-pandemic standards. The effects of the pandemic on food insecurity and food-related behaviors, however, might have long-lasting effects. This brief describes levels of food insecurity, food assistance program participation, job disruption, and food related behaviors among 814 households in Arizona, in the 12 months preceding the pandemic (March 2019 – March 2020) and approximately one year after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic ( January 2021 –April 2021). Data collection took place between April and May 2021.

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Date Created
  • 2021-08

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Exploring Food Rescue Programs: Learning From Successful Experiences in Phoenix, Arizona, and New York City

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According to the United States Department of Agriculture, "food insecure homes" are households that are at times unable to acquire enough food to met the needs of their members. During

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, "food insecure homes" are households that are at times unable to acquire enough food to met the needs of their members. During the year 2010, this designation applied to roughly 14.5% of American households. In Arizona, the situation is even direr, with nearly 1 in 5 children falling into the range of food insecurity. These alarming statistics appear even graver in the light of the staggering amount of food that is wasted in America. In an attempt to combat both the problems of food insecurity and food waste, organizations have begun to focus their energy on "rescuing and repurposing food." In other words, these organization take prepared and perishable food from one location where it would go to waste, and redistribute it to places that it will be consumed, such as soup kitchens and shelters. The purpose of this thesis is to fully explore the successful workings of Waste Not, Inc. in Phoenix, AZ, and City Harvest in New York City, NY, and then make necessary critiques and draw implications for future food rescue programs.

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  • 2012-05

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The Associations Between Food Insecurity, Weight Status and Emotional Eating

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The objective of this study was to access whether there were any associations between food insecurity, weight status and emotional eating for adults and youth, and to discover whether emotional

The objective of this study was to access whether there were any associations between food insecurity, weight status and emotional eating for adults and youth, and to discover whether emotional eating was prevalent for both age groups. By gathering participants from six various low-income housing communities throughout the Phoenix, Arizona, the researchers were able to gather data from 114 participants, 57 adults and 57 youth. The participants were a convenience sample, and were recruited by flyers sent via the mail and door-to-door announcements in the spring and summer of 2014. The adult and youth were asked to complete a survey that was part of a larger study, which included the Weight-Related Eating Questionnaire to access the participants' emotional eating. The participants' height and weight were measured manually and were integrated into the BMI system, and the participants' food insecurity statuses were validated using the US Household Food Security Survey. The results of the study illustrated associations between food insecurity and emotional eating for adults, but not for youth. In addition, there were no associations between adults' emotional eating and their child's emotional eating. The results from this study were consisted with the current research examining the associations of food insecurity and emotional eating, where there is only a correlation between food insecurity and emotional eating for adults. However, this study was not consistent with past research accessing the associations between adults' emotional eating and their child's emotional eating since this study found no relationship between the two. Being that a cross-sectional survey-based research was incorporated into this study, further research needs to explore on food insecurity, weight status and emotional eating to determine their causality.

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Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Working towards Garden of Eden: Developing practical solutions to combat food insecurity in food deserts

Description

Food deserts and food insecurity can negatively impact the health of communities. Urban farming, specifically with aeroponics systems, could be a possible solution in alleviating food insecurity in food deserts.

Food deserts and food insecurity can negatively impact the health of communities. Urban farming, specifically with aeroponics systems, could be a possible solution in alleviating food insecurity in food deserts. In order to test and understand what type of system and products work best in such areas, this thesis looks at urban farming from farms' and consumers' perspective using qualitative and quantitative data. The qualitative data was collected from current businesses that are using urban farming techniques within the Phoenix valley. Based on the quantitative research, the consumers studied seemed willing to eat leafy greens and vegetables given that they are affordable, fresh, and they understand how to cook them. Further research could be a more focused study on residents of specific neighborhoods that are classified as food deserts. Another aspect that could be researched further is the other factors affecting the health of residents located in food deserts other than the availability of food. This could include, but is not limited to, lack of nutritional education, insufficient cooking materials, and personal food preferences.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Is Good the Enemy of the Perfect? Bundling Food Resources to Combat Food Insecurity

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As one of the root causes of chronic hunger, it is well-established that food insecurity adversely affects health and economic outcomes of those afflicted (Carmichael et al. 2007; Seligman et

As one of the root causes of chronic hunger, it is well-established that food insecurity adversely affects health and economic outcomes of those afflicted (Carmichael et al. 2007; Seligman et al. 2009; Huang, Matta Oshima, and Kim, 2010; Pan et al. 2012; Martinez et al. 2018). More than eleven percent of Americans, uncertain about where their next meal will come from, experienced some degree of food insecurity in 2018 (Coleman-Jensen, 2019). Programs like SNAP and WIC have not only proven to be effective in providing food for households, but they can serve as an example for other countries that struggle to help citizens meet their dietary needs (Gundersen, 2019). non-government entities like food banks and food pantries have played an increasingly important role in addressing food insecurity. While there is a perception that food banks and pantries are only emergency resources, evidence suggests that many individuals regularly rely on private hunger relief organizations for food (Paynter et al., 2011; Kicinski, 2012). Food banks play a crucially important role in distributing food and are uniquely positioned to alleviate hunger. However, these private organizations have been shown, compared to public food assistance programs, to be less effective at specifically addressing the issue of food insecurity (Bazerghi et al., 2016; Loopstra & Tarasuk, 2012; Ratcliffe & McKernan, 2010; Metallinos-Katsaras et al., 2010). Existing research has largely focused on the characteristics of food pantry clients generally, without exploring the socio-economic and experiential variation within this group (Towers, 2009; Kicinski, 2012; Gundersen el al., 2017). This study fills a gap in the literature by examining the characteristics of food pantry users, and how they compare to those not using food pantries but still face food insecurity, using nationally representative survey data. Additionally, I explore whether food pantries and public food assistance programs might be “bundled” together. I focus on gradients of economic vulnerability by examining households who participate in public food assistance programs, are SNAP-eligible but not participating, as well as households who bundle both private and public food assistance to meet their food needs. With this thesis, I hope to contribute this research by providing behavioral insights into understanding the role that food banks play in mitigating challenges associated with food insecurity among US households.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Impact and Consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Food Supply Chain and Food Insecurity

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My project focuses on the problems created by the COVID-19 pandemic that impacted the food supply chain in the United States and how they contributed to food insecurity. I identified

My project focuses on the problems created by the COVID-19 pandemic that impacted the food supply chain in the United States and how they contributed to food insecurity. I identified the three key problems, the shift in demand from the commercial to the retail market, the discarding of raw food and produce, and consumer panic buying. I used the analysis of these problems to then formulate a set of solutions that would work to solve these problems.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Food on the Brain: A Correlational Examination of Food Deserts and Mental Illness Prevalence in the United States

Description

Food insecurity is a major issue within the United States. Millions of households experience limited food availability, especially in regions deemed food deserts. Food deserts are geographical regions across the

Food insecurity is a major issue within the United States. Millions of households experience limited food availability, especially in regions deemed food deserts. Food deserts are geographical regions across the United States that possess limited access to grocery stores or supermarkets, and thus limited access to healthy food options. Individuals living in food deserts are at an increased risk of developing a mental illness, including depression, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Attentional Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Mental health is often associated with one’s environment or genetic susceptibility, and treatments are often focused on psychotherapeutic methods and prescription medication. In investigating food deserts and diets characteristic of food deserts, one can begin to make connections between food and mental health. Dietary patterns that exhibit greater concentrations of fats and sugars are associated with many of the symptoms of common mood disorders and are significant in producing biological indicators, like inflammation, which is identified in various neurodegenerative disorders. Brain foods like vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids among others, provide a unique lens into the ways the food and the brain interact, specifically through a concept termed the gut-brain axis. Research surrounding these connections, especially in a newer field called nutritional psychiatry, inform the ways in which researchers, scholars, and medical professionals understand mental health and food insecurity. These connections may also prompt future research in the field focused on food-based treatments and the use of food as a preventative form of medicine.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

Food Insecurity through the Lens of Sustainability: A Case Study of Phoenix, Arizona

Description

Food insecure populations suffer from the ability to access affordable and nutritious foods as a result of financial and transportation needs. Often these populations are concentrated in areas referenced as

Food insecure populations suffer from the ability to access affordable and nutritious foods as a result of financial and transportation needs. Often these populations are concentrated in areas referenced as food deserts. A food desert is an area that does not have a supermarket or large grocery store within a mile and often is saturated with small non-traditional food stores and fast- food establishments. In this study, 21 food deserts along Grand Avenue in Downtown Phoenix were analyzed to better understand their access to food, population statistics and barriers to being food secure. The research question analyzed is the impact food insecurity has on communities in Phoenix, Arizona. The findings are presented in the form of a research paper, as well as 15 black and white film photographs accompanied by descriptions. There is primary qualitative data presented through photographs and observations, as well as secondary quantitative data analyzed from Census data. The food deserts studied consist of communities that are low-income and majority minority with little to no access to nutritious food in their area. The economics of food insecurity and grocery stores, racial discrimination, access to transportation, impacts on health and education and the sustainability of food deserts are all aspects of food insecurity discussed in the research. Possible solutions such as community gardens and subsidized grocery stores are also presented. The study revealed that food insecurity has several negative impacts on the affected populations and communities and disproportionately impacts low-income and minority communities.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05