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Determining the effectiveness of the water conservation implementations within the City of Tempe's neighborhood grant program

Description

Two large sectors of water consumption within cities are: city owned irrigated landscape (such as parks) and household consumption. A related, third sector of consumption that has very little research behind it is shared landscapes in residential communities. Neighborhood communities,

Two large sectors of water consumption within cities are: city owned irrigated landscape (such as parks) and household consumption. A related, third sector of consumption that has very little research behind it is shared landscapes in residential communities. Neighborhood communities, including those with formal Homeowner’s Associations and informal Neighborhood Associations, have common landscapes they are responsible for up-keeping and irrigating. 208 neighborhood communities exist within the City of Tempe. Each year the city provides $30,000 in grant funding to these 208 neighborhoods to implement water conservation projects. This thesis focuses on ten neighborhoods who had applied and were granted funding to implement a conservation project between the years 2011 and 2016. My findings showed that this program has not been effective in reducing water consumption, wither due to the lack of implementation or the small-scale of the projects. From my research and synthesis, I suggest a layer of accountability be added to the program to ensure projects are effective and participants are implementing their projects and that the program is effective overall. This study provides the City of Tempe with relevant and viable information to aid management of water consumption and conservation within neighborhoods.

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2019-05

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Characterizing Diurnal Density and Temperature Variations in the Martian Atmosphere Using Data/Model Comparisons

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This project focuses on using Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) density data for carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen during deep dip campaigns 5, 6, and 8. Density profiles obtained from NGIMS were plotted against simulated density

This project focuses on using Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) density data for carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen during deep dip campaigns 5, 6, and 8. Density profiles obtained from NGIMS were plotted against simulated density profiles from the Mars Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (MGITM). Averaged temperature profiles were also plotted for the three deep dip campaigns, using NGIMS data and MGITM output. MGITM was also used as a tool to uncover potential heat balance terms needed to reproduce the mean density and temperature profiles measured by NGIMS.

This method of using NGIMS data as a validation tool for MGITM simulations has been tested previously using dayside data from deep dip campaigns 2 and 8. In those cases, MGITM was able to accurately reproduce the measured density and temperature profiles; however, in the deep dip 5 and 6 campaigns, the results are not quite the same, due to the highly variable nature of the nightside thermosphere. MGITM was able to fairly accurately reproduce the density and temperature profiles for deep dip 5, but the deep dip 6 model output showed unexpected significant variation. The deep dip 6 results reveal possible changes to be made to MGITM to more accurately reflect the observed structure of the nighttime thermosphere. In particular, upgrading the model to incorporate a suitable gravity wave parameterization should better capture the role of global winds in maintaining the nighttime thermospheric structure.

This project reveals that there still exist many unknowns about the structure and dynamics of the night side of the Martian atmosphere, as well as significant diurnal variations in density. Further study is needed to uncover these unknowns and their role in atmospheric mass loss.

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2019-05

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INVESTIGATING THE DISTRIBUTION OF FROSTS IN RELATION TO PRESENT-DAY GULLY ACTIVITY ON MARS

Description

A wide range of types of activity in mid-latitude Martian gullies has been observed over the last decade (Malin et al., 2006; Harrison et al., 2009, 2015; Diniega et al., 2010; Dundas et al., 2010, 2012, 2015, 2017) with some

A wide range of types of activity in mid-latitude Martian gullies has been observed over the last decade (Malin et al., 2006; Harrison et al., 2009, 2015; Diniega et al., 2010; Dundas et al., 2010, 2012, 2015, 2017) with some activity constrained temporally to occur in the coldest times of year (winter and spring; Harrison et al., 2009; Diniega et al., 2010; Dundas et al., 2010, 2012, 2015, 2017), suggesting that surficial frosts that form seasonally and diurnally might play a key role in this present-day activity. Frost formation is highly dependent on two key factors: (1) surface temperature and (2) the atmospheric partial pressure of the condensable gas (Kieffer, 1968). The Martian atmosphere is primarily composed of CO2and CO2 frost formation is not diffusion-limited (unlike H2O). Hence, for temperatures less than the local frost point of CO2, (~ 148 K at a surface pressure of 610 Pa) frost is always present (Piqueux et al., 2016). Typically, these frosts are dominated volumetrically by CO2, although small amounts of H2O frosts are also present, and typically precede CO2 frost deposition (due to water’s higher condensation temperature (Schorghofer and Edgett, 2006)). Here we use the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) onboard Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor, respectively, to explore the global spatial and temporal variation of temperatures conducive to CO2 and H2O frost formation on Mars, and assess their distribution with gully landforms. CO2 frost temperatures are observed at all latitudes and are strongly correlated with dusty, low thermal inertia regions near the equator. Modeling results suggest that frost formation is restricted to the surface due to near-surface radiative effects. About 49 % of all gullies lie within THEMIS frost framelets. In terms of active gullies, 54 % of active gullies lie within THEMIS framelets, with 14.3% in the north and 54% in the south.
Relatively small amounts of H2O frost (~ 10–100 μm) are also likely to form diurnally and seasonally. The global H2O frost point distribution follows water vapor column abundance closely, with a weak correlation with local surface pressure. There is a strong hemispherical dependence on the frost point temperature—with the northern hemisphere having a higher frost point (in general) than the southern hemisphere—likely due to elevation differences. Unlike the distribution of CO2 frost temperatures, there is little to no correlation with surface thermophysical properties (thermal inertia, albedo, etc.). Modeling suggests H2O frosts can briefly attain melting point temperatures for a few hours if present under thin layers of dust, and can perhaps play a role in present-day equatorial mass-wasting events (eg. McEwen et al., 2018).
Based on seasonal constraints on gully activity timing, preliminary field studies, frost presence from visible imagery, spectral data and thermal data (this work), it is likely that most present-day activity can be explained by frosts (primarily CO2, and possibly H2O). We predict that the conditions necessary for significant present-day activity include formation of sufficient amounts of frost (> ~20 cm/year) within loose, unconsolidated sediments (I < ~ 350) on available slopes. However, whether or not present-day gully activity is representative of gully formation as a whole is still open to debate, and the details on CO2 frost-induced gully formation mechanisms remain unresolved.

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2019-05

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Analyzing the Challenges and Solutions of Living on Mars

Description

This paper addresses many of the problems that will be encountered when travelling to Mars and discusses the possibility of different solutions. Protection from radiation, oxygen production, and water sources are some of the major problems and the solution to

This paper addresses many of the problems that will be encountered when travelling to Mars and discusses the possibility of different solutions. Protection from radiation, oxygen production, and water sources are some of the major problems and the solution to these problems are vital for the success of future space travel. By utilizing technology that has already been used in space travel and implementing the use of technology that is successful on Earth, humans will be able to live on Mars successfully.

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2020-05

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Understanding the Push for Development in Water Stressed Phoenix, Arizona

Description

Located in the Sunbelt of the Southwestern United States, Phoenix Arizona finds itself in one of the hottest, driest places in the world. Thankfully, Phoenix has the Salt River, Gila River, Verde River, and a vast aquifer to meet the

Located in the Sunbelt of the Southwestern United States, Phoenix Arizona finds itself in one of the hottest, driest places in the world. Thankfully, Phoenix has the Salt River, Gila River, Verde River, and a vast aquifer to meet the water demands of the municipal, industrial, and agricultural sectors. However, rampant groundwater pumping and over-allocation of these water supplies based on unprecedented, high flows of the Colorado River have created challenges for water managers to ensure adequate water supply for the future. Combined with the current 17-year drought and the warming and drying projections of climate change, the future of water availability in Phoenix will depend on the strength of water management laws, educating the public, developing a strong sense of community, and using development to manage population and support sustainability. As the prevalence of agriculture declines in and around Phoenix, a substantial amount of water is saved. Instead of storing this saved water, Phoenix is using it to support further development. Despite uncertainty regarding the abundant and continuous availability of Phoenix's water resources, development has hardly slowed and barely shifted directions to support sustainability. Phoenix was made to grow until it legally cannot expand anymore. In order to develop solutions, we must first understand the push for development in water-stressed Phoenix, Arizona.

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2017-05

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Photometric Color Correction of the Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS)

Description

The Star Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) will be a 6U CubeSat devoted to photometric monitoring of M dwarfs in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) and near-ultraviolet (NUV) (160 and 280 nm respectively), measuring the time-dependent spectral slope, intensity and evolution of

The Star Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) will be a 6U CubeSat devoted to photometric monitoring of M dwarfs in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) and near-ultraviolet (NUV) (160 and 280 nm respectively), measuring the time-dependent spectral slope, intensity and evolution of M dwarf stellar UV radiation. The delta-doped detectors baselined for SPARCS have demonstrated more than five times the in-band quantum efficiency of the detectors of GALEX. Given that red:UV photon emission from cool, low-mass stars can be million:one, UV observation of thes stars are susceptible to red light contamination. In addition to the high efficiency delta-doped detectors, SPARCS will include red-rejection filters to help minimize red leak. Even so, careful red-rejection and photometric calibration is needed. As was done for GALEX, white dwarfs are used for photometric calibration in the UV. We find that the use of white dwarfs to calibrate the observations of red stars leads to significant errors in the reported flux, due to the differences in white dwarf and red dwarf spectra. Here we discuss the planned SPARCS calibration model and the color correction, and demonstrate the importance of this correction when recording UV measurements of M stars taken by SPARCS.

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2021-05