Matching Items (3)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

Developing and Pilot Testing Digital Storytelling Interventions to Promote HPV Vaccinations among Vietnamese American Adolescents

Description

Significance Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, affecting 79 million Americans today and an additional 14 million Americans becoming infected with HPV each year. HPV infection may lead to the development of genital warts

Significance Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, affecting 79 million Americans today and an additional 14 million Americans becoming infected with HPV each year. HPV infection may lead to the development of genital warts and several types of cancers including both cervical and oropharyngeal cancers. The promotion of currently available HPV vaccines is important to prevent HPV transmission and reduce the prevalence of the comorbidities associated with infection. Promotion to Vietnamese-Americans in particular is important because of the increased rates of cervical cancers seen in this population. As Vietnamese-American mothers often act as the primary healthcare decision maker for their children, they were chosen as the target population for this intervention. Purpose: This study aims to (1) develop personal digital stories about HPV and HPV vaccination among Vietnamese women with adolescent children who are vaccinated against HPV; and (2) share these stories with a group of Vietnamese American mothers and assess the effect of the stories in changing the attitudes, beliefs, and intention to vaccinate for HPV. Methods: This study used a two-step process to design, implement, and evaluate digital stories to improve Vietnamese mothers' attitudes, beliefs, and intention to vaccinate their adolescent children against HPV. The first step was a formative research design to develop the digital stories. The second step was quasi-experimental with a pre and posttest design to evaluate the effect of the stories. Results: The first phase has produced two digital stories which will be screened recruitment has been completed for phase two. Content analysis showed the importance of community resources, the desire to protect children, a history of familial and/or personal cancer, concerns about side effects, and the influence of healthcare providers as themes in both stories. Recruitment efforts are underway to recruit eligible Vietnamese mothers to assess the effect of these stories. Data collection is ongoing. Conclusions and lessons learned: The project has yielded two digital stories and recruitment for phase two is underway. This project has been successful in obtaining IRB approval, recruiting phase one participants, holding a digital storytelling workshop, designing the phase two survey, and beginning data collection efforts. The phase two recruitment has been challenging and will necessitate a change in strategy to find participants.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

136975-Thumbnail Image.png

Display of Domain III from Dengue 2 Envelope Protein on HBsAg Virus-like Particles Vectored by Measles Virus

Description

Dengue virus infects millions of people every year. Yet there is still no vaccine available to prevent it. Here we use a neutralizing epitope determinant on the dengue envelope (E) protein as an immunogen to be vectored by a measles

Dengue virus infects millions of people every year. Yet there is still no vaccine available to prevent it. Here we use a neutralizing epitope determinant on the dengue envelope (E) protein as an immunogen to be vectored by a measles virus (MV) vaccine. However the domain III (DIII) of the dengue 2 E protein is too small to be immunogenic by itself. In order for it to be displayed on a larger particle, it was inserted into the amino terminus of small hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, S) coding sequence. To generate the recombinant MV vector and verify the efficiency of this concept, a reverse genetics system was used where the MV vectors express one or two additional transcription units to direct the assembly of hybrid HBsAg particles. Two types of recombinant measles virus were produced: pB(+)MVvac2(DIII-S,S)P and pB(+)MVvac2(DIII-S)N. Virus recovered from pB(+)MVvac2(DIII-S,S)P was viable. An ELISA assay was performed to demonstrate the expression and secretion of HBsAg. Supernatant from MVvac2(DIII-S,S)P infected cells confirmed that hybrid HBsAg-domain III particles with a density similar to traditional HBsAg particles were released. Characteristics of the subviral particle have been analyzed for the successful incorporation of domain III. The replication fitness of the recombinant MV was evaluated using multi-step growth kinetics and showed reduced replication fitness when compared to the parental strain MVvac2. This demonstrates that viral replication is hindered by the addition of the two inserts into MV genome. Further analysis of MVvac2(DIII-S)N is needed to justify immune response studies in a small animal model using both of the generated recombinant vectors.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2014-05

162161-Thumbnail Image.png

Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy in the Prenatal Population

Description

False accusations concerning the development of autism and other hazardous side effects have triggered parental vaccine hesitancy, leading to outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. This opposition to vaccination risks the health of both individuals and entire communities. The purpose of this

False accusations concerning the development of autism and other hazardous side effects have triggered parental vaccine hesitancy, leading to outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. This opposition to vaccination risks the health of both individuals and entire communities. The purpose of this project was to determine the effectiveness of prenatal education on maternal vaccine hesitancy and infant immunization rates. In a pretest posttest design, pregnant mothers greater than or equal to 30 weeks gestation were recruited by The Arizona Partnership for Immunization (TAPI) and virtually educated about infant immunization. A voice-over PowerPoint presentation was delivered to the participants virtually and focused on vaccine knowledge, intention to vaccinate, and vaccine hesitancy. These outcomes were evaluated virtually pre- and post-intervention with the Parent Attitudes about Childhood Vaccines (PACV) survey (⍺ = 0.84), and the infants’ vaccination records were compared against the recommended immunization schedule at two months of age. Using the Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks test, data analysis revealed vaccine hesitancy was significantly reduced between pre- and post-intervention (Z = 27.70, p = .000), and 100% of the 2-month-old infants were fully immunized with the recommended vaccines. The effect size (d = 12.807) also indicated a strong relationship between pre- and post-intervention vaccine hesitancy. Vaccine hesitancy remains a threat to public health. With prenatal education, pregnant mothers will likely become more knowledgeable of vaccine benefits and better prepared to make informed decisions. Confident vaccination will decrease vaccine hesitancy and improve immunization rates, while promoting individual and societal health.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-27