Matching Items (14)

Six Years From Now

Description

Six Years From Now is a verbatim theatre piece all about mental health. This creative project involved interviewing twelve different people about mental health and residential treatment centers, and then

Six Years From Now is a verbatim theatre piece all about mental health. This creative project involved interviewing twelve different people about mental health and residential treatment centers, and then creating a play consisting of a series of monologues created from the exact words spoken in the interviews. The goal of writing this play was to help tell other people's stories, educate others about what living with mental illness is really like, educate others on modern residential treatment centers, and reduce the stigma around mental health and mental illness.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Pandora: A Play by Abbey Toye

Description

Pandora is a play exploring our relationship with gendered technology through the lens of artificial intelligence. Can women be subjective under patriarchy? Do robots who look like women have subjectivity?

Pandora is a play exploring our relationship with gendered technology through the lens of artificial intelligence. Can women be subjective under patriarchy? Do robots who look like women have subjectivity? Hoping to create a better version of ourselves, The Engineer must navigate the loss of her creation, and Pandora must navigate their new world. The original premiere run was March 27-28, 2018, original cast: Caitlin Andelora, Rikki Tremblay, and Michael Tristano Jr.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Reveal

Description

Reveal follows the story of high school student Jason as he navigates the hardships of high school and the personal hardships of sexual identity. The thesis was created through research

Reveal follows the story of high school student Jason as he navigates the hardships of high school and the personal hardships of sexual identity. The thesis was created through research of other LGBTQ performers and interviews conducted on campus. It includes a one-act script followed by a list of the sources that I used to further my writing experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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When Learning to Play Becomes Playing to Learn

Description

Exploratory Play is a universal experience that occurs throughout different kinds of childhoods. This study investigates how children’s vocabulary and exploratory play are influenced by how the caregiver responds to

Exploratory Play is a universal experience that occurs throughout different kinds of childhoods. This study investigates how children’s vocabulary and exploratory play are influenced by how the caregiver responds to the child’s communicative bids. We hypothesize that if caregivers use more open-ended questions in response to their child’s communicative bids, children will show higher rates of exploration during free play.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

If a Robot Makes Demands in the Rain Forest, Does it Sound Like This? Sound Designing Heddatron, a Play By Elizabeth Meriwether

Description

The aim of this project was to create an original sound design and score for the ASU SOMDT production of HEDDATRON, by Elizabeth Meriwether. Composition and sound design was done

The aim of this project was to create an original sound design and score for the ASU SOMDT production of HEDDATRON, by Elizabeth Meriwether. Composition and sound design was done primarily with a modular synthesizer. All audio editing was done in Reaper, and the cues were programmed in Qlab.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

Did He Kill the Mockingbird?

Description

Did He Kill the Mockingbird? is a play I wrote, which explores the effects of being on the Autism Spectrum plays in Arthur Radley’s life. Arthur Radley is a very

Did He Kill the Mockingbird? is a play I wrote, which explores the effects of being on the Autism Spectrum plays in Arthur Radley’s life. Arthur Radley is a very misunderstood member of Maycomb County, who is constantly seen as a lesser member of society in Maycomb County.

Did He Kill the Mockingbird? provides an alternate ending to To Kill a Mockingbird. In the original play, the townspeople never discovered that Arthur Radley killed Bob Ewell. In Did He Kill the Mockingbird? a townsperson overhears Atticus Finch and Heck Tate discussing Bob Ewell's death. This leads the townsperson to tell others in Maycomb County of the events that had unfolded the night Bob Ewell died.
As the play progresses, we explore how ignorance, willful and not, change the daily lives and actions of individuals who have mental illnesses and disabilities such as Autism. The townspeople may not see a problem with the way they treat Arthur Radley, as he is just a man who they believe stabbed his mother. However, in reality, they are causing more harm by encouraging and perpetuating rumors about Arthur Radley. In turn, the rumors enhance the stigma that plagues Arthur Radley.
Jean Louise Finch is the main character in Did he Kill the Mockingbird? Jean supports Arthur Radley, and is able to see the good in him although the rest of the townspeople continue to believe he is a bad person.

I hope that my version of this alternative ending to original play brings to light the changes that we need to make as a society to encourage the acceptance of all people. As a society, we need to treat all people, whether disabled or not, as equals. Rather than perpetuating stereotypes, we need to encourage everyone to work hard and reach for their goals whatever they may be.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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I will tell you about playing with my brother [untitled]: perceptions of social interaction from the voice of child who has a sibling identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Description

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is experienced in a variety of ways within families particularly among siblings with and without ASD. The effects of ASD on sibling relationships are integral to

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is experienced in a variety of ways within families particularly among siblings with and without ASD. The effects of ASD on sibling relationships are integral to family life. While some studies have examined sibling relationships, research regarding sibling roles exhibited during play activities and social interactions is lacking. Further, siblings' voices are rarely revealed in research on play. In response to a need for greater understanding of the role of play among siblings impacted by ASD, this dissertation used a cultural historical activity theory lens to understand how play and social interactions evolved among siblings since childhood development is informed by access to and participation in play. Siblings may be considered actors with unique cultural histories as they create and re-create their own identities through play. In this study, an emphasis was placed on the complex processes siblings experience while locating their own niche with their families. The study focused on the use of a variety of tools, division of labor, the rules families utilized to interact and how these rules were disturbed. As a result, the study offers a more complete understanding of how play and social interactions affect the ways ASD impact siblings, families, and community members. This study provides holistic views of the development and impact of sibling play on identity development and relationships.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Guiding play: preschool teachers' facilitation of gender-typed and gender neutral activities with boys, girls, and mixed-sex groups

Description

Preschool teachers have the opportunity to facilitate children's play with a variety of classroom activities. Preschool activities can be categorized as masculine, feminine, and gender-neutral based on children's preferences. Understanding

Preschool teachers have the opportunity to facilitate children's play with a variety of classroom activities. Preschool activities can be categorized as masculine, feminine, and gender-neutral based on children's preferences. Understanding how and why teachers facilitate children's play with feminine, masculine, and gender-neutral activities is important because children's engagement in gender typed activities has been linked to cognitive development. The current study extends previous and outdated research on teachers' engagement in gender-typed classroom activities by using a teacher-focal observational coding system and survey data to assess the frequency at which, with whom, and why teachers facilitate feminine, masculine, and gender-neutral activities. Results reveal teachers facilitate gender-neutral and masculine activities more frequently than feminine activities. However, facilitation of these activities is qualified by with whom the teacher interacts and the classroom context. During free play, teachers facilitate gender-typed activities in stereotypic ways, facilitating masculine activities with boys more than with girls and feminine activities with girls more than with boys. Although, during structured settings, teachers do not facilitate masculine and feminine activities at different frequencies. Finally, in both free play and structured settings, teachers' gender attitudes do not seem to be strong predictors of their facilitation of gender-typed and gender-neutral activities with the exception of teachers' facilitation of feminine activities during structured settings. The present findings address important issues in educational and developmental research by investigating teachers' gendered classroom practices.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Young children's digital game culture in everyday life: an ethnographic case study

Description

This dissertation examines how young children engage with digital games at home and how parents think and talk about their children's digital gaming. This is an ethnographic case study of

This dissertation examines how young children engage with digital games at home and how parents think and talk about their children's digital gaming. This is an ethnographic case study of the digital game playing of six three-year-old children in six families. This study combines ethnographic methods and critical perspectives to construct analyses that have the potential to rethink young children's digital game play. The focus of this study is on understanding how digital gaming functions in children's everyday lives. This study shows that young children's digital game play takes place in the interstices of their everyday family life. Digital games do not entirely change or displace other practices in early childhood, but they are integrated into existing young children's everyday practices in their family life. Digital games as a source of young children's imagination enrich young children's play rather than substitute for young children's spontaneous non-digital play. Young children and their parents tactically use young children's mobile game play to cope with their modern life. Negotiating over game selections, time, and space between young children and their parents is an everyday practice of families and digital games are a site not only for family power struggles but also of shared activity. Digital games reflect the dominant culture in which they are produced. However, this study shows that young children do not passively receive the messages in the games but rather make sense of the game contents according to their everyday local experiences. Digital games are now a part of everyday practices for both adults and young children, and young children's digital game play reflects contemporary society.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Free play: through the eyes of a child and early childhood professional

Description

Via my personal, academic and professional journey, I closely examine my career growth and how my perspectives on early childhood environments developed in reference to free play. Using a narrative

Via my personal, academic and professional journey, I closely examine my career growth and how my perspectives on early childhood environments developed in reference to free play. Using a narrative format, I share personal experiences that have shaped my views on free play. Free play is a type of play that features choices, freedom of selection, cognitive and social development, and child interest. I review relevant literature and weave in my personal and professional experiences in order to reflect on free play from two different perspectives: participant (child), and the Early Childhood Professional (teacher and/or administrator). I also demonstrate how my professional and academic milestones have contributed to my developing beliefs and ideas put into practice about free play in early childhood environments.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011