Matching Items (6)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

132489-Thumbnail Image.png

The Effects of Nature and Culture on Millennial Response to Food Advertisements

Description

The purpose of advertising is nearly always to persuade the viewer. Ads persuade us to buy products, to stop using products, to visit places, to vote for candidates, and more. When it comes to food marketing, advertisements often use appeals

The purpose of advertising is nearly always to persuade the viewer. Ads persuade us to buy products, to stop using products, to visit places, to vote for candidates, and more. When it comes to food marketing, advertisements often use appeals that have nothing to do with the taste or nutritional value of the food its selling. They may use scantily clad models, famous celebrities, striking images, and funny quotes. However, the same advertisement does not appeal across all demographics. Culture and society play a role in the way we perceive the ads presented to us. Amongst millennials (the generation born between 1985-2000), changes in social norms and ideologies have particularly influenced the content this generation prefers to see, even across different ethnic groups. The digital age has changed the world that millennials have reached adulthood in, and social media and globalization have made us more connected than ever. By studying the kinds of food advertisements that entice millennials and turn them away, we can find trends that are popular across all cultures in this age division as well as the appeals that may alienate certain groups.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2019-05

131255-Thumbnail Image.png

Living in Color: An Analysis of Feelings and Color in Relation to Marketing

Description

Companies can spend anywhere from hundreds to millions of dollars in creating as well as redesigning their logos and brand images. To make sure that they are creating their logos in an effective way, it is important to look at

Companies can spend anywhere from hundreds to millions of dollars in creating as well as redesigning their logos and brand images. To make sure that they are creating their logos in an effective way, it is important to look at how consumers will be affected by the choices that are made with the design.
The purpose of this paper is to examine how colors and orientations of logos affect consumer’s brand perception. This was done by distributing a survey that asked for participant’s feelings toward a certain subject. The survey first asked for the participant to define certain terms. Then, it asked what emotions the participants felt when thinking about certain colors. Finally, it asked users their opinions of logos after specific changes had been made. These changes include changing the colors of the original logos and changing the orientation of the original logos.
This paper will provide a look into over 600 participants' minds and how they perceive color. These participants were Arizona State University marketing students enrolled in Dr. John Eaton’s course during the 2020 Spring semester. This paper will provide recommendations to those looking to rebrand or create a brand logo.
After looking at the results of the survey and some outside research, it was hard to determine exactly what emotions consumers would feel with each color. Even though there was a large sample size, there were a lot of limitations in the survey which caused complications with the results. Due to these limitations, it made the correlation between specific colors and an emotion inconclusive.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

134417-Thumbnail Image.png

Where is the Line? Advertising's Invasion of our Lives

Description

The advertising industry has an interesting relationship with society. Most consumers do not want to be advertised to but the advertisers need to be catching the attention of future customers, as to allow businesses to grow and develop. However, as

The advertising industry has an interesting relationship with society. Most consumers do not want to be advertised to but the advertisers need to be catching the attention of future customers, as to allow businesses to grow and develop. However, as advertising practices have continued to pester the public with increasingly invasive ads, it is important to discuss how far advertisers should go in invading the lives of the consumer. Advertising is necessary in today's world, as without it many industries that are used daily by consumers would become far less profitable without it, rendering many services and entertainment outlets unable to serve their customers. While necessary, advertising has become nothing more than an annoyance to a lot of consumers, leading to the ultimate question addressed in this thesis: where is the line? In addition to discussing many real-world examples, measuring the extent of the annoyance behind a series of controlled advertisements would become crucial in exhibiting how invasive ads can really be. This lead to the survey which aimed to discover where the line is that advertisers should not cross when continuing to create interesting ads, as they can become a nuisance to the audience they are trying to appeal to. While it is difficult to measure exactly when an advertisement becomes a detractor instead of effective marketing, it is determined that advertisers must truly embrace the audience as well as the medium they use to send their messages. Survey responses led to the conclusion that the advertising industry must be wary of what their audience is attempting to do when companies advertise to them. Advertisers must strive to not become an annoyance to the audience they are marketing to, and must create a cohesive campaign that complements the medium used as to not jeopardize the integrity of the entertainment medium.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

147826-Thumbnail Image.png

The Elimination of Olympic Nonrevenue Sports: Unforeseen Consequences

Description

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness about the problem nonrevenue sports face today by analyzing the key factors of the failing Division 1 model and providing some unforeseen consequences in the elimination of nonrevenue sports. The first

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness about the problem nonrevenue sports face today by analyzing the key factors of the failing Division 1 model and providing some unforeseen consequences in the elimination of nonrevenue sports. The first section will explore the elimination and financial trends of NCAA Division 1 in a historical and contemporary context. The second section will provide the deep-rooted problems associated with collegiate sports. Lastly, the third section will analyze unforeseen consequences for athletic departments that should be accounted for when contemplating the elimination of a nonrevenue program.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

132811-Thumbnail Image.png

Meme-Marketing: How Modern Corporations Enhance Customer Engagement

Description

With the millennial and Gen Z generations being comprised of avid social media users, corporations have turned to online platforms, such as Twitter and Instagram, as a way of communicating and connecting to their audiences. One method that corporations are

With the millennial and Gen Z generations being comprised of avid social media users, corporations have turned to online platforms, such as Twitter and Instagram, as a way of communicating and connecting to their audiences. One method that corporations are using to attract consumers is utilizing internet memes. Brands and corporations are now marketing through internet memes to enhance and define the brand’s personality and voice. This study examines the ways corporations use internet memes to personify their brand image and the overall effectiveness of meme usage in engaging consumers. Based on an exploratory analysis of brands over several media pages, we find evidence that brands with an edgy or humorous personality have increased engagement when using this method of communication, while more luxury brands should avoid using memes. Our research was conducted by examining and analyzing the social media accounts of four companies that use memes regularly as ways to promote their brands between November 1, 2018 and February 1, 2019. Our findings suggest that there is no definite correlation between internet memes and consumer engagement, rather that they are beneficial to use in addition to traditional marketing. In order to gain a stronger understanding of the relationships between internet memes and engagement, future research can study online brand personalities more in-depth and develop theories on the effectiveness of meme usage.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2019-05

147592-Thumbnail Image.png

You Play Ball Like a Girl: Debunking the Myth That Sportswomen Are Not Marketable

Description

What if I told you that a few photos of a sweatshirt, delivered at the perfect time, cracked a case that had stumped some of the world’s greatest marketing minds for more than twenty years? What if I told you

What if I told you that a few photos of a sweatshirt, delivered at the perfect time, cracked a case that had stumped some of the world’s greatest marketing minds for more than twenty years? What if I told you that a dismissed lawsuit played an integral part in this? One made possible by a rainy night in Couva, Trinidad? Or that all of this, hundreds of years in the making, could aid a wrongfully incarcerated man in being freed after spending twenty two years in prison, and pioneer one of the largest-scale social justice movements of the 21st century? All catalyzed by the effects of a global pandemic? If I told you, would you believe me? But let’s get back to that sweatshirt for now.<br/>In January 2020, the Coronavirus was a seemingly distant issue for another part of the world to most Americans. A generation that had seen the likes of H1N1 and Ebola come, cause irrational panic, and subsequently disappear had grown complacent with regard to unknown diseases. On March 9th, Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert took a defiant step in dispelling fears of COVID-19 by touching every microphone in the room at the end of an interview. Two days later, a test revealed that he had contracted the virus, the first professional athlete to do so. The NBA suspended all activities, and thus began the succession of sports leagues across the nation suspending their seasons as global infection numbers rose. But we humans are resilient. As weeks became months, the NBA and WNBA were able to engineer “bubbles” to play in: isolated areas with only the players and essential personnel to play the games, equipped with safety precautions and persistent testing. With no fans allowed inside, social media and media members provided the only glimpse into the “bubble” that ordairy fans would get.<br/>The mornings of July 25th and 26th, as the players arrived for the first games of the day and were snapped by photographers, many sported orange hoodies with the trademark white WNBA logo in the center, to promote the start of the WNBA’s “bubble” season that summer. This sent the internet into a frenzy. “#OrangeHoodie” was trending across all social media platforms, the item sold out on many websites, and more people than ever were talking about the WNBA online. That season, WNBA viewership spiked. More people watched the WNBA than ever before, even with the NBA’s playoffs taking place at the same time. How, then, did a single orange hoodie change the future of marketing the WNBA? What does that tell us about other women’s sports that have similarly struggled with attention and viewership? What role does media exposure play in all of this; do we perceive women differently in the media than we do men? Are these issues rooted in deeper societal prejudices, or are women’s sports simply quantifiably less entertaining?<br/>On a journey to find the answers to these questions, I learned a lot about the relationship of media and culture, about sport, and about the outstanding untold stories of American sportswomen. However, the most important thing I found was that women are marketable. After long being denied the opportunities and exposure they deserve, American culture has as a result pushed women to the background under the guise of them not being demanded or marketable. This could not be further from the truth. They are not demanded because they are not seen. Investing in sportswomen would not only create a better future for all women, but for all people. How, then, is this achievable? How will the powers that be allow for changes to be made? How can we as individuals be receptive to this change? In this thesis, I will take you on a journey where media is fun and fair, and where the future is female.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05