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A feasibility study on the effectiveness of an 8-Week meditative movement intervention to initiate weight loss in female gastric bypass patients experiencing post-surgical weight gain

Description

While obesity rates have plateaued within the last decade,

two-thirds of the United States

population is currently classified as overweight (defined a

s a body mass index [BMI] of

25-29.9 kg/m²) or obese (a BMI greater than 30 kg/m²). Bariatric

surgical

While obesity rates have plateaued within the last decade,

two-thirds of the United States

population is currently classified as overweight (defined a

s a body mass index [BMI] of

25-29.9 kg/m²) or obese (a BMI greater than 30 kg/m²). Bariatric

surgical interventions

are not only more effective than behavioral treatments

in the short term but are the only

form of obesity intervention with evidence of consisten

t long-term effectiveness.

However, even among bariatric surgery patients, weight

loss often stabilizes and it is

estimated that more than 20% of bariatric surgery patient

s will regain a significant

amount of weight that was initially lost long-term. Li

ttle research to date has been

conducted on physical activity in post bariatric surgery pati

ents. More specifically, there

have been no studies to date examining the effects of Me

ditative Movement (MM)

programs on body composition in bariatric patients. A s

tudy using an 8-week Tai Chi

Easy program was conducted in female gastric bypass patient

s to explore feasibility of

MM in the bariatric population as well as pre- and post-in

tervention changes in weight,

mindfulness, eating behaviors, body awareness, physical a

ctivity patterns, dietary quality

and mood. Data analysis revealed that there were no s

ignificant changes in weight or

physical activity patterns; however, significant changes w

ere observed in anxiety, overall

body awareness and cognitive restraint in eating. Addit

ionally, a significant decrease in

processed meat consumption and a weak trend towards increa

sed consumption of fruits

may suggest an overall improvement in dietary quality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014

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Pokémon GO: a socio-technical exploratory

Description

PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify whether increased Pokémon GO use resulted in increased daily steps, compared to days when an individual did not play. In addition, this study examined Pokémon GO as a use case for for the study

PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify whether increased Pokémon GO use resulted in increased daily steps, compared to days when an individual did not play. In addition, this study examined Pokémon GO as a use case for for the study of gamification, particularly whether traditionally identified game mechanics in gamification literature were successfully identified as elements players enjoy when playing Pokémon GO. METHODS: A mixed methods approach, with 17 participants taking part in a daily physical activity tracking study and 14 participants participating in semi-structured interviews. In the use study, participant steps were tracked for one week using the Apple Health Kit application, and participants were also asked to provide daily answers to a variety of questions assessing game preferences and daily use of Pokémon GO - using the application called PACO. The semi-structured interviews examined self-reported physical activity, and asked questions pertaining to use of Pokémon GO, such as motivation to play. RESULTS: Results assessed by t-test indicate a small but non-significant trend towards increased steps taken on days when a participant played vs. did not play (t(72)=- .56, p=.57, mplay=5,0153220, mnonplay=4,5152,959). This was confirmed with a mixed model test showing that when controlling for time and participant’s baseline level of steps, there was no significant effect on steps/day. Results from the daily surveys and also the semi-structured interviews, indicated that nostalgia (i.e., catching ones’ favorite childhood Pokémon), was a strong motivator for many to play the game, which was counter to theoretical expectations. In line with previous theory, results suggested that operant conditioning principles appeared to be at work in terms of fostering game play use. DISCUSSION: Results of this study, which was a primarily hypothesis generating endeavor, indicated possible trends toward increased steps on days when a person plays Pokémon G), but - with such a small sample, and short-term length of study - no firm conclusions can be drawn. Further, results indicate the particular value of nostalgia as a driver towards game play for Pokémon GO.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016

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Walkability Around the Worksite and Physical Activity

Description

Features of the built environment (BE) are related to a wide range of health factors, including leisure-time physical activity (PA) and active forms of transportation. For working adults, worksite neighborhood is likely an important BE to better understand the impact

Features of the built environment (BE) are related to a wide range of health factors, including leisure-time physical activity (PA) and active forms of transportation. For working adults, worksite neighborhood is likely an important BE to better understand the impact of various factors on PA patterns. Compared to home neighborhood walkability research, worksite walkability has received relatively less attention. The objective of this project was to identify if worksite walkability was significantly associated with PA behavior.

Aims: to evaluate 1) the PA variation explained by work walkability, 2) the moderating effects of person-level characteristics to the relationship between PA and work walkability, and 3) the differences in the rate of change in PA over time by worksite walkability.

Methods: self-report and accelerometer measured PA at baseline (aim 1, 2); longitudinal accelerometer PA during the initial 56 days of a behavioral intervention (aim 3). Adults were generally healthy and reported part- or full-time employment with a geocodeable address outside the home. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) measured walkability followed established techniques (i.e., residential, intersection, and transit densities, and land-use-mix).

Results: On average, worksite walkability did not show direct relationships with PA (aim 1); yet certain person-level characteristics moderated the relationships: sex, race, and not having young children in the household (aim 2). During 56 days of intervention, the PA rate of change over time showed no evidence of a moderating effect by worksite walkability.

Discussion: Worksite walkability was generally not shown to relate to the overall PA. However, specific subgroups (women, those without young children) appeared more responsive to their worksite neighborhood walkability. Prior literature shows certain demographics respond differently with various BE exposures, and this study adds a potentially novel moderator of interest regarding young children at home. Understanding who benefits from access to walkable BE may inform targeted interventions and policy to improve PA levels and foster health equity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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The relationship between clinical experience, emotional intelligence and counselor self-efficacy with resilience as a moderator

Description

Emotions are essential ingredients to the human experience. How one feels influences how one thinks and behaves. The processing capacity for emotion-related information can be thought of as emotional intelligence (Salovey & Mayer, 1997). Regulating emotions and coping

Emotions are essential ingredients to the human experience. How one feels influences how one thinks and behaves. The processing capacity for emotion-related information can be thought of as emotional intelligence (Salovey & Mayer, 1997). Regulating emotions and coping with emotional experiences are among the most common reasons individuals seek counseling. Counselors must be uniquely equipped in processing and managing emotional content. Counselor’s skills and abilities related to emotional intelligence are vital to effective counseling. There is indication that confidence in one’s counseling skills may be equally as important as competence in these skills. Counselor self-efficacy, one’s belief in one’s ability to perform counseling activities, has been shown to relate to counselor performance and ability and increased clinical experience has been associated with higher levels of counselor self-efficacy (Larson & Daniels, 1998). One’s emotion-related information processing abilities and one’s clinical experiences may contribute to one’s perception of one’s competencies and abilities as a counselor.

However, this relationship may not be a simple cause-and-effect association. Individuals may possess a certain aptitude (emotional intelligence) and not perceive themselves as competent as counselors. Resilience, one’s ability to “bounce-back” and persevere through adversity may moderate the relation between emotional intelligence and counselor self-efficacy (Wagnild, 1990).

The current study explored the relations among clinical experience, emotional intelligence and resilience in predicting self-efficacy. In addition, whether resilience would moderate the relationship between emotional intelligence and counselor self-efficacy was examined. Eighty counselor trainees enrolled in CACREP-accredited master’s programs participated in this study online. They completed a demographics form, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT; Mayer, et al., 2002), the Counselor Activities Self-Efficacy Scales (CASES; Lent et al., 2003), and The Resilience Scale (RS; Wagnild & Young, 1993). Multiple hierarchical regressions revealed clinical experience (specifically a completed practicum), emotional intelligence, and resilience predicted counselor self-efficacy. The moderation was not significant. These findings support the value of the exploration of clinical experience, emotional intelligence and resilience in developing counselor self-efficacy. A more comprehensive discussion of the findings, limitations, and implications of the current study as well as suggested direction for future research are discussed herein.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017