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Effect of Powder Reuse on DMLS (Direct Metal Laser Sintering) Product Integrity: Why Honeywell Believes the Future is Additive Manufacturing

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Honeywell is currently extending the reach of additive manufacturing (AM) in its product line and expects to produce as much as 40% of its inventory through AM in five years.

Honeywell is currently extending the reach of additive manufacturing (AM) in its product line and expects to produce as much as 40% of its inventory through AM in five years. Additive manufacturing itself is expected to grow into a $3.1 billion dollar industry in the next 5 to 10 years. Reusing IN 718 powder, a nickel-based super alloy metal powder, is an ideal option to reduce costs as well as reduce waste because it can be used with additive manufacturing, but the main obstacles are lack of procedure standardization and product quality assurances from this process. The goal of the capstone project, "Effect of Powder Reuse on DMLS (Direct Metal Laser Sintering) Product Integrity," is to create a powder characterization protocol in order to determine if the IN 718 powder can be reused and what effect the IN 718 reused powder has on the mechanical properties of the products Honeywell fabricates. To provide context and impact of this capstone project, this paper serves to identify the benefits of AM for Honeywell and the cost effectiveness of reusing the powder versus using virgin powder every time. It was found that Honeywell's investment in AM is due to the cost effectiveness of AM, versatility in product design, and to ensure Honeywell remains competitive in the future. In terms of reducing expenses, reusing powder enables costs to be approximately 45% less than using virgin powder. With these key pieces of information, the motivations for this capstone project are understood to a fuller and more profound degree.

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  • 2016-05

The Impact of Implementing an Invariant-Based Theory of Composites on the Automotive Industry

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A novel approach, the Invariant Based Theory of Composites and the "Trace" method it proposes, has the potential to reduce aerospace composite development times and costs by over 30% thus

A novel approach, the Invariant Based Theory of Composites and the "Trace" method it proposes, has the potential to reduce aerospace composite development times and costs by over 30% thus reinvigorating the development process and encouraging composite technology growth. The "trace" method takes advantage of inherent stiffness properties of laminates, specifically carbon fiber, to make predictions of material properties used to derive design allowables. The advantages of the "trace" theory may not necessarily be specific to the aerospace industry, however many automotive manufacturers are facing environmental, social and political pressure to increase the gas mileage in their vehicles and reduce their carbon footprint. Therefore, the use of lighter materials, such as carbon fiber composites, to replace heavier metals in cars is inevitable yet as of now few auto manufacturers implement composites in their cars. The high material, testing and development costs, much like the aerospace industry, have been prohibitive to widespread use of these materials but progress is being made in overcoming those challenges. The "trace" method, while initially intended for quasi-isotropic, aerospace grade carbon-fiber laminates, still yields reasonable, and correctable, results for types of laminates as well such as with woven fabrics and thermoplastic matrices, much of which are being used in these early stages of automotive composite development. Despite the varying use of materials, the "trace" method could potentially boost automotive composites in a similar way to the aerospace industry by reducing testing time and costs and perhaps even playing a role in establishing emerging simulations of these materials.

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  • 2016-05