Matching Items (8)

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The Effect of the Solera Experience on First-Year Student Sense of Belonging at Arizona State University's West Campus

Description

A student’s sense of belonging at a higher education institution can have a profound impact on their ability to persist through college and complete a degree program. First-year students enrolled

A student’s sense of belonging at a higher education institution can have a profound impact on their ability to persist through college and complete a degree program. First-year students enrolled in NEW 101 classes at Arizona State University’s (ASU’S) West campus were evaluated to determine if the Solera Experience, a program designed to help first-year students integrate into the ASU community, had an impact on first-year students’ sense of belonging at ASU. Although the Solera Experience was not found to have a large impact on students’ sense of belonging, it is worth noting that a majority of the first-year students felt like they belong at ASU. Additionally, a student’s short-term and long-term belief in their own academic success did influence their perception of belonging at ASU, which suggests, overall, that the programs ASU has in place to establish sense of belonging seem to be effective.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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A Preliminary Inquiry into Latina/o Students' ""Sense of Belonging"" at Arizona State University's West Campus

Description

The purpose of this research is to explore Latina/o students' involvement at Arizona State University West and how it affects their sense of belonging, and thereby, their retention. I operationalize

The purpose of this research is to explore Latina/o students' involvement at Arizona State University West and how it affects their sense of belonging, and thereby, their retention. I operationalize a "sense of belonging" as being able to express and feel comfortable with one's ethnic identity in the context of a higher education institution (Hurtado, 1997). I operationalize student involvement by the extent to which an individual student is devoted to their academic experience, invests time studying on campus, participates in student organizations, and interacts with faculty and their peers (Astin, 1984). I draw from Astin's theory of student involvement and Hurtado's sense of belonging as a base for this inquiry because they are critical components to understanding retention among the Latino/a community at Arizona State University West.

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Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Science Performance, Science Competence, and Science Identity Recognition in Engineering

Description

This is a study that demonstrates my growing understanding of the factors that influence Latinx engineering students’ sense of belonging in engineering. I conducted a literature review to help me

This is a study that demonstrates my growing understanding of the factors that influence Latinx engineering students’ sense of belonging in engineering. I conducted a literature review to help me gain perspectives from prior research on this topic. I wanted to investigate Latinx engineering students’ sense of belonging at Arizona State University. This interest was fueled by my own perspectives as an undergraduate first-generation Latina student. I was inspired by the Social Identity Development Theory described in “Becoming La Ingenieria” by Sarah L Rodriguez (2019). I found that science performance, science competence, and science identity recognition were important factors in engineering for Latinx students to thrive and succeed in their chosen major--engineering. Through the literature review, I found that Latinx engineering students need family support, faculty and staff to look up to, and ways to create authentic connections with near peers and professions. Student organization involvement such as in the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers student chapter can help Latinx students grow their intersectional identities related to their identification as Latinx and as an engineer which then helped strengthen their sense of belonging in engineering. <br/><br/>I conducted a survey of Latinx engineering students at Arizona State University to better understand their perceptions on issues related to their sense of belonging and underlying factors of competence, recognition, and performance in engineering. However, due to the low participation, possibly due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, I could not conduct statistical analyses that could lead inferences to the broad population of Latinx engineering students at ASU. <br/><br/>It is important to continue to create structures within university engineering programs and professional engineering societies to offer formal near-peer and professional mentorship of Latinx students. The integration of families from recruitment to graduation of Latinx engineering students may help build a more supportive structure for students to succeed. Research on the ways in which university faculty, staff, and near-peers can better support Latinx students will be essential to build classroom environments that help all students build a sense of belonging in engineering.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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A Measure of Engineering Self-Efficacy & Engineering Identity in Undergraduate Students

Description

Self-efficacy in engineering, engineering identity, and coping in engineering have been shown in previous studies to be highly important in the advancement of one’s development in the field of engineering.

Self-efficacy in engineering, engineering identity, and coping in engineering have been shown in previous studies to be highly important in the advancement of one’s development in the field of engineering. Through the creation and deployment of a 17 question survey, undergraduate and first year masters students were asked to provide information on their engagement at their university, their demographic information, and to rank their level of agreement with 22 statements relating to the aforementioned ideas. Using the results from the collected data, exploratory factor analysis was completed to identify the factors that existed and any correlations. No statistically significant correlations between the identified three factors and demographic or engagement information were found. There needs to be a significant increase in the data sample size for statistically significant results to be found. Additionally, there is future work needed in the creation of an engagement measure that successfully reflects the level and impact of participation in engineering activities beyond traditional coursework.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Where Do I Belong: A Mixed Methods Study of Belonging for First-Year Commuter Student Success

Description

Many college campuses institute residency requirements intended to provide intentional support, engagement, and assistance in the transition into life as a first-year college student. However, first-year students opting to continue

Many college campuses institute residency requirements intended to provide intentional support, engagement, and assistance in the transition into life as a first-year college student. However, first-year students opting to continue living at home with family and commuting to campus each day has become a growing trend. This group of students can often be more sizable than some may assume and their developmental needs can be consistent with those of their on-campus peers. The objective of this mixed-methods action research study was to better understand how peer-to-peer experiences and opportunities are perceived and to describe and explore the concept of social capital and sense of belonging within the first-year commuter student population. This feeling of isolation can often expand to a lack of campus involvement and engagement in social opportunities. As a result of the perceived needs of this growing first-year commuter student population, a peer mentoring program was launched as a pilot to localize, personalize, and support students by providing a peer student leader in the form of a commuter peer mentor (CPM). Results from the qualitative and quantitative data collected as a part of this study demonstrated that first-year students value specific and easily-identified resources made available to their unique need cases and while many first-year commuter students may feel well supported and connected academically, they articulated challenges with social connections within the university setting. The understandings gained from this action research can inform higher education and student affairs practitioners as they seek to establish or improve programs, resources, and practices that intentionally and thoughtfully support first-year commuter students.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Re-thinking Engineering Doctoral Students’ Sense of Belonging: In Consideration of Diversity in Citizenship and Interpersonal Interactions

Description

A defining feature of many United States (U.S.) doctoral engineering programs is their large proportion of international students. Despite the large student body and the significant impacts that they bring

A defining feature of many United States (U.S.) doctoral engineering programs is their large proportion of international students. Despite the large student body and the significant impacts that they bring to the U.S. education and economy, a scarcity of research on engineering doctoral students has taken into consideration the existence of international students and the consequential diversity in citizenship among all students. This study was designed to bridge the research gap to improve the understanding of sense of belonging from the perspective of international engineering doctoral students.

A multi-phase mixed methods research approach was taken for this study. The qualitative strand focused on international engineering doctoral students’ sense of belonging and its constructs. Semi-structured interview data were collected from eight international students enrolled at engineering doctoral programs at four different institutions. Thematic analysis and further literature review produced a conceptual structure of sense of belonging among international engineering doctoral students: authentic-self, problem behavior, academic self-efficacy, academic belonging, sociocultural belonging, and perceived institutional support.

The quantitative strand of this study broadened the study’s population to all engineering doctoral students, including domestic students, and conducted comparative analyses between international and domestic student groups. An instrument to measure the Engineering Doctoral Students’ Quality of Interaction (EDQI instrument) was developed while considering the multicultural nature of interactions and the discipline-specific characteristics of engineering doctoral programs. Survey data were collected from 653 engineering doctoral students (383 domestic and 270 international) at 36 R1 institutions across the U.S. Exploratory Factor Analysis results confirmed the construct validity and reliability of the data collected from the instrument and indicated the factor structures for the students’ perceived quality interactions among domestic and international student groups. A set of separate regression analyses results indicated the significance of having meaningful interactions to students’ sense of belonging and identified the groups of people who make significant impacts on students’ sense of belonging for each subgroup. The emergent findings provide an understanding of the similarities and differences in the contributors of sense of belonging between international and domestic students, which can be used to develop tailored support structures for specific student groups.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Contested Citizenship in the Trump Era: The Policy Effects and Everyday Experiences of Mexican Undocu/DACAmented Collegians

Description

The oppressive legislative policies and polarizing media narratives of undocu/DACAmented Latinx im/migrants in the United States have created unfavorable campus climates, which have further marginalized those students in higher education

The oppressive legislative policies and polarizing media narratives of undocu/DACAmented Latinx im/migrants in the United States have created unfavorable campus climates, which have further marginalized those students in higher education who fit into this category. As a result of Donald Trump’s presidency and rescission of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program that soon followed, undocu/DACAmented Latinx students are experiencing an increase in stress, anxiety, and fear to the point that they become silent, depressed, and feel the need to advocate more for their existence and worth on campus. My critical ethnographic case study investigates the everyday experiences of Mexican undocu/DACAmented students enrolled at a public university in Arizona – a state that borders Mexico – as they pursue their undergraduate degrees in the Trump era. This study is guided by critical race theory and LatCrit, sense of belonging, and resistance capital theoretical frameworks, and seeks to answer the following: (a) how race and racism shape their collegiate experiences, (b) where these collegians find belongingness to persist towards graduation while navigating an anti-im/migrant sociopolitical climate, and (c) how these students exercise agency via their activism efforts. The broader case study includes individual collaborative interviews, twelve months of participatory field observations, and a collection of documents. This study aims to expand the field of higher education’s understanding of how federal, state, and institutional policies and policymakers affect undocu/DACAmented students’ experiences in and persistence through college, highlight the agency exercised and assets these collegians bring with them to college, and offer research, policy, and practical recommendations for higher education and student affairs institutional agents.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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The Role of Teen Centers Investing in the Success of Latinx Youth

Description

This study explores how a teen center within a local police department in California impacts the lives of local Latinx youth. Through a mixed methods approach of surveys, focus groups,

This study explores how a teen center within a local police department in California impacts the lives of local Latinx youth. Through a mixed methods approach of surveys, focus groups, and interviews, the study explores Mexican American youth, the most populous Latinx youth in the United States who are uniquely challenged by varying immigration statuses, mental health, and academic barriers. Theoretically, the study draws out intersections unique to the Latinx youth experiences growing up in America and engages in inter-disciplinary debates about inequities in health and education and policing practices. These intersections and debates are addressed through in-depth qualitative analysis of three participant groups: current youth participants of the teen center’s Youth Leadership Council (YLC), alumni of the YLC, and adult decision makers of the program. Pre- and post-surveys and focus groups are conducted with the youth participants over the span of a full year, while they take part in the teen center program, capturing how the teen center directly impacts their academic achievements, feelings of belonging, mental health, and attitudes towards law enforcement, over time. Interviews with alumni and key decision makers of the teen center further reveal broader patters in how the YLC program positively impacts the lives of Latinx youth and the challenges it faces when federal immigration enforcement complicates local policy relations with local communities.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019