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Behavior Trees + Finite State Machines: A Hybrid Game AI Framework

Description

One of the core components of many video games is their artificial intelligence. Through AI, a game can tell stories, generate challenges, and create encounters for the player to overcome. Even though AI has continued to advance through the implementation

One of the core components of many video games is their artificial intelligence. Through AI, a game can tell stories, generate challenges, and create encounters for the player to overcome. Even though AI has continued to advance through the implementation of neural networks and machine learning, game AI tends to implement a series of states or decisions instead to give the illusion of intelligence. Despite this limitation, games can still generate a wide range of experiences for the player. The Hybrid Game AI Framework is an AI system that combines the benefits of two commonly used approaches to developing game AI: Behavior Trees and Finite State Machines. Developed in the Unity Game Engine and the C# programming language, this AI Framework represents the research that went into studying modern approaches to game AI and my own attempt at implementing the techniques learned. Object-oriented programming concepts such as inheritance, abstraction, and low coupling are utilized with the intent to create game AI that's easy to implement and expand upon. The final goal was to create a flexible yet structured AI data structure while also minimizing drawbacks by combining Behavior Trees and Finite State Machines.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Technology Transformations: SmartAid - An Intelligent First Aid Kit

Description

SmartAid aims to target a small, yet relevant issue in a cost effective, easily replicable, and innovative manner. This paper outlines how to replicate the design and building process to create an intelligent first aid kit. SmartAid utilizes Alexa Voice

SmartAid aims to target a small, yet relevant issue in a cost effective, easily replicable, and innovative manner. This paper outlines how to replicate the design and building process to create an intelligent first aid kit. SmartAid utilizes Alexa Voice Service technologies to provide a new and improved way to teach users about the different types of first aid kit items and how to treat minor injuries, step by step. Using Alexa and RaspberryPi, SmartAid was designed as an added attachment to first aid kits. Alexa Services were installed into a RaspberryPi to create a custom Amazon device, and from there, using the Alexa Interaction Model and the Lambda function services, SmartAid was developed. After the designing and coding of the application, a user guide was created to provide users with information on what items are included in the first aid kit, what types of injuries can be treated through first aid, and how to use SmartAid. The
application was tested for its usability and practicality by a small sample of students. Users provided suggestions on how to make the application more versatile and functional, and confirmed that the application made first aid easier and was something that they could see themselves using. While this application is not aimed to replace the current physical guide solution completely, the findings of this project show that SmartAid has potential to stand in as an improved, easy to use, and convenient alternative for first aid guidance.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Development of an Educational Video Game

Description

The objective of this creative project was to gain experience in digital modeling, animation, coding, shader development and implementation, model integration techniques, and application of gaming principles and design through developing a professional educational game. The team collaborated with Glendale

The objective of this creative project was to gain experience in digital modeling, animation, coding, shader development and implementation, model integration techniques, and application of gaming principles and design through developing a professional educational game. The team collaborated with Glendale Community College (GCC) to produce an interactive product intended to supplement educational instructions regarding nutrition. The educational game developed, "Nutribots" features the player acting as a nutrition based nanobot sent to the small intestine to help the body. Throughout the game the player will be asked nutrition based questions to test their knowledge of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. If the player is unable to answer the question, they must use game mechanics to progress and receive the information as a reward. The level is completed as soon as the question is answered correctly. If the player answers the questions incorrectly twenty times within the entirety of the game, the team loses faith in the player, and the player must reset from title screen. This is to limit guessing and to make sure the player retains the information through repetition once it is demonstrated that they do not know the answers. The team was split into two different groups for the development of this game. The first part of the team developed models, animations, and textures using Autodesk Maya 2016 and Marvelous Designer. The second part of the team developed code and shaders, and implemented products from the first team using Unity and Visual Studio. Once a prototype of the game was developed, it was show-cased amongst peers to gain feedback. Upon receiving feedback, the team implemented the desired changes accordingly. Development for this project began on November 2015 and ended on April 2017. Special thanks to Laura Avila Department Chair and Jennifer Nolz from Glendale Community College Technology and Consumer Sciences, Food and Nutrition Department.

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Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Virtual Reality Drum Training System

Description

Can a skill taught in a virtual environment be utilized in the physical world? This idea is explored by creating a Virtual Reality game for the HTC Vive to teach users how to play the drums. The game focuses on

Can a skill taught in a virtual environment be utilized in the physical world? This idea is explored by creating a Virtual Reality game for the HTC Vive to teach users how to play the drums. The game focuses on developing the user's muscle memory, improving the user's ability to play music as they hear it in their head, and refining the user's sense of rhythm. Several different features were included to achieve this such as a score, different levels, a demo feature, and a metronome. The game was tested for its ability to teach and for its overall enjoyability by using a small sample group. Most participants of the sample group noted that they felt as if their sense of rhythm and drumming skill level would improve by playing the game. Through the findings of this project, it can be concluded that while it should not be considered as a complete replacement for traditional instruction, a virtual environment can be successfully used as a learning aid and practicing tool.

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Created

Date Created
2017-12

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Helix: A First Game Retrospective

Description

The original version of Helix, the one I pitched when first deciding to make a video game
for my thesis, is an action-platformer, with the intent of metroidvania-style progression
and an interconnected world map.

The current version of Helix is a

The original version of Helix, the one I pitched when first deciding to make a video game
for my thesis, is an action-platformer, with the intent of metroidvania-style progression
and an interconnected world map.

The current version of Helix is a turn based role-playing game, with the intent of roguelike
gameplay and a dark fantasy theme. We will first be exploring the challenges that came
with programming my own game - not quite from scratch, but also without a prebuilt
engine - then transition into game design and how Helix has evolved from its original form
to what we see today.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Assessing Adaptive Learning Styles in Computer Science Through a Virtual World

Description

Programming is quickly becoming as ubiquitous and essential a skill as general mathematics. However, many elementary and high school students are still not aware of what the computer science field entails. To make matters worse, students who are introduced to

Programming is quickly becoming as ubiquitous and essential a skill as general mathematics. However, many elementary and high school students are still not aware of what the computer science field entails. To make matters worse, students who are introduced to computer science are frequently being fed only part of what it is about rather than its entire construction. Consequently, they feel out of their depth when they approach college. Research has discovered that by teaching computer science and programming through a problem-driven approach and focusing on a combination of syntax and computational thinking, students can be prepared when entering higher levels of computer science education.

This thesis describes the design, development, and early user testing of a theory-based virtual world for computer science instruction called System Dot. System Dot was designed to visually manifest programming instructions into interactable objects, giving players a way to see coding as tangible entities rather than text on a white screen. In order for System Dot to convey the true nature of computer science, a custom predictive recursive descent parser was embedded in the program to validate any user-generated solutions to pre-defined logical platforming puzzles.

Steps were taken to adapt the virtual world to player behavior by creating a system to detect their learning style playing the game. Through a dynamic Bayesian network, System Dot aims to classify a player’s learning style based on the Felder-Sylverman Learning Style Model (FSLSM). Testers played through the first half of System Dot, which was enough to test out the Bayesian network and initial learning style classification. This classification was then compared to the assessment by Felder’s Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire (ILSQ). Lastly, this thesis will also discuss ways to use the results from the user testing to implement a personalized feedback system for the virtual world in the future and what has been learned through the learning style method.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017

Evaluating Tessellation and Screen-Space Ambient Occlusion in WebGL-Based Real-Time Application

Description

Tessellation and Screen-Space Ambient Occlusion are algorithms which have been widely-used in real-time rendering in the past decade. They aim to enhance the details of the mesh, cast better shadow effects and improve the quality of the rendered images in

Tessellation and Screen-Space Ambient Occlusion are algorithms which have been widely-used in real-time rendering in the past decade. They aim to enhance the details of the mesh, cast better shadow effects and improve the quality of the rendered images in real time. WebGL is a web-based graphics library derived from OpenGL ES used for rendering in web applications. It is relatively new and has been rapidly evolving, this has resulted in it supporting a subset of rendering features normally supported by desktop applications. In this thesis, the research is focusing on evaluating Curved PN-Triangles tessellation with Screen Space Ambient Occlusion (SSAO), Horizon-Based Ambient Occlusion (HBAO) and Horizon-Based Ambient Occlusion Plus (HBAO+) in WebGL-based real-time application and comparing its performance to desktop based application and to discuss the capabilities, limitations and bottlenecks of WebGL 1.0.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017