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Cluster metrics and temporal coherency in pixel based matrices

Description

In this thesis, the application of pixel-based vertical axes used within parallel coordinate plots is explored in an attempt to improve how existing tools can explain complex multivariate interactions across temporal data. Several promising visualization techniques are combined, such as:

In this thesis, the application of pixel-based vertical axes used within parallel coordinate plots is explored in an attempt to improve how existing tools can explain complex multivariate interactions across temporal data. Several promising visualization techniques are combined, such as: visual boosting to allow for quicker consumption of large data sets, the bond energy algorithm to find finer patterns and anomalies through contrast, multi-dimensional scaling, flow lines, user guided clustering, and row-column ordering. User input is applied on precomputed data sets to provide for real time interaction. General applicability of the techniques are tested against industrial trade, social networking, financial, and sparse data sets of varying dimensionality.

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Date Created
2014

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Combining thickness information with surface tensor-based morphometry for the 3D statistical analysis of the corpus callosum

Description

In blindness research, the corpus callosum (CC) is the most frequently studied sub-cortical structure, due to its important involvement in visual processing. While most callosal analyses from brain structural magnetic resonance images (MRI) are limited to the 2D mid-sagittal slice,

In blindness research, the corpus callosum (CC) is the most frequently studied sub-cortical structure, due to its important involvement in visual processing. While most callosal analyses from brain structural magnetic resonance images (MRI) are limited to the 2D mid-sagittal slice, we propose a novel framework to capture a complete set of 3D morphological differences in the corpus callosum between two groups of subjects. The CCs are segmented from whole brain T1-weighted MRI and modeled as 3D tetrahedral meshes. The callosal surface is divided into superior and inferior patches on which we compute a volumetric harmonic field by solving the Laplace's equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions. We adopt a refined tetrahedral mesh to compute the Laplacian operator, so our computation can achieve sub-voxel accuracy. Thickness is estimated by tracing the streamlines in the harmonic field. We combine areal changes found using surface tensor-based morphometry and thickness information into a vector at each vertex to be used as a metric for the statistical analysis. Group differences are assessed on this combined measure through Hotelling's T2 test. The method is applied to statistically compare three groups consisting of: congenitally blind (CB), late blind (LB; onset > 8 years old) and sighted (SC) subjects. Our results reveal significant differences in several regions of the CC between both blind groups and the sighted groups; and to a lesser extent between the LB and CB groups. These results demonstrate the crucial role of visual deprivation during the developmental period in reshaping the structural architecture of the CC.

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Date Created
2013

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Characterizing retinotopic mapping using conformal geometry and Beltrami coefficient: a preliminary study

Description

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to measure the retinotopic organization of early visual cortex in the human brain. Previous studies have identified multiple visual field maps (VFMs) based on statistical analysis of fMRI signals, but the

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to measure the retinotopic organization of early visual cortex in the human brain. Previous studies have identified multiple visual field maps (VFMs) based on statistical analysis of fMRI signals, but the resulting geometry has not been fully characterized with mathematical models. This thesis explores using concepts from computational conformal geometry to create a custom software framework for examining and generating quantitative mathematical models for characterizing the geometry of early visual areas in the human brain. The software framework includes a graphical user interface built on top of a selected core conformal flattening algorithm and various software tools compiled specifically for processing and examining retinotopic data. Three conformal flattening algorithms were implemented and evaluated for speed and how well they preserve the conformal metric. All three algorithms performed well in preserving the conformal metric but the speed and stability of the algorithms varied. The software framework performed correctly on actual retinotopic data collected using the standard travelling-wave experiment. Preliminary analysis of the Beltrami coefficient for the early data set shows that selected regions of V1 that contain reasonably smooth eccentricity and polar angle gradients do show significant local conformality, warranting further investigation of this approach for analysis of early and higher visual cortex.

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2013

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Visual analytics for spatiotemporal cluster analysis

Description

Traditionally, visualization is one of the most important and commonly used methods of generating insight into large scale data. Particularly for spatiotemporal data, the translation of such data into a visual form allows users to quickly see patterns, explore summaries

Traditionally, visualization is one of the most important and commonly used methods of generating insight into large scale data. Particularly for spatiotemporal data, the translation of such data into a visual form allows users to quickly see patterns, explore summaries and relate domain knowledge about underlying geographical phenomena that would not be apparent in tabular form. However, several critical challenges arise when visualizing and exploring these large spatiotemporal datasets. While, the underlying geographical component of the data lends itself well to univariate visualization in the form of traditional cartographic representations (e.g., choropleth, isopleth, dasymetric maps), as the data becomes multivariate, cartographic representations become more complex. To simplify the visual representations, analytical methods such as clustering and feature extraction are often applied as part of the classification phase. The automatic classification can then be rendered onto a map; however, one common issue in data classification is that items near a classification boundary are often mislabeled.

This thesis explores methods to augment the automated spatial classification by utilizing interactive machine learning as part of the cluster creation step. First, this thesis explores the design space for spatiotemporal analysis through the development of a comprehensive data wrangling and exploratory data analysis platform. Second, this system is augmented with a novel method for evaluating the visual impact of edge cases for multivariate geographic projections. Finally, system features and functionality are demonstrated through a series of case studies, with key features including similarity analysis, multivariate clustering, and novel visual support for cluster comparison.

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Date Created
2016

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Vectorization in analyzing 2D/3D data

Description

Vectorization is an important process in the fields of graphics and image processing. In computer-aided design (CAD), drawings are scanned, vectorized and written as CAD files in a process called paper-to-CAD conversion or drawing conversion. In geographic information systems (GIS),

Vectorization is an important process in the fields of graphics and image processing. In computer-aided design (CAD), drawings are scanned, vectorized and written as CAD files in a process called paper-to-CAD conversion or drawing conversion. In geographic information systems (GIS), satellite or aerial images are vectorized to create maps. In graphic design and photography, raster graphics can be vectorized for easier usage and resizing. Vector arts are popular as online contents. Vectorization takes raster images, point clouds, or a series of scattered data samples in space, outputs graphic elements of various types including points, lines, curves, polygons, parametric curves and surface patches. The vectorized representations consist of a different set of components and elements from that of the inputs. The change of representation is the key difference between vectorization and practices such as smoothing and filtering. Compared to the inputs, the vector outputs provide higher order of control and attributes such as smoothness. Their curvatures or gradients at the points are scale invariant and they are more robust data sources for downstream applications and analysis. This dissertation explores and broadens the scope of vectorization in various contexts. I propose a novel vectorization algorithm on raster images along with several new applications for vectorization mechanism in processing and analysing both 2D and 3D data sets. The main components of the research are: using vectorization in generating 3D models from 2D floor plans; a novel raster image vectorization methods and its applications in computer vision, image processing, and animation; and vectorization in visualizing and information extraction in 3D laser scan data. I also apply vectorization analysis towards human body scans and rock surface scans to show insights otherwise difficult to obtain.

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Date Created
2016

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System-level synthesis of dataplane subsystems for MPSoCs

Description

In recent years we have witnessed a shift towards multi-processor system-on-chips (MPSoCs) to address the demands of embedded devices (such as cell phones, GPS devices, luxury car features, etc.). Highly optimized MPSoCs are well-suited to tackle the complex application demands

In recent years we have witnessed a shift towards multi-processor system-on-chips (MPSoCs) to address the demands of embedded devices (such as cell phones, GPS devices, luxury car features, etc.). Highly optimized MPSoCs are well-suited to tackle the complex application demands desired by the end user customer. These MPSoCs incorporate a constellation of heterogeneous processing elements (PEs) (general purpose PEs and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICS)). A typical MPSoC will be composed of a application processor, such as an ARM Coretex-A9 with cache coherent memory hierarchy, and several application sub-systems. Each of these sub-systems are composed of highly optimized instruction processors, graphics/DSP processors, and custom hardware accelerators. Typically, these sub-systems utilize scratchpad memories (SPM) rather than support cache coherency. The overall architecture is an integration of the various sub-systems through a high bandwidth system-level interconnect (such as a Network-on-Chip (NoC)). The shift to MPSoCs has been fueled by three major factors: demand for high performance, the use of component libraries, and short design turn around time. As customers continue to desire more and more complex applications on their embedded devices the performance demand for these devices continues to increase. Designers have turned to using MPSoCs to address this demand. By using pre-made IP libraries designers can quickly piece together a MPSoC that will meet the application demands of the end user with minimal time spent designing new hardware. Additionally, the use of MPSoCs allows designers to generate new devices very quickly and thus reducing the time to market. In this work, a complete MPSoC synthesis design flow is presented. We first present a technique \cite{leary1_intro} to address the synthesis of the interconnect architecture (particularly Network-on-Chip (NoC)). We then address the synthesis of the memory architecture of a MPSoC sub-system \cite{leary2_intro}. Lastly, we present a co-synthesis technique to generate the functional and memory architectures simultaneously. The validity and quality of each synthesis technique is demonstrated through extensive experimentation.

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Date Created
2013

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3D rooftop detection and modeling using orthographic aerial images

Description

Detection of extruded features like rooftops and trees in aerial images automatically is a very active area of research. Elevated features identified from aerial imagery have potential applications in urban planning, identifying cover in military training or flight training. Detection

Detection of extruded features like rooftops and trees in aerial images automatically is a very active area of research. Elevated features identified from aerial imagery have potential applications in urban planning, identifying cover in military training or flight training. Detection of such features using commonly available geospatial data like orthographic aerial imagery is very challenging because rooftop and tree textures are often camouflaged by similar looking features like roads, ground and grass. So, additonal data such as LIDAR, multispectral imagery and multiple viewpoints are exploited for more accurate detection. However, such data is often not available, or may be improperly registered or inacurate. In this thesis, we discuss a novel framework that only uses orthographic images for detection and modeling of rooftops. A segmentation scheme that initializes by assigning either foreground (rooftop) or background labels to certain pixels in the image based on shadows is proposed. Then it employs grabcut to assign one of those two labels to the rest of the pixels based on initial labeling. Parametric model fitting is performed on the segmented results in order to create a 3D scene and to facilitate roof-shape and height estimation. The framework can also benefit from additional geospatial data such as streetmaps and LIDAR, if available.

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Date Created
2013

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Cascading curtainmap: an interactive visualization for depicting large and flexible hierarchies

Description

In visualizing information hierarchies, icicle plots are efficient diagrams in that they provide the user a straightforward layout for different levels of data in a hierarchy and enable the user to compare items based on the item width. However, as

In visualizing information hierarchies, icicle plots are efficient diagrams in that they provide the user a straightforward layout for different levels of data in a hierarchy and enable the user to compare items based on the item width. However, as the size of the hierarchy grows large, the items in an icicle plot end up being small and indistinguishable. In this thesis, by maintaining the positive characteristics of traditional

icicle plots and incorporating new features such as dynamic diagram and active layer, we developed an interactive visualization that allows the user to selectively drill down or roll up to review different levels of data in a large hierarchy, to change the hierarchical

structure to detect potential patterns, and to maintain an overall understanding of the

current hierarchical structure.

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Date Created
2014

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Generating and exploring design variations for architectural and urban layouts

Description

This thesis focuses on generating and exploring design variations for architectural and urban layouts. I propose to study this general problem in three selected contexts.

First, I introduce a framework to generate many variations of a facade design that look similar

This thesis focuses on generating and exploring design variations for architectural and urban layouts. I propose to study this general problem in three selected contexts.

First, I introduce a framework to generate many variations of a facade design that look similar to a given facade layout. Starting from an input image, the facade is hierarchically segmented and labeled with a collection of manual and automatic tools. The user can then model constraints that should be maintained in any variation of the input facade design. Subsequently, facade variations are generated for different facade sizes, where multiple variations can be produced for a certain size.

Second, I propose a method for a user to understand and systematically explore good building layouts. Starting from a discrete set of good layouts, I analytically characterize the local shape space of good layouts around each initial layout, compactly encode these spaces, and link them to support transitions across the different local spaces. I represent such transitions in the form of a portal graph. The user can then use the portal graph, along with the family of local shape spaces, to globally and locally explore the space of good building layouts.

Finally, I propose an algorithm to computationally design street networks that balance competing requirements such as quick travel time and reduced through traffic in residential neighborhoods. The user simply provides high-level functional specifications for a target neighborhood, while my algorithm best satisfies the specification by solving for both connectivity and geometric layout of the network.

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Date Created
2014

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Connectivity control for quad-dominant meshes

Description

Quad-dominant (QD) meshes, i.e., three-dimensional, 2-manifold polygonal meshes comprising mostly four-sided faces (i.e., quads), are a popular choice for many applications such as polygonal shape modeling, computer animation, base meshes for spline and subdivision surface, simulation, and architectural design. This

Quad-dominant (QD) meshes, i.e., three-dimensional, 2-manifold polygonal meshes comprising mostly four-sided faces (i.e., quads), are a popular choice for many applications such as polygonal shape modeling, computer animation, base meshes for spline and subdivision surface, simulation, and architectural design. This thesis investigates the topic of connectivity control, i.e., exploring different choices of mesh connectivity to represent the same 3D shape or surface. One key concept of QD mesh connectivity is the distinction between regular and irregular elements: a vertex with valence 4 is regular; otherwise, it is irregular. In a similar sense, a face with four sides is regular; otherwise, it is irregular. For QD meshes, the placement of irregular elements is especially important since it largely determines the achievable geometric quality of the final mesh.

Traditionally, the research on QD meshes focuses on the automatic generation of pure quadrilateral or QD meshes from a given surface. Explicit control of the placement of irregular elements can only be achieved indirectly. To fill this gap, in this thesis, we make the following contributions. First, we formulate the theoretical background about the fundamental combinatorial properties of irregular elements in QD meshes. Second, we develop algorithms for the explicit control of irregular elements and the exhaustive enumeration of QD mesh connectivities. Finally, we demonstrate the importance of connectivity control for QD meshes in a wide range of applications.

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Date Created
2014