Matching Items (18)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

133413-Thumbnail Image.png

Linear Modeling for Insurance Ratemaking/Reserving: Modeling Loss Development Factors for Catastrophe Claims

Description

Catastrophe events occur rather infrequently, but upon their occurrence, can lead to colossal losses for insurance companies. Due to their size and volatility, catastrophe losses are often treated separately from other insurance losses. In fact, many property and casualty insurance

Catastrophe events occur rather infrequently, but upon their occurrence, can lead to colossal losses for insurance companies. Due to their size and volatility, catastrophe losses are often treated separately from other insurance losses. In fact, many property and casualty insurance companies feature a department or team which focuses solely on modeling catastrophes. Setting reserves for catastrophe losses is difficult due to their unpredictable and often long-tailed nature. Determining loss development factors (LDFs) to estimate the ultimate loss amounts for catastrophe events is one method for setting reserves. In an attempt to aid Company XYZ set more accurate reserves, the research conducted focuses on estimating LDFs for catastrophes which have already occurred and have been settled. Furthermore, the research describes the process used to build a linear model in R to estimate LDFs for Company XYZ's closed catastrophe claims from 2001 \u2014 2016. This linear model was used to predict a catastrophe's LDFs based on the age in weeks of the catastrophe during the first year. Back testing was also performed, as was the comparison between the estimated ultimate losses and actual losses. Future research consideration was proposed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

135246-Thumbnail Image.png

Automated Testing of Web Services

Description

The areas of cloud computing and web services have grown rapidly in recent years, resulting in software that is more interconnected and and widely used than ever before. As a result of this proliferation, there needs to be a way

The areas of cloud computing and web services have grown rapidly in recent years, resulting in software that is more interconnected and and widely used than ever before. As a result of this proliferation, there needs to be a way to assess the quality of these web services in order to ensure their reliability and accuracy. This project explores different ways in which services can be tested and evaluated through the design of various testing techniques and their implementations in a web application, which can be used by students or developers to test their web services.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2016-05

135251-Thumbnail Image.png

Approaches to Minimum d-Degree Arrangement

Description

Many systems in the world \u2014 such as cellular networks, the post service, or transportation pathways \u2014 can be modeled as networks or graphs. The practical applications of graph algorithms generally seek to achieve some goal while minimizing some cost

Many systems in the world \u2014 such as cellular networks, the post service, or transportation pathways \u2014 can be modeled as networks or graphs. The practical applications of graph algorithms generally seek to achieve some goal while minimizing some cost such as money or distance. While the minimum linear arrangement (MLA) problem has been widely-studied amongst graph ordering and embedding problems, there have been no developments into versions of the problem involving degree higher than 2. An application of our problem can be seen in overlay networks in telecommunications. An overlay network is a virtual network that is built on top of another network. It is a logical network where the links between nodes represent the physical paths connecting the nodes in the underlying infrastructure. The underlying physical network may be incomplete, but as long as it is connected, we can build a complete overlay network on top of it. Since some nodes may be overloaded by traffic, we can reduce the strain on the overlay network by limiting the communication between nodes. Some edges, however, may have more importance than others so we must be careful about our selection of which nodes are allowed to communicate with each other. The balance of reducing the degree of the network while maximizing communication forms the basis of our d-degree minimum arrangement problem. In this thesis we will look at several approaches to solving the generalized d-degree minimum arrangement d-MA problem where we embed a graph onto a subgraph of a given degree. We first look into the requirements and challenges of solving the d-MA problem. We will then present a polynomial-time heuristic and compare its performance with the optimal solution derived from integer linear programming. We will show that a simple (d-1)-ary tree construction provides the optimal structure for uniform graphs with large requests sets. Finally, we will present experimental data gathered from running simulations on a variety of graphs to evaluate the efficiency of our heuristic and tree construction.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2016-05

134914-Thumbnail Image.png

Collaborative Computation in Self-Organizing Particle Systems

Description

Many forms of programmable matter have been proposed for various tasks. We use an abstract model of self-organizing particle systems for programmable matter which could be used for a variety of applications, including smart paint and coating materials for engineering

Many forms of programmable matter have been proposed for various tasks. We use an abstract model of self-organizing particle systems for programmable matter which could be used for a variety of applications, including smart paint and coating materials for engineering or programmable cells for medical uses. Previous research using this model has focused on shape formation and other spatial configuration problems, including line formation, compression, and coating. In this work we study foundational computational tasks that exceed the capabilities of the individual constant memory particles described by the model. These tasks represent new ways to use these self-organizing systems, which, in conjunction with previous shape and configuration work, make the systems useful for a wider variety of tasks. We present an implementation of a counter using a line of particles, which makes it possible for the line of particles to count to and store values much larger than their individual capacities. We then present an algorithm that takes a matrix and a vector as input and then sets up and uses a rectangular block of particles to compute the matrix-vector multiplication. This setup also utilizes the counter implementation to store the resulting vector from the matrix-vector multiplication. Operations such as counting and matrix multiplication can leverage the distributed and dynamic nature of the self-organizing system to be more efficient and adaptable than on traditional linear computing hardware. Such computational tools also give the systems more power to make complex decisions when adapting to new situations or to analyze the data they collect, reducing reliance on a central controller for setup and output processing. Finally, we demonstrate an application of similar types of computations with self-organizing systems to image processing, with an implementation of an image edge detection algorithm.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2016-12

135739-Thumbnail Image.png

Compression in Self-Organizing Particle Systems

Description

Many programmable matter systems have been proposed and realized recently, each often tailored toward a particular task or physical setting. In our work on self-organizing particle systems, we abstract away from specific settings and instead describe programmable matter as a

Many programmable matter systems have been proposed and realized recently, each often tailored toward a particular task or physical setting. In our work on self-organizing particle systems, we abstract away from specific settings and instead describe programmable matter as a collection of simple computational elements (to be referred to as particles) with limited computational power that each perform fully distributed, local, asynchronous algorithms to solve system-wide problems of movement, configuration, and coordination. In this thesis, we focus on the compression problem, in which the particle system gathers as tightly together as possible, as in a sphere or its equivalent in the presence of some underlying geometry. While there are many ways to formalize what it means for a particle system to be compressed, we address three different notions of compression: (1) local compression, in which each individual particle utilizes local rules to create an overall convex structure containing no holes, (2) hole elimination, in which the particle system seeks to detect and eliminate any holes it contains, and (3) alpha-compression, in which the particle system seeks to shrink its perimeter to be within a constant factor of the minimum possible value. We analyze the behavior of each of these algorithms, examining correctness and convergence where appropriate. In the case of the Markov Chain Algorithm for Compression, we provide improvements to the original bounds for the bias parameter lambda which influences the system to either compress or expand. Lastly, we briefly discuss contributions to the problem of leader election--in which a particle system elects a single leader--since it acts as an important prerequisite for compression algorithms that use a predetermined seed particle.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2016-05

136549-Thumbnail Image.png

Expansion Algorithms in Self-Organizing Particle Systems

Description

A primary goal in computer science is to develop autonomous systems. Usually, we provide computers with tasks and rules for completing those tasks, but what if we could extend this type of system to physical technology as well? In the

A primary goal in computer science is to develop autonomous systems. Usually, we provide computers with tasks and rules for completing those tasks, but what if we could extend this type of system to physical technology as well? In the field of programmable matter, researchers are tasked with developing synthetic materials that can change their physical properties \u2014 such as color, density, and even shape \u2014 based on predefined rules or continuous, autonomous collection of input. In this research, we are most interested in particles that can perform computations, bond with other particles, and move. In this paper, we provide a theoretical particle model that can be used to simulate the performance of such physical particle systems, as well as an algorithm to perform expansion, wherein these particles can be used to enclose spaces or even objects.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-05

136516-Thumbnail Image.png

Categorizing and Discovering Social Bots

Description

Bots tamper with social media networks by artificially inflating the popularity of certain topics. In this paper, we define what a bot is, we detail different motivations for bots, we describe previous work in bot detection and observation, and then

Bots tamper with social media networks by artificially inflating the popularity of certain topics. In this paper, we define what a bot is, we detail different motivations for bots, we describe previous work in bot detection and observation, and then we perform bot detection of our own. For our bot detection, we are interested in bots on Twitter that tweet Arabic extremist-like phrases. A testing dataset is collected using the honeypot method, and five different heuristics are measured for their effectiveness in detecting bots. The model underperformed, but we have laid the ground-work for a vastly untapped focus on bot detection: extremist ideal diffusion through bots.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2015-05

136691-Thumbnail Image.png

Post-Optimization of Permutation Coverings

Description

Covering subsequences with sets of permutations arises in many applications, including event-sequence testing. Given a set of subsequences to cover, one is often interested in knowing the fewest number of permutations required to cover each subsequence, and in finding an

Covering subsequences with sets of permutations arises in many applications, including event-sequence testing. Given a set of subsequences to cover, one is often interested in knowing the fewest number of permutations required to cover each subsequence, and in finding an explicit construction of such a set of permutations that has size close to or equal to the minimum possible. The construction of such permutation coverings has proven to be computationally difficult. While many examples for permutations of small length have been found, and strong asymptotic behavior is known, there are few explicit constructions for permutations of intermediate lengths. Most of these are generated from scratch using greedy algorithms. We explore a different approach here. Starting with a set of permutations with the desired coverage properties, we compute local changes to individual permutations that retain the total coverage of the set. By choosing these local changes so as to make one permutation less "essential" in maintaining the coverage of the set, our method attempts to make a permutation completely non-essential, so it can be removed without sacrificing total coverage. We develop a post-optimization method to do this and present results on sequence covering arrays and other types of permutation covering problems demonstrating that it is surprisingly effective.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2014-12

131525-Thumbnail Image.png

Helix: A First Game Retrospective

Description

The original version of Helix, the one I pitched when first deciding to make a video game
for my thesis, is an action-platformer, with the intent of metroidvania-style progression
and an interconnected world map.

The current version of Helix is a

The original version of Helix, the one I pitched when first deciding to make a video game
for my thesis, is an action-platformer, with the intent of metroidvania-style progression
and an interconnected world map.

The current version of Helix is a turn based role-playing game, with the intent of roguelike
gameplay and a dark fantasy theme. We will first be exploring the challenges that came
with programming my own game - not quite from scratch, but also without a prebuilt
engine - then transition into game design and how Helix has evolved from its original form
to what we see today.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2020-05

132267-Thumbnail Image.png

Homeward Bound: An Overview of Continuing Care at Home

Description

AARP estimates that 90% of seniors wish to remain in their homes during retirement. Seniors need assistance as they age, historically they have received assistance from either family members, nursing homes, or Continuing Care Retirement Communities. For seniors not wanting

AARP estimates that 90% of seniors wish to remain in their homes during retirement. Seniors need assistance as they age, historically they have received assistance from either family members, nursing homes, or Continuing Care Retirement Communities. For seniors not wanting any of these options, there has been very few alternatives. Now, the emergence of the continuing care at home program is providing hope for a different method of elder care moving forward. CCaH programs offer services such as: skilled nursing care, care coordination, emergency response systems, aid with personal and health care, and transportation. Such services allow seniors to continue to live in their own home with assistance as their health deteriorates over time. Currently, only 30 CCaH programs exist. With the growth of the elderly population in the coming years, this model seems poised for growth.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05