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Wireless network design and optimization: from social awareness to security

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A principal goal of this dissertation is to study wireless network design and optimization with the focus on two perspectives: 1) socially-aware mobile networking and computing; 2) security and privacy in wireless networking. Under this common theme, this dissertation can

A principal goal of this dissertation is to study wireless network design and optimization with the focus on two perspectives: 1) socially-aware mobile networking and computing; 2) security and privacy in wireless networking. Under this common theme, this dissertation can be broadly organized into three parts.

The first part studies socially-aware mobile networking and computing. First, it studies random access control and power control under a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework. The socially-aware Nash equilibria (SNEs) are derived and analyzed. Then, it studies mobile crowdsensing under an incentive mechanism that exploits social trust assisted reciprocity (STAR). The efficacy of the STAR mechanism is thoroughly investigated. Next, it studies mobile users' data usage behaviors under the impact of social services and the wireless operator's pricing. Based on a two-stage Stackelberg game formulation, the user demand equilibrium (UDE) is analyzed in Stage II and the optimal pricing strategy is developed in Stage I. Last, it studies opportunistic cooperative networking under an optimal stopping framework with two-level decision-making. For both cases with or without dedicated relays, the optimal relaying strategies are derived and analyzed.

The second part studies radar sensor network coverage for physical security. First, it studies placement of bistatic radar (BR) sensor networks for barrier coverage. The optimality of line-based placement is analyzed, and the optimal placement of BRs on a line segment is characterized. Then, it studies the coverage of radar sensor networks that exploits the Doppler effect. Based on a Doppler coverage model, an efficient method is devised to characterize Doppler-covered regions and an algorithm is developed to find the minimum radar density required for Doppler coverage.

The third part studies cyber security and privacy in socially-aware networking and computing. First, it studies random access control, cooperative jamming, and spectrum access under an extended SGUM framework that incorporates negative social ties. The SNEs are derived and analyzed. Then, it studies pseudonym change for personalized location privacy under the SGUM framework. The SNEs are analyzed and an efficient algorithm is developed to find an SNE with desirable properties.

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2015

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Observability methods in sensor scheduling

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Modern measurement schemes for linear dynamical systems are typically designed so that different sensors can be scheduled to be used at each time step. To determine which sensors to use, various metrics have been suggested. One possible such metric is

Modern measurement schemes for linear dynamical systems are typically designed so that different sensors can be scheduled to be used at each time step. To determine which sensors to use, various metrics have been suggested. One possible such metric is the observability of the system. Observability is a binary condition determining whether a finite number of measurements suffice to recover the initial state. However to employ observability for sensor scheduling, the binary definition needs to be expanded so that one can measure how observable a system is with a particular measurement scheme, i.e. one needs a metric of observability. Most methods utilizing an observability metric are about sensor selection and not for sensor scheduling. In this dissertation we present a new approach to utilize the observability for sensor scheduling by employing the condition number of the observability matrix as the metric and using column subset selection to create an algorithm to choose which sensors to use at each time step. To this end we use a rank revealing QR factorization algorithm to select sensors. Several numerical experiments are used to demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

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2015

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Statistical and dynamical modeling of Riemannian trajectories with application to human movement analysis

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The data explosion in the past decade is in part due to the widespread use of rich sensors that measure various physical phenomenon -- gyroscopes that measure orientation in phones and fitness devices, the Microsoft Kinect which measures depth information,

The data explosion in the past decade is in part due to the widespread use of rich sensors that measure various physical phenomenon -- gyroscopes that measure orientation in phones and fitness devices, the Microsoft Kinect which measures depth information, etc. A typical application requires inferring the underlying physical phenomenon from data, which is done using machine learning. A fundamental assumption in training models is that the data is Euclidean, i.e. the metric is the standard Euclidean distance governed by the L-2 norm. However in many cases this assumption is violated, when the data lies on non Euclidean spaces such as Riemannian manifolds. While the underlying geometry accounts for the non-linearity, accurate analysis of human activity also requires temporal information to be taken into account. Human movement has a natural interpretation as a trajectory on the underlying feature manifold, as it evolves smoothly in time. A commonly occurring theme in many emerging problems is the need to \emph{represent, compare, and manipulate} such trajectories in a manner that respects the geometric constraints. This dissertation is a comprehensive treatise on modeling Riemannian trajectories to understand and exploit their statistical and dynamical properties. Such properties allow us to formulate novel representations for Riemannian trajectories. For example, the physical constraints on human movement are rarely considered, which results in an unnecessarily large space of features, making search, classification and other applications more complicated. Exploiting statistical properties can help us understand the \emph{true} space of such trajectories. In applications such as stroke rehabilitation where there is a need to differentiate between very similar kinds of movement, dynamical properties can be much more effective. In this regard, we propose a generalization to the Lyapunov exponent to Riemannian manifolds and show its effectiveness for human activity analysis. The theory developed in this thesis naturally leads to several benefits in areas such as data mining, compression, dimensionality reduction, classification, and regression.

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2016