Matching Items (14)

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The Respect Movement: An Evaluation of a Student-Driven Sexual Assault Intervention at Arizona State University

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Abstract: This purpose of this paper is to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of a student-driven sexual assault intervention at Arizona State University. The first aim is to develop a

Abstract: This purpose of this paper is to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of a student-driven sexual assault intervention at Arizona State University. The first aim is to develop a theoretical framework of the organization and its relation to the Integrated Behavioral Health model. The second aim analyze change in attitudes and beliefs about sexual violence and bystander behaviors as well as barriers and facilitators of change including perceived control and self-efficacy for students involved in the Respect Movement. The final aim is to analyze how this change transmits through the broader social network of students involved in the Respect Movement.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

Loss of Language: A Designed Exhibit and Campaign on the Widespread Social Issue of Loss of First Language in the United States

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This is a collection on research into, and designed pieces pertaining to, the loss of language in the USA. In particular, the analysis and social consequences of English-as-a-second-language learners losing

This is a collection on research into, and designed pieces pertaining to, the loss of language in the USA. In particular, the analysis and social consequences of English-as-a-second-language learners losing their native language as they progress through American society. A number of factors have caused many American immigrants or natives to lose their first or family language, causing a cascade of personal and societal issues that range from educational deficiencies to federal and healthcare system failures.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Students Organize for Syria: A Student Led Initiative

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Students Organize for Syria (SOS) is the student led initiative for Syria. With 18 registered chapters across the United States, this student organization is targeting a multidimensional cause by different

Students Organize for Syria (SOS) is the student led initiative for Syria. With 18 registered chapters across the United States, this student organization is targeting a multidimensional cause by different means. Though it is now a national movement, it started off with one group at Arizona State University, with one student. Zana Alattar, founder and student director of SOS, tells the story of how she took an ASU organization, Save Our Syrian Freedom (SOS Freedom), to the national level as SOS. As a pre-medical student, she also combines her work in human rights with her future in healthcare. After all, health and human rights have long maintained a synergistic relationship.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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How Different Kinds of Media Drive Social Change: A Black Lives Matter Case Study

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As America undergoes a modern, civil rights movement, the reality of police brutality can no longer be disregarded by everyday voters. The Black Lives Matter movement has become ubiquitous, both

As America undergoes a modern, civil rights movement, the reality of police brutality can no longer be disregarded by everyday voters. The Black Lives Matter movement has become ubiquitous, both in real life and in the media, after the murder of George Floyd. This moment has made way for widespread video coverage of police brutality incidents, a litany of written think pieces dissecting the long-term effectiveness of the police, and a myriad of articles discussing prospective policy actions. With a rise in coverage comes a heightened level of awareness of and conversation around this issue. We have witnessed the pervasiveness of the Black Lives Matter movement and an increasing conversation around the allocation of funding towards police departments. Change has been sparked, but which form of media has most effectively influenced the public? Seeing as one of the principal goals of police-related advocacy groups is to fulfill their vision of a properly functioning police force, including in relation to accountability and reform, it is vital to understand which medium the public is most receptive to. This study and its design serve to examine how exposure to different media regarding police brutality affects people’s opinions on Black Lives Matter, police reform policies, and similar changes. Moving forward, social movements will have a better understanding of which types of media can best target the public when trying to coalesce support around their movement.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Influence of Mobile Phones Upon the Social and Economic Norms of Urban Morocco

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The widespread and rapid adoption of mobile phones into urban Morocco is significantly impacting the lives of middle to lower class individuals who interact with this technology. These impacts fall

The widespread and rapid adoption of mobile phones into urban Morocco is significantly impacting the lives of middle to lower class individuals who interact with this technology. These impacts fall into one of two societal spheres: social and economic. Socially, mobile phone use is altering the way that place-making practices, time construction, and gender roles are being negotiated. These changes are brought about by the phenomena of time/space compression and constant connectivity that these devices enable. Economically, cell phone use is enabling an ease and efficiency of communication that significantly reduces the costs of information transfer. For micro-entrepreneurs, this cost reduction activates pre-existing social networks and generates job opportunities and social status in ways never before possible. The cumulative result of these social and economic shifts is the creation of societal gap that runs down a technological fault line, fundamentally differentiating the day-to-day strategies of those who interact with mobile phones from those who do not.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Like, Share, Rinse, Retweet: How Millennials Are Using Technology to Accelerte Social Change

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In 2014, we are seeing change on social issues such as same-sex marriage and marijuana legalization at a rate that is visibly faster than major social issues of the past.

In 2014, we are seeing change on social issues such as same-sex marriage and marijuana legalization at a rate that is visibly faster than major social issues of the past. Statistics show that these issues are fan-favorites with the millennial generation, while also showing that this same group overwhelmingly dominates popular online platforms, a major tool that social issues of the past lacked. This study aims to examine whether or not there is a correlation between the online presence of millennials, the coverage by the media, and the policy-making decisions by legislators. With that idea in mind, perhaps we can prove that millennials have the ability to set the stage for social change. The instantaneous supply and demand of the Internet has created a climate where responses to our questions and ideas are expected faster than ever. By better understanding the dynamics of the relationships between these three groups, perhaps we can find solutions for creating change faster and more effectively.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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VERSING INHERITANCE: THEORY, POETRY, POLITICS

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Theory has often been historically characterized as lacking pragmatisms and action necessary for social change. Thus, as this challenge between pragmatists and theorists continues to exist, this project attempts to

Theory has often been historically characterized as lacking pragmatisms and action necessary for social change. Thus, as this challenge between pragmatists and theorists continues to exist, this project attempts to disclose a manner in which we may alter this conflict by reinterpreting theory, poetry, and philosophy as active political moments of resistance that fundamentally change our ethical relationship with language and consequently to others. This thesis recognizes that dire political situations of social injustice require a more materialistic and sociological analysis in order to achieve structural reform for marginalized groups. However, this work attempts to show how an ethical relationship with theory, poetry, and philosophy is requisite to cultural and material change, as these meditative ways of thinking hold a stake in the overall discussion of social progress as well.

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Date Created
  • 2014-12

Engineering – The Social Experiment: An Analysis of Engineering Curriculum and Industry Expectations

Description

The engineers of the future are currently in the process of earning their degrees and certifications from engineering programs guided by ABET accreditations. ABET, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and

The engineers of the future are currently in the process of earning their degrees and certifications from engineering programs guided by ABET accreditations. ABET, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, is the voice of reason for the development of engineering programs. Aspiring engineers desire institutions that follow ABET Standards to ensure that their education meets the expectations of industry partners and researchers. However, these standards have not been drastically altered in years to reflect the changing needs of industry. With the advancement of technology in the last two decades, old school engineering and its application is becoming less common.

Science policy and curriculum go hand in. The future engineers are taught hand calculations, lab testing for field work parallels, and methodologies based on the written policies set forth decades ago. Technology today is rapidly changing, and engineering education is struggling to make changes to keep up with these technology advancements. In today’s world, technology drives invention and innovation, whereas some argue it is thought and curiosity. Engineering programs are taking a toll regardless of the point of view. Education is not made to keep up with current societal needs.

This paper a provides an overview of the history of engineering, curriculum standards for engineering programs, an analysis of engineering programs at top universities and large universities alongside student experiences available to engineers. The ideas offered are no means the exact solution; rather policymakers and STEM education stakeholder may find the ideas shared helpful and use them as a catalyst for change.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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Banning corporal punishment in Taiwan: a narrative exploration of teacher change and critical examination of the legal ban

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Employing narrative ways of inquiry, this study interrogated how a reform action--legal banning corporal punishment in schools, which was intentionally introduced into Taiwanese society by advocates as a social movement

Employing narrative ways of inquiry, this study interrogated how a reform action--legal banning corporal punishment in schools, which was intentionally introduced into Taiwanese society by advocates as a social movement strategy at a time when the incidence rate of school corporal punishment was high--could contribute to ending educators' use of corporal punishment. From the narratives of the teachers who believed in corporal punishment, we see how the school system itself contributed to passing, mostly without educators' consciousness of doing so, from one generation to another, a punitive mind that deems punishment a necessity and humans to be incapable of self-regulation without extrinsic force. It is this punitive way of thinking, deeply rooted in Taiwanese culture that was challenged by the legal ban. The transformation of the punitive mind requires a psychological subject-object perspective move that allows the mind to break the identification with a previously built teacher identity submitting to coercive authority. Alternative values, beliefs, and ideas--particularly the caring, trusting, respectful and persuasive approaches to interpersonal relationship--must be brought into personal experiences in order to transform the punitive mind. However, the availability of alternatives does not guarantee transformation, nor does a pure logical reasoning of the alternatives make true transformation to happen. Transformation was discovered to happen in those moments, either in narrative critical reflection or in action, when the mind sees those stories of others or themselves that were once familiar but can be realized, interpreted, retold, or recreated if using a new set of assumptions and perspectives. The effects of the legal ban were mixed. It contributed to the decline of the most well-recognized form of corporal punishment--hitting students by sticks--and offered teachers who disbelieve corporal punishment, previously questioned and crowed out by their colleagues who hit, a strong backup to justify their opposition to sticks. And the ban created opportunities for teacher to learn alternatives. Nevertheless, because the wrongdoing-punishment disciplinary framework still dominates school campuses, the ban also led to the increase or creation of new forms of coercive and humiliating measures that could not be constrained by this legal ban.

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Date Created
  • 2013