Matching Items (37)

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The Syrian Refugee Crisis at Home

Description

The goal of this thesis project is to provide insight into the lives of Syrian refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants who have left Syria for the United States within the last 6 years, after the start of the conflict there.

The goal of this thesis project is to provide insight into the lives of Syrian refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants who have left Syria for the United States within the last 6 years, after the start of the conflict there. I have interviewed individuals who come from different regions of Syria, are members of different religious groups, and who have different opinions in regard to the conflict in Syria. One of the questions that I was most curious to ask and have answered was why America was selected as the final destination for their immigration. Along with their backstories from their time in Syria up until their arrival in the United States, I did research into the immigrants' acclimation process, and whether they feel that private organizations or that our government have helped them in that regard. I also collected data to see what the average amount of time to find a job and become self-sufficient in the United States is for these persons and their families. Although most educated Syrians know French, English, and Arabic, I was proven right in my hypothesis that many refugees have come to the United States knowing little, if any, English. Research was done into the programs that are offered to these people and their personal efforts to learn English were also documented. The primary purpose of this thesis was to find the economic and social effects of Syrian immigrants in the state of Arizona, and hopefully, on a larger scale. It was very challenging to get exact numbers on the amount of refugees and impossible to get specific details in regard to their economic impact on the economy. In order to get an approximation, I read David Card's research into the Mariel Boatlift, which documented the economic effects of Cuban immigrants on the Miami labor market, and Semih Tumen's work, titled, "The Economic Impact of Syrian Refugees on Host Countries: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Turkey" which provides research-based analysis of the specific effects of Syrian refugees on the economy of Turkey. Conclusions for both the economic and social impact of Syrian refugees in the state of Arizona were made. Due to the current low numbers of Syrian refugees living in Arizona and the mentality that many of them possess, there is a net neutral economic impact. In regard to social impact, I was surprised to learn that the acclimation process for Syrian immigrants is relatively rapid, particularly when compared to other immigrant and refugee populations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Differential Refugee Assimilation

Description

Do certain refugee groups better adapt and assimilate into society in Arizona? If this is the case, which factors contribute to this better rate of assimilation and what can other groups do to better assimilate into American society? Examining data

Do certain refugee groups better adapt and assimilate into society in Arizona? If this is the case, which factors contribute to this better rate of assimilation and what can other groups do to better assimilate into American society? Examining data from the Department of Economic Security and the Office of Refugee Resettlement, this study examined trends in refugee resettlement in Arizona. Specifically, trends involving socialization, employment, and education were examined. In addition to analyzing governmental data, this study involved the surveying of local refugees at random in order to gather data regarding the relationship between refugees' home countries and assimilation rates. This study finds evidence that there is indeed a correlation between refugees' geographical origin and their overall rate of assimilation. In order to determine this relationship, survey responses involving a variety of aspects of life in America were quantified. Specifically, this study showed that refugees from Latin America and the Middle East tend to assimilate better than those from Africa and other regions.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Welcome to Phoenix: A Coloring Guidebook for Refugee Families

Description

For my thesis, I made a coloring book that acts as a guide for refugee children and their parents of the city of Phoenix as well as new life in the United States. The book works to tackle the difficulty

For my thesis, I made a coloring book that acts as a guide for refugee children and their parents of the city of Phoenix as well as new life in the United States. The book works to tackle the difficulty of transitioning into a new country as well as encourage a dialog between refugee children and their parents surrounding learning and education. I formatted the book into two sections. The front half of the book is targeted towards the children. It is full of coloring pages depicting daily life in Phoenix as well as many fun things that our city has to offer. There are also activity pages scattered in that prompt the children to complete them with their parents and read together. This is aimed to help children succeed in a new learning environment and school system as well as bring the latter half of the book into the parents’ attention. The second half of the book is tailored for the parents as it is a full directory of resources for both refugees and Phoenix residents alike. It includes resources such as free language and literacy classes, employment services, refugee clinics, international food markets, public safety, public transportation, and more. While there are so many different wonderful organizations out there for refugees, it can be overwhelming to navigate our complicated systems rendering these resources difficult to find. With this book, I have compiled these resources into a format that is fun, easily read and translated, and accessible to refugees of all ages.

Link to E-book: https://read.bookcreator.com/B34KYvw00jNsXE7pfoC6lGDtTDC3/p_qX4KXxSte2O…

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Vietnamese Wartime Immigrant Culture Carried Through Generations and Diaspora

Description

A look at how the Vietnam War influenced immigrant and first-generation children's perception of culture. This thesis focuses on Vietnamese-American immigration as a whole, and on subjects on the American west coast. Interviews were conducted with eleven subjects to examine

A look at how the Vietnam War influenced immigrant and first-generation children's perception of culture. This thesis focuses on Vietnamese-American immigration as a whole, and on subjects on the American west coast. Interviews were conducted with eleven subjects to examine the most profound influences on culture and how native culture is passed on through the generations. Focuses include cultural identity, cultural inheritance, prominent native and adoptive cultural values, and culture as affected by adversity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Overlapping Narrative of Muslim Refugees and (Undocumented) Immigrants

Description

Muslim refugees and Muslim immigrants, and undocumented immigrants have been a prominent part of American culture and have been woven into the history of the United States. Both group's presence in the United States has elicited rhetoric from U.S citizens

Muslim refugees and Muslim immigrants, and undocumented immigrants have been a prominent part of American culture and have been woven into the history of the United States. Both group's presence in the United States has elicited rhetoric from U.S citizens and U.S public officials. One may infer that the narrative of Muslim refugees and Muslim immigrants overlaps the narrative of undocumented immigrants living in the United States. Both Muslim refugees and immigrants as well as unauthorized immigrants, are criminalized in the United States, or are associated to crime by default of their faith and or their legal status. The association that Muslim refugees and Muslim immigrants, and undocumented immigrants have with crime, based on their rhetoric, has elicited a policy from the United States government as well. The United States government has responded to a presumed threat that both groups pose to U.S. citizens and the nation by means of aggressive legislation, both local and federal. In this research paper, past and present discourse on Muslim refugees and Muslim immigrants and undocumented immigrants was analyzed to determine each of the group's narrative; the mainstream media, newspapers and photographic images, was also considered to determine the narrative of both groups. Based on the discourse on Muslim refugees and Muslim immigrants and on undocumented immigrants, the media portrayal of both groups, and on the change of public policy one may assert that the narratives of both groups overlaps; as both Muslim refugees and immigrants and unauthorized immigrants are seen as a possible threat to the American people.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

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We Are Resilient Arizona

Description

This creative project is a collection of profiles focused on Arizona nonprofits and refugees. The profiles share stories of refugees, volunteers, employees and others involved in the community serving refugees. Nonprofits are a vital resource for refugee resettlement. These organizations

This creative project is a collection of profiles focused on Arizona nonprofits and refugees. The profiles share stories of refugees, volunteers, employees and others involved in the community serving refugees. Nonprofits are a vital resource for refugee resettlement. These organizations offer services to support refugees as they transition into new communities. Some services include: housing, English language learning, cultural orientation, job placement, medical treatment, education, and farming. Each of these programs support resiliency for refugees and for the communities in which they live. We Are Resilient was created first, to show the important role nonprofits have in serving refugees. Second, to connect people to a few of the stories and experiences within the Arizona refugee community. And third, to build understanding of the strength refugees bring to communities of Arizona and by extension the country. Visit weareresilientaz.com to learn more.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2017-05

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An Approach to Assessing PTSD in Refugee Children

Description

Post-traumatic stress disorder is prevalent in refugees. The population of refugees in the United States is continuing to increase, of which the majority of the incoming refugees are children. A more comprehensive approach is needed to assess children for PTSD.

Post-traumatic stress disorder is prevalent in refugees. The population of refugees in the United States is continuing to increase, of which the majority of the incoming refugees are children. A more comprehensive approach is needed to assess children for PTSD. This creative project involved reviewing existing literature on refugees in the United States, child refugees, Erik Erikson's stages of psychosocial development, and available and applicable PTSD assessment tools. I developed a reference chart that compared the available assessment tools. I recognized that a PTSD assessment tool for refugee children does not exist. In response, I created an approach to assessing PTSD in refugee children ages 5-12. In creating this toolkit, I determined who is appropriate for administering the assessment, discovered how to create trust between the clinician and the child, created the assessment tool, including implementation instructions, and then provided directions on scoring and referrals. The tool itself is called the Child Refugee PTSD Assessment Tool (CRPAT-12). The creation of the CRPAT-12 will hopefully be disseminated and will encourage refugee resettlement organizations to assess children for PTSD upon intake. Early identification of symptoms of distress will help the child receive the appropriate treatment and will help prevent more extreme mental health complications.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

Phoenix as Refuge: A Photographic Exploration of Refugees Within the City

Description

"Phoenix as Refuge: A Photographic Exploration of Refugees Within the City" was a creative thesis project that aimed to bridge the gap between divided communities by creating awareness of refugees within the city of Phoenix. Through an IRB approved research

"Phoenix as Refuge: A Photographic Exploration of Refugees Within the City" was a creative thesis project that aimed to bridge the gap between divided communities by creating awareness of refugees within the city of Phoenix. Through an IRB approved research study, multiple refugee families were interviewed and photographed. The project documented refugees and their stories and then made those interviews accessible to the greater Phoenix community. The purpose was to make the Phoenix community more aware of refugees in the hopes that this awareness would increase community activism and advocacy for this resilient yet vulnerable minority group. This paper explains the refugee resettlement process and addresses the social and economic implications of refugee resettlement and advocacy within an urban area. Many inhabitants of Phoenix are unaware the refugees that live in their city because of the geographic divide between social classes and ethnic groups. In highly urbanized communities, the geographic layout of the city leads to a more individualistic and segregated society. This notion leads to a discussion of Robert Putnam's theory of social capital, which argued that by improving and fostering social connections, one could increase social well-being and even make the economy more efficient. This paper then applies Putnam's ideas to the interaction between refugees and non-refugees, using space as a determining factor in measuring the social capital of the Phoenix community. As evident in the study of Phoenix's geographic divide between social and economic classes, Phoenix, like many urban cities, is not designed in a way that fosters social capital. Therefore, advocacy must go beyond people and into advocacy for a different kind of city and place that sets up refugees, and non-refugees alike, to succeed. In this way, rethinking the city through urban planning becomes integral to making new social networks possible, building social capital, and increasing social welfare in urban spaces.

Contributors

Agent

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Date Created
2017-12

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Voices of the Past, Voice of the Future

Description

Voices of the Past, Voice of the Future is project created by Christopher Silavong. This is a personal story where I delve into my parents' past and a country of which I knew nothing. As a child, I never learned

Voices of the Past, Voice of the Future is project created by Christopher Silavong. This is a personal story where I delve into my parents' past and a country of which I knew nothing. As a child, I never learned about my parents' country, nor did I ask about their childhood and what Laos was like. I'm sure they spoke about their past in passing, but I didn't pay attention or asked further questions. I was young and time seemed forever. And then in 2012, the realization that one day they'll die became real. My father suffered a stroke nine days before my birthday. I wanted to know who my parents were and what brought them to America. My parents' stories will be incomplete. They've lived in America much longer than they'd lived in Laos, and it's difficult for them to remember what happened to them at 10 years old, especially for my father. It also doesn't help that I don't know how to speak Lao. This is a working project, and I'll continue asking them about their lives until I no longer can. But for now, here's what I've pieced together.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Teaching Science to Arizona Refugee Students: Lesson Plans Created for English Language Learners

Description

This project is designed to generate enthusiasm for science among refugee students in hopes of inspiring them to continue learning science as well as to help them with their current understanding of their school science subject matter.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-12