Matching Items (10)

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Adaptive and Interactive Architecture

Description

I devote my thesis to the practice of adaptive architecture and parametric design. The interactive and adaptive design would be my interest and my research thesis will be the process

I devote my thesis to the practice of adaptive architecture and parametric design. The interactive and adaptive design would be my interest and my research thesis will be the process of exploring the architectural potentials of computer-programmed architectural design which interact with human beings. Start with the adaptive architectural theory of Neil Leach and Sou Fujimoto's architectural theory of architecture type, I explore and test the possibilities with current tools. I did reseach on the current study and practice of adaptive and interactive architecture in 20 century. After a series of study and experiment, I decided to make the "mirror" as a portal of inside and outside a building indicating a vague spacial relationship instead of just a normal mechanic mirror. The "mirror" will able to translate the information captured from motion to another "language" presented by movable materials to surrounding people, which provides people space to reflect and interact with each other. And the device would be the prototype of my thesis. The exploration of technology in the field of architecture really attracts me. I enjoy the design process and the final product. I will pay attention to new technologies in the future and try to combine technology, art and architecture together to create new experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

Filtering the Media: Partisan Media Bias in a Divided America

Description

This project explores the impacts of partisan media bias on the American people and government through a book, website, and three-dimensional exhibit. It is meant to make audiences question the

This project explores the impacts of partisan media bias on the American people and government through a book, website, and three-dimensional exhibit. It is meant to make audiences question the validity and reliability of the information around them while encouraging skepticism.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Digital Education Collaborative Thesis

Description

A deep dive on digital education solutions in the current and post-COVID education industry. Specific attention was given Interactive Flat Panel Display solutions in K-12 and higher education classrooms.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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How Collaboration is Operationalized and Successfully Implemented in Language Learning Classrooms.

Description

Education plays a key role throughout many different fields of study. My question has to do with not what we are learning, but how we are learning it, therefore focusing

Education plays a key role throughout many different fields of study. My question has to do with not what we are learning, but how we are learning it, therefore focusing more on the teaching and instructional design aspect of the learning process. Specifically, the goal of my thesis is to theoretically define collaborative learning and develop a framework that demonstrates how collaboration and interactivity can be successfully implemented in a language learning classroom. Language learning is essential in schools because it enables students to be culturally aware. According to the Modern Language Teachers' Association of South Australia, language learning plays a significant role in 21st Century learning. It assists students in being more community engaged as well as culturally diverse. They state that "knowing additional languages and cultures involves connecting, engaging, and interacting with others and negotiating boundaries based on diverse ways of understanding the world." (MLTASA) Collaboration can be very beneficial in the human learning process. According to Webb, students that collaborate with each other engage in challenging conversations and produce joint solutions whereas students that don't collaborate engage in conversation about practical rather than abstract matters (Webb, 2009). The success of collaboration is defined by the content of the dialog, groups won't necessarily engage in beneficial dialogue without help and facilitation by the teacher. It's important for teachers to keep groups on task and monitor their progress throughout the lesson. Through collaborative learning the student is able to take more from the lesson and view each concept from an alternate perspective. With teacher facilitated group discussions, students preform knowledge construction and challenge individual thoughts in order to come up with a joint solution that's takes everyone's point of view into perspective (Nastasi, 1999). Many researchers have concluded that collaborative learning, is a very beneficial learning method when it comes to challenging thoughts and concepts between students. Because each individual has a different thought process and ideas, each student brings a different concept that can be challenged and discussed among the group. Many researchers have previously studied the benefits of collaborative learning as well as the teacher's role in correctly facilitating and implementing it. Webb, highlights the importance of teachers actively pushing students to collaborate and challenge ideas. She states "In classrooms in which teachers pushed students to make explicit the steps in their mental processes (whether students' answers and strategies were correct or incorrect), collaborative groups engaged in frequent explaining and provided explanations that were correct and complete" (Webb, 2009, pg.18). Similarly, researchers such as Rijkje Dekker and Marianne Elshout-Mohr argue that collaboration in classrooms is especially important in terms of the type of work that is assigned. Assignments that require collaboration generally go more in depth and are considered more challenging than those given in individual assignments "Collaborative learning tasks are in general designed as complex, challenging and authentic problems. Such problems motivate students to attempt different strategies and co-construct and justify solutions" (Elshout-Mohr and Dekker, 2000, pg.40). Collaboration in language learning classrooms is beneficial and quite easy to implement (Elshout-Mohr and Dekker, 2000).

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

Interactive Learning of Euclid's Elements

Description

Today, there is a gap between the effectiveness of learning online and learning in person. Online educational videos such as ones found on Youtube mimic more of a lecture style

Today, there is a gap between the effectiveness of learning online and learning in person. Online educational videos such as ones found on Youtube mimic more of a lecture style of learning, which is easy ignore without a teacher nearby to engage the viewer. Furthermore, there is a lack of educational videos on the topic of Euclid’s Elements geometry proofs. This project remedies both accounts by offering a new approach on interactive online learning videos and exercises for the topic of Euclid’s Elements Book One, Propositions One and Two. This is accomplished by combining interactive videos, exercises, questions, and sketchpads into one online worksheet. The interactive videos are made using traditional methods of audio and visual elements, with an emphasis on having more dynamic visuals to engage with the viewer. The exercises are made using a program called Geogebra, and consist in having a question to solve, and diagram the use can manipulate to help solve the question. The questions consist in ensuring the viewer understands the material, as well as potential questions to gauge general understanding before and after using the worksheet. The sketchpads consist in stating the proposition being proved, and giving the user all the tools they need to construct or prove the Euclidean proposition in the online interactive environment offered by Geogebra. All of these components are then ordered into the worksheet to make an interactive online learning experience for the viewer. This way the viewer may both watch and actively use the material being presented to promote learning through engagement in a teacher-less environment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

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Merging Technology and Creative Writing to Improve Literacy and Foster Inclusive Community Development

Description

At Arizona State University the retention rate is a problem. On one hand, students come to take advantage of the great opportunities a large school facilitates, such as internship opportunities

At Arizona State University the retention rate is a problem. On one hand, students come to take advantage of the great opportunities a large school facilitates, such as internship opportunities and a variety of courses. On the other hand, being at such a large school can leave students overwhelmed and lost; students do not view ASU as "their school." This thesis explores a unique and very possible solution to this problem. Through a creative writing story merged with an online website and geo-cache treasure hunt, this thesis presents the history of ASU in an interactive and engaging way in order to foster the development of an inclusive community centered on school pride. Furthermore, through this piece of interactive literature, the first of its kind, researchers will be able to measure the direct impact of this story both qualitatively, based on community response, and quantitatively, based on the names recorded in the geo cache boxes.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

Applied interdisciplinary concepts for designing visual media within interactive neurorehabilitation systems

Description

As the application of interactive media systems expands to address broader problems in health, education and creative practice, they fall within a higher dimensional space for which it is inherently

As the application of interactive media systems expands to address broader problems in health, education and creative practice, they fall within a higher dimensional space for which it is inherently more complex to design. In response to this need an emerging area of interactive system design, referred to as experiential media systems, applies hybrid knowledge synthesized across multiple disciplines to address challenges relevant to daily experience. Interactive neurorehabilitation (INR) aims to enhance functional movement therapy by integrating detailed motion capture with interactive feedback in a manner that facilitates engagement and sensorimotor learning for those who have suffered neurologic injury. While INR shows great promise to advance the current state of therapies, a cohesive media design methodology for INR is missing due to the present lack of substantial evidence within the field. Using an experiential media based approach to draw knowledge from external disciplines, this dissertation proposes a compositional framework for authoring visual media for INR systems across contexts and applications within upper extremity stroke rehabilitation. The compositional framework is applied across systems for supervised training, unsupervised training, and assisted reflection, which reflect the collective work of the Adaptive Mixed Reality Rehabilitation (AMRR) Team at Arizona State University, of which the author is a member. Formal structures and a methodology for applying them are described in detail for the visual media environments designed by the author. Data collected from studies conducted by the AMRR team to evaluate these systems in both supervised and unsupervised training contexts is also discussed in terms of the extent to which the application of the compositional framework is supported and which aspects require further investigation. The potential broader implications of the proposed compositional framework and methodology are the dissemination of interdisciplinary information to accelerate the informed development of INR applications and to demonstrate the potential benefit of generalizing integrative approaches, merging arts and science based knowledge, for other complex problems related to embodied learning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Embodied flow in experiential media systems: a study of the dancer's lived experience in a responsive audio system

Description

During the design of interactive dance performances, dancers generate a strong relationship to the responsive media after they are given information about how to use the system. This case study

During the design of interactive dance performances, dancers generate a strong relationship to the responsive media after they are given information about how to use the system. This case study observes a dancer's experience of improvising in a responsive audio system (RAS). A triangulated analysis and conclusion is formed from Laban Movement Analysis in conjunction with post-experience discussions relating to Optimal Flow. This study examines whether or not providing information about how an audio system responds to movement affects a dancers ability to achieve a heightened state of Embodied Flow while improvising in a RAS.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Interactive-constructive-active-passive: the relative effectiveness of differentiated activities on students' learning

Description

From the instructional perspective, the scope of "active learning" in the literature is very broad and includes all sorts of classroom activities that engage students with the learning experience. However,

From the instructional perspective, the scope of "active learning" in the literature is very broad and includes all sorts of classroom activities that engage students with the learning experience. However, classifying all classroom activities as a mode of "active learning" simply ignores the unique cognitive processes associated with the type of activity. The lack of an extensive framework and taxonomy regarding the relative effectiveness of these "active" activities makes it difficult to compare and contrast the value of conditions in different studies in terms of student learning. Recently, Chi (2009) proposed a framework of differentiated overt learning activities (DOLA) as active, constructive, and interactive based on their underlying cognitive principles and their effectiveness on students' learning outcomes. The motivating question behind this framework is whether some types of engagement affect learning outcomes more than the others. This work evaluated the effectiveness and applicability of the DOLA framework to learning activities for STEM classes. After classification of overt learning activities as being active, constructive or interactive, I then tested the ICAP hypothesis, which states that student learning is more effective in interactive activities than constructive activities, which are more effective than active activities, which are more effective than passive activities. I conducted two studies (Study 1 and Study 2) to determine how and to what degree differentiated activities affected students' learning outcomes. For both studies, I measured students' knowledge of materials science and engineering concepts. Results for Study 1 showed that students scored higher on all post-class quiz questions after participating in interactive and constructive activities than after the active activities. However, student scores on more difficult, inference questions suggested that interactive activities provided significantly deeper learning than either constructive or active activities. Results for Study 2 showed that students' learning, in terms of gain scores, increased systematically from passive to active to constructive to interactive, as predicted by ICAP. All the increases, from condition to condition, were significant. Verbal analysis of the students' dialogue in interactive condition indicated a strong correlation between the co-construction of knowledge and learning gains. When the statements and responses of each student build upon those of the other, both students benefit from the collaboration. Also, the linear combination of discourse moves was significantly related to the adjusted gain scores with a very high correlation coefficient. Specifically, the elaborate type discourse moves were positively correlated with learning outcomes; whereas the accept type moves were negatively correlated with learning outcomes. Analyses of authentic activities in a STEM classroom showed that they fit within the taxonomy of the DOLA framework. The results of the two studies provided evidence to support the predictions of the ICAP hypothesis.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

CYOA an examination of the possibilities of dynamic musical objects as a new format for music distribution

Description

CYOA is a prototype of an iPhone application that produces a single, generative, musical work. This document details some of the thoughts and practices that informed its design, and specifically

CYOA is a prototype of an iPhone application that produces a single, generative, musical work. This document details some of the thoughts and practices that informed its design, and specifically addresses the overlap between application structure and musical form. The concept of composed instruments is introduced and briefly discussed, some features of video game design that relate to this project are considered, and some specifics of hardware implementation are addressed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013