Matching Items (34)

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Jumping in with Both Feet: How Involvement and Use of Resources Relates to College Freshmen's Satisfaction and GPA

Description

Researchers suggests that college students' involvement and use of resources on campus are important for success, in the form of satisfaction and GPA, in the first year. College officials invest

Researchers suggests that college students' involvement and use of resources on campus are important for success, in the form of satisfaction and GPA, in the first year. College officials invest substantial resources in activities to encourage freshmen students to become involved in campus activities and utilize resources that promote successful outcomes, yet we do not know which activities best relate to success. Using a self-report survey, we sought to corroborate previous research that has shown that overall levels of involvement and use of resources relate to satisfaction/GPA. Furthermore, we disentangled which individual types of involvement and use of resources are most highly correlated with satisfaction and GPA. And finally, we identified the barriers and benefits to involvement and resource use, according to the students themselves. We found evidence that higher levels of involvement were related to satisfaction and attending faculty office hours appears to be particularly important, given a significant relation to both satisfaction and GPA. Implications for program promotion and resource allocation are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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The Struggles of the Community Assistant Position at Universities: A Managerial Approach

Description

The Community Assistant position at Arizona State University is dealing with an issue of poor year-to-year retention. Currently, a large number of Community Assistants who could return for another year

The Community Assistant position at Arizona State University is dealing with an issue of poor year-to-year retention. Currently, a large number of Community Assistants who could return for another year are choosing not to, which is further exacerbated by the fact that graduating Community Assistants cannot stay even if they wanted to because the position must be held by active students. Through research, interviews, and testimony, this paper constructs what the Community Assistant role entails and the priorities that the role instills in current Community Assistants at ASU. It then seeks to answer the question of why low levels of year-to-year retention matter and why so many are choosing to move to different positions after their first year has ended. By building from the information provided by current Community Assistants and various management theories from a variety of sources, this paper offers actionable recommendations for Arizona State University Housing to increase retention and motivation within the Community Assistant position.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Laws of Attraction: How Companies Can Better Attract and Retain Millennial Workers

Description

The purpose of this thesis is to examine how companies can most effectively attract and retain millennial workers. Millennials are the future of the corporate world, and their retention in

The purpose of this thesis is to examine how companies can most effectively attract and retain millennial workers. Millennials are the future of the corporate world, and their retention in the workforce is important. Research for this study was gathered through the use of two surveys administered to Arizona State University students and corporate recruiters. The student survey focuses on what students' value in future employers, while also concentrating on challenges and opportunities job seekers presently face. The corporate survey asks questions related to the efforts used to attract and retain future employees, and the challenges and opportunities of the millennial worker. The findings reveal the millennial generation and the employers of today find alignment and disagreement within the topics of job dedication, culture, generational perceptions, and perceptions of the millennial. This study has a number of practical implications for employers seeking to understand how to integrate millennial workers into their corporate environment. Students will also find practical implications from this study, as they can better understand how to successfully get hired and be a part of a corporate environment. Recommendations for change on the students and employers respective behalf are based on survey findings and secondary source research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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A Preliminary Inquiry into Latina/o Students' ""Sense of Belonging"" at Arizona State University's West Campus

Description

The purpose of this research is to explore Latina/o students' involvement at Arizona State University West and how it affects their sense of belonging, and thereby, their retention. I operationalize

The purpose of this research is to explore Latina/o students' involvement at Arizona State University West and how it affects their sense of belonging, and thereby, their retention. I operationalize a "sense of belonging" as being able to express and feel comfortable with one's ethnic identity in the context of a higher education institution (Hurtado, 1997). I operationalize student involvement by the extent to which an individual student is devoted to their academic experience, invests time studying on campus, participates in student organizations, and interacts with faculty and their peers (Astin, 1984). I draw from Astin's theory of student involvement and Hurtado's sense of belonging as a base for this inquiry because they are critical components to understanding retention among the Latino/a community at Arizona State University West.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Are High Potential Programs Leaving Top Talent Behind?

Description

The purpose of this paper is to understand how companies are finding high potential employees and if they are leaving top talent behind in their approach. Eugene Burke stated in

The purpose of this paper is to understand how companies are finding high potential employees and if they are leaving top talent behind in their approach. Eugene Burke stated in 2014 that 55% of employees that are labeled as a High Potential Employee will turn over and move companies. Burke (2014) also states that the average high potential employee tenure is five years. The Corporate Leadership Council says that on average, 27% of a company's development budget is spent on its high potential program (CEB 2017). For a midsize company, the high potential development budget is almost a million dollars for only a handful of employees, only to see half of the investment walking out the door to another company . Furthermore, the Corporate Leadership Council said that a study done in 2005 revealed that 50% of high potential employees had significant problems within their job (Kotlyar and Karkowsky 2014). Are time and resources are being given to the wrong employees and the right employees are being overlooked? This paper exams how companies traditionally select high potential employees and where companies are potentially omitting employees who would be better suited for the program. This paper proposes that how a company discovers their top talent will correlate to the number of turnovers or struggles that a high potential employee has on their job. Future research direction and practical considerations are also presented in this paper.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Information Comprehension and Retention in the Digital Age

Description

This study looked at college-age students' ability to comprehend and retain information learned from news articles depending on what platform they read from. Fifteen participants read three local New York

This study looked at college-age students' ability to comprehend and retain information learned from news articles depending on what platform they read from. Fifteen participants read three local New York Times articles on each of the platforms provided: iPad, laptop, and paper. They took one test immediately after to test comprehension and another two weeks later to test their retention. Participants were also asked if they found the articles interesting, enjoyable, clear, etc. Results showed that participants' views on each format had little, if any, affect on their number of correct responses. The most consistent results on the participants' perceptions of the formats came from the laptop and paper, whereas the iPad received a bimodal pattern of responses. Participants were also asked to share their news habits while taking the test by selecting how frequently they gain news from various sources such as social media or television. These habits also seemed to have very little effect on their scores.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Analysis of Learning Retention throughout Aging

Description

In this paper, it is determined that learning retention decreases with age and there is a linear rate of decrease. In this study, four male Long-Evans Rats were used. The

In this paper, it is determined that learning retention decreases with age and there is a linear rate of decrease. In this study, four male Long-Evans Rats were used. The rats were each trained in 4 different tasks throughout their lifetime, using a food reward as motivation to work. Rats were said to have learned a task at the age when they received the highest accuracy during a task. A regression of learning retention was created for the set of studied rats: Learning Retention = 112.9 \u2014 0.085919 x (Age at End of Task), indicating that learning retention decreases at a linear rate, although rats have different rates of decrease of learning retention. The presence of behavioral training was determined not to have a positive impact on this rate. In behavioral studies, there were statistically significant differences between timid/outgoing and large ball ability between W12 and Z12. Rat W12 had overall better learning retention and also was more compliant, did not resist being picked up and traveled more frequently at high speeds (in the large ball) than Z12. Further potential studies include implanting an electrode into the frontal cortex in order to compare neuro feedback with learning retention, and using human subjects to find the rate of decrease in learning retention. The implication of this study, if also true for human subjects, is that older persons may need enhanced training or additional refresher training in order to retain information that is learned at a later age.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Increasing Return on Investment: How to Get the Most Out of Your Company's Intern Program

Description

Purpose: This thesis studies students' motivations for accepting internships, and how companies can better their internship programs to retain interns for full-time employment. The purpose of this thesis is to

Purpose: This thesis studies students' motivations for accepting internships, and how companies can better their internship programs to retain interns for full-time employment. The purpose of this thesis is to produce ways for companies to increase the return on investment of their internship programs by increasing their conversion rates of interns to full-time employees. Methodology: In addition to research of existing literature, a survey was given to undergraduate students at Arizona State University to determine students' motivations for accepting internships, interest level in working for the company full-time before starting their internship and upon completion of their internship, what factors are important when seeking an internship versus a full-time job, what different companies offer in their internship programs, and how companies stay in contact with interns following their internship. Findings: Through my research I found that upper and lower division students have different motivations for completing internships, and that upper division students have more of a motivation for working full-time for the company they intern for. I also found that students' interest in the company will shift throughout the course of their internship, but those students that are satisfied with their internship will be more likely to want to work full-time with that employer. Students also found different factors important when seeking internships versus full-time jobs; students looking for internships are most interested in work that they enjoy, industry, and pay, while students searching for a full-time job find pay, work, that you enjoy, and location most important. I also found that students would be most satisfied with those internships in which the program centers on engagement, meaningful work, and feeling a part of the team. Finally, students who accept return offers from the company they intern for receive minimal communication from the company after they receive their offer. This may be the reason so many former interns continue to seek other job opportunities following the acceptance of their return offer.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

Business Is Personal: An Analysis and Audit of the W.P. Carey School of Business' Current Efforts towards Student Engagement, Retention, and Promotion to Graduation

Description

This project seeks to investigate the ways in which the W.P. Carey School of Business, at Arizona State University, can improve student retention and engagement efforts. The analysis is being

This project seeks to investigate the ways in which the W.P. Carey School of Business, at Arizona State University, can improve student retention and engagement efforts. The analysis is being completed through an audit of the business school's current efforts towards student engagement, an examination of the internal and external environments of business schools across the nation, and a review of scholarly data/research on student retention risk factors and methods for improving engagement. The study highlights what exactly contributes to the success of the W.P. Carey School of Business, concluding with recommendations for how its engagement and retention efforts can be further improved to continue to serve students at a nationally ranked level.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Sell Them Mothafuckin' Hoes a Dream"" \u2014 A Look Into the Business Structure Behind Recruitment and Retention in Sex Trafficking

Description

Sex trafficking in the United States is an enormous illegal underground business economy that involves the sexual exploitation of many persons. Due to the large nature of the sex

Sex trafficking in the United States is an enormous illegal underground business economy that involves the sexual exploitation of many persons. Due to the large nature of the sex trafficking business and the many different types of sex trafficking, it is helpful for social workers, government agencies, and activists to understand the intricacies of the various types of sex trafficking. This research focused on determining the human resources business structures behind pimp businesses that relied on mental coercion of the victim. The data source used, Pimpfeet.com—an online pimp authored blog—provided data from actual pimps on their business practices that were analyzed to determine trends in recruitment and retention. These trends were compared to human resource management theories from business literature to determine to what extent, or if at all, a pimp’s business recruited and retained workers in a way that was similar to how a legal business would, according to human resources strategies. The data extracted from Pimpfeet.com and used in this study consisted of 69 pimp quotes that were put into three recruitment categories and five retention categories based on human resource management literature in order to see which categories were used for recruitment and retention by pimps. This study found that pimp recruitment and retention followed, to some extent, the same models described in the human resource management literature, with slight modifications. This study showed that job embeddedness theory (Holtom, Mitchel and Lee, 2009) was able to explain much of why sex trafficking victims are retained so well by pimps since they are so embedded in the prostitution lifestyle. These findings show the different business techniques that pimps use for recruitment and retention of sex workers and are useful for understanding how a social worker, government entity or an activist can combat these forces to help remove victims from a pimp’s control, or keep victims from getting recruited in the first place. Further areas of research related to this topic were suggested.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05