Matching Items (11)

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The State of Latino Arizona

Description

The trajectory of Hispanic culture and society in the American Southwest began long before Arizona achieved territorial status, and its impact remains a defining element shaping the future of our

The trajectory of Hispanic culture and society in the American Southwest began long before Arizona achieved territorial status, and its impact remains a defining element shaping the future of our expansive binational region. Historical perspective provides a framework for an assessment of contemporary successes, challenges, and aspirations, as well as perceptions and projections regarding the potential of the decades to come. The report offers both objective indicators and nuanced perspective regarding the critical issues that require our collective attention, including education, healthcare, justice and equality, job creation, economic development, quality of life and quality of place, and opportunity for enterprise and social advancement.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2009

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Am I a Feminist?: Discussing Self-Identity of Latina College Women Through the Lens of Feminist Theory

Description

This thesis project had three key components. First, we performed an extensive literature review of different types of feminist theories to better understand the scope of their definitions. We also

This thesis project had three key components. First, we performed an extensive literature review of different types of feminist theories to better understand the scope of their definitions. We also reviewed several articles that examined how women, especially Latinas, seek to understand and negotiate their identity as feminists. Second, we conducted qualitative interviews with Latina college women in which they shared their college experiences, their thoughts on feminism, and how they believe the cultural values they were brought up with play a role in both. Finally, we developed a 12-minute documentary film containing excerpts from participants’ interviews that reflected a number of core themes. We invited participants to view the documentary and contribute to a post-film conversation with interested faculty members and students. The interactive post-film conversation served as a reflection and expansion of the themes in the film and challenged those that participated to explore avenues of resolution through family and communication.
The motivation for this project came from a place of reflection for what it means to be a feminist and Latina and how to navigate the values of both without compromising one over the other. After personally contemplating the meanings and process without coming to a concrete understanding, we were prompted to branch out and engage other Latina college students in a conversation about what it means for them, what unique challenges they may be facing, and how they may be seeking to answer questions surrounding their identity.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

The Story of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz

Description

The story of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz is one of a woman who defied the odds of her time. Sor Juana was a nun born in the 1600's

The story of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz is one of a woman who defied the odds of her time. Sor Juana was a nun born in the 1600's in Mexico. From an early start, she had an endless passion for knowledge and always strove to learn as much as she could. She went on to become a nun at the Convent of Santa Paula and used her intellect to advocate for women's rights. Though met with opposition, she wrote many poems, letters, and even plays which included her strong push for women's equality. However, the name Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz is almost never mentioned in popular feminist discourse, despite Sor Juana being credited as one of the first feminist authors. This paper works to not only tell the story of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz in detail, but also works to answer the question, "Why do people not know about Sor Juana". By diving into the origins of the Feminist movement in the United States, the dark underbelly of Feminism is uncovered. Primarily, the topic of how racism in feminism has plague the civil rights movement, what damage has been done to people of color because of feminism's history, and how does that pertain to modern day feminism and Sor Juana. By telling her story through both written and visual aids, the voice of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz is no longer silenced but free to tell her tale and move a generation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Cosas Llevadas: Inside Life Story Narratives from Latina Mothers of Mexican Descent with High Academic Accomplishment

Description

The field of developmental psychology often underrepresents Latinx individuals within their corpus of published scholarship. In the area of lifespan identity development this is particularly evident from the scarcity of

The field of developmental psychology often underrepresents Latinx individuals within their corpus of published scholarship. In the area of lifespan identity development this is particularly evident from the scarcity of Latinx life story narratives. In addition, Latinx family parenting styles is an underdeveloped area of scholarship. At the same time, a robust literature base demonstrates that for youth from non-dominant culture families, ethnic racial identity increases measures of adaptive well-being and academic achievement. Because academic achievement for Latinx students does not proportionately reach levels of educational success as compared to whites, research investigating foundations of ethnic racial identity within Latinx families is warranted. This investigation extends parenting style literature within the field of developmental psychology by exploring inter-generational practices of Latinx families. Participants within this study include mothers of Mexican descent who have earned at least one Master's degree, a level of high academic achievement attained by only 10 percent of adults within the U.S. Each Latina mother, ranging in age from 36 to 63 years, participated in two or more semi-structured interviews. Protocols were based on McAdams's life story interview; McAdams's life story narrative analysis, based upon Erikson's lifespan theory of identity development, provided a model of analysis. In addition, transcripts of participant interviews, totaling more than twelve hours, were analyzed according to themes of parenting styles and family socialization practices. Familial ethnic socialization was embedded within routines and practices of mothers' families of orientation. Mothers employed a concerted cultivation parenting style within their families of procreation. In alignment with McAdams's framework, mothers narrated life stories in a redemptive manner. In other words, a negative life event was conveyed as having a positive outcome. Implications from my study inform scholars and can offer usable information for parent and teacher education by means of contextualized family activities and parental practices gleaned from participants' life story narratives.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Students as experts: using photo-elicitation facilitation groups to understand the resiliency of Latina low-income first-generation college students

Description

ABSTRACT

Historically, first-generation college students (FGCS), students whose parents have not attended college nor earned a degree, are more likely to have lower college retention rates and are less likely to

ABSTRACT

Historically, first-generation college students (FGCS), students whose parents have not attended college nor earned a degree, are more likely to have lower college retention rates and are less likely to complete their academic programs in a timely manner. Despite this, there are many FGCS who do succeed and it is imperative to learn what fuels their success. The theoretical perspectives that framed this study included: hidden curricula, resiliency theory and community cultural wealth. Drawing from these perspectives, this qualitative research study consisted of a 10-week photo-elicitation facilitation and reflection group in which participants identified aspects of the hidden curricula encountered in the university that were challenging in their educational journeys and guided them in identifying the sources of strength (i.e. protective factors) that they channeled to overcome those challenges. The participants for this study were selected using a stratified purposeful sampling approach. The participants identified as Latina, low-income FGCS who were on good academic standing and majored in two of the largest academic units at Arizona State University's Tempe campus- the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Fulton College of Engineering. This study used participants’ testimonios (critical, reflexive narratives), photo-elicitation images, student journal responses, focus group dialogue and Facebook group posts to better understand the resiliency of Latina, low-income FGCS at ASU. Using grounded theory analysis, this study revealed the following,

Latina, low-income FGCS:

- Primarily define and develop their academic resiliency outside of the classroom and use social capital connections with peers and aspirational capital connections to their future to be successful inside the classroom.

- Are heavily driven to succeed in the university setting because of their family's support and because they view their presence in college as a unique opportunity that they are grateful for.

- Operationalize their academic resiliency through a combination of hard work and sacrifice, as well as an active implementation of resilience tactics.

- Are motivated to pass on their resiliency capital to other students like them and perceive their pursuit of a college education as a transformative action for themselves, their families and their communities.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Preferred physical activity program characteristics by a Latina community

Description

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate physical activity (PA) program characteristics preferred by low-income childbearing age Latinas and the relationship with the participants’ personal characteristics, cultural values, and

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate physical activity (PA) program characteristics preferred by low-income childbearing age Latinas and the relationship with the participants’ personal characteristics, cultural values, and acculturation. This was an exploratory study guided by the Preferences and Health Behavior Model (PaHBM), developed by this investigator. Recruitment occurred at three sites; two sites were located in Phoenix, AZ and one site was located in Houston, TX. Non pregnant Latinas between 18 to 35 years old were included (N=275). Latinas were excluded if they were pregnant, incarcerated, physically or mentally disabled, or had chronic diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease). Quantitative data were collected using the Predictors and Preferences of Physical Activity Research Intervention Participation in an Underserved Latina Community Questionnaire, developed by this author, along with the Brief Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans, and the Mexican American Cultural Values Scale. The hypotheses were tested utilizing Chi-square, Pearson correlation and logistic regression. Annual family income, parity, country of origin, BMI and acculturation were the personal characteristics significantly associated with preferred PA program by this group of Latinas. Latino women were heterogeneous in their preferences. In general, sixty percent endorsed dancing as the type of activity preferred, 20% preferred PA education and 20% preferred walking. Major differences were found between the types of activity the Latino women were currently participating in compared to their preferred type of activity. Of the 124 who reported to be walking/jogging, almost half (49) preferred dancing, 22 preferred PA education and only 12 preferred walking. The study findings add to the existing knowledge by looking at factors that should be considered when developing PA interventions as well as when prescribing or recommending PA to this population. These results demonstrate the need to identify the preferred PA program characteristics of Latinas prior to developing interventions. Failure to know the patient’s preferred PA program characteristics may result in prescribing or recommending an undesired activity and decrease participation in PA interventions.

RESUMEN

El propósito de este estudio fue identificar las características preferidas en un programa de actividad física por una comunidad de mujeres Latinas de bajos recursos económicos y en edad fértil, así como la relación de esas características con sus propias características personales, sus valores culturales y su adaptación a la comunidad Anglosajona. Este fue un estudio exploratorio guiado por el “Modelo Preferencias y Comportamiento Saludables” (PaHBM), por sus siglas en Ingles, desarrollado por esta investigadora. El reclutamiento de las Latinas ocurrió en tres sedes: Una en Houston, TX y dos en Phoenix, AZ. Las mujeres Latinas fueron incluidas si tenían entre 18 y 35 años de edad. Se excluyeron mujeres que estaban embarazadas, estuvieran encarceladas, físicamente o mentalmente incapacitadas o que sufrieran alguna enfermedad crónica. Los datos cuantitativos fueron recolectados a través de una encuesta llamada “Predictores y preferencias de participación en un programa investigativo de actividad física”, desarrollada por la autora de este estudio, además utilizando la escala breve de aculturación para Mejicanos Americanos y la escala de valores culturales en Mejicanos Americanos. Las hipótesis fueron probadas utilizando el Chi-cuadrado, la correlación de Pearson, y la regresión lógica. Las características personales más asociadas con las características del programa preferido fueron el salario anual de la familia, el número de hijos, el país de origen, y el índice de masa corporal. En general, 60% prefirieron bailar, 20% clases de actividad física y 20% caminar. Mayores diferencias se encontraron en el tipo de actividad en las que las mujeres Latinas estaban participando, comparado con lo que ellas preferían. De 124 participantes que estaban caminando o trotando, 49 Latinas (39%) preferían bailar, 22 Latinas (17%) preferían clases de actividad física y solo 12 Latinas (10%) prefirieron caminar. Estos resultados demuestran la necesidad de identificar las características del programa de actividad física antes de crear dicho programa. Estos resultados son una adición a los conocimientos existentes, en los que se identificaron factores que deben ser considerados cuando se planea un programa así como cuando se prescribe o se recomienda actividad física a esta población. Sera un fracaso no conocer las preferencias de una paciente para mantenerse físicamente activa porque puede resultar en la prescripción o recomendación de actividades que la paciente no desea y esto se traducirá en reducción de la participación en programas de actividad física.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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El charco, el Diablo y la Tutti Frutti: hacia un imaginario eulatino transnacional en Frances Negrón-Muntaner, Lourdes Portillo y Helena Solberg

Description

This dissertation is a comparative study of three contemporary women filmmakers: Puerto Rican Frances Negrón-Muntaner, Chicana director Lourdes Portillo, and Brazilian director Helena Solberg. Informed by transnational theory, politics of

This dissertation is a comparative study of three contemporary women filmmakers: Puerto Rican Frances Negrón-Muntaner, Chicana director Lourdes Portillo, and Brazilian director Helena Solberg. Informed by transnational theory, politics of location, feminism on the border, and approaches to documentary filmmaking, the study examines three filmic texts: Brincando el charco: Portrait of a Puerto Rican (1994), The Devil Never Sleeps/El diablo nunca duerme (1994), and Carmen Miranda: Bananas Is My Business (1994). Each film is narrated by a female voice who juxtaposes her personal and transnational identity with history to tell her migration story before and after returning to her country of origin. An objective of the study is to demonstrate how the film directors vis-á-vis their female protagonists, configure a United States Latina transnational imaginary to position their female protagonists and themselves as female directors and as active social agents. Further, the dissertation explores how the filmmakers construct, utilizing the cinematographic apparatus, specific forms of resistance to confront certain oppressive forms. The theoretical framework proposes that transnational documentary filmmaking offers specific contestatory representations and makes possible the opening of parallel spaces in order to allow for a transformation from multiple perspectives. Through the utilization of specific techniques such as archival footage, the three directors focus on historical biographies. Further, they make use of experimental filmmaking and, in particular, the transnational documentary to deconstruct hegemonic discourses. Lastly, transnational cinema is valued as a field for cultural renegotiating and as a result, the documentary filmmakers in this study are able to reconfigure a transnational imaginary and propose an alternative discourse about history, sexuality, family structures, and gender relations. In sum, my dissertation contributes to Chicana/o and U.S. Latina/o, American Literature, and other Ethnic Literatures by focusing on migration, acculturation, and multicultural dialogue.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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The effectiveness of an internet-based career development program: the impact of matching animated agent ethnic appearance

Description

The current study is a follow up to a previous evaluation of Believe It!, an internet-based career development program for adolescent girls. This study attempted to extend the program's effectiveness

The current study is a follow up to a previous evaluation of Believe It!, an internet-based career development program for adolescent girls. This study attempted to extend the program's effectiveness by manipulating animated agent appearance based on literature suggesting that agent appearance has implications for human-computer program interface. Participants included 52 Latinas (ages 11 to 14) randomly assigned to view one of two versions of the revised career program. Each version contained identical content but included animated agents designed to represent different ethnicities. Pre and post-treatment scores for three career belief measures and an occupational stereotype measure were analyzed using a MANCOVA. The results were not significant and further analyses revealed that the results were confounded by complications with the perceived ethnicity of the animated agents. Despite a lack of significance the results provide enriching information about Latina adolescent perception of ethnicity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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First generation Latina persistence: group mentoring and sophomore success

Description

The purpose of this study was to help increase success for first-generation Latina students at Arizona State University by providing a group mentoring support experience during the spring semester of

The purpose of this study was to help increase success for first-generation Latina students at Arizona State University by providing a group mentoring support experience during the spring semester of their sophomore year. Thirteen first-generation Latinas in their sophomore year were recruited from the Obama Scholars Program at Arizona State University. These students participated in one or two 90-minute group mentoring intervention sessions during the spring semester of their sophomore year and responded to reflection questions at the end of each session. Additional data were collected through e-journaling and field notes to document the mentoring process and the short-term effects of the group mentoring intervention. Study participants named three themes as critical to their college success: college capital, confidence, and connections. Participants also reported that the intervention of group mentoring sessions helped them increase their knowledge of available resources, feel more confident about their remaining years in college, make connections with other first-generation Latinas, and convinced them to recommit themselves to working hard for immediate academic success to achieve their goal of becoming the first in their families to become a college graduate.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Validation theory into practice: asset-based academic advising with first-generation Latina engineering college students

Description

To meet the increasing demands for more STEM graduates, United States (U.S.) higher education institutions need to support the retention of minoritized populations, such as first-generation Latinas studying engineering. The

To meet the increasing demands for more STEM graduates, United States (U.S.) higher education institutions need to support the retention of minoritized populations, such as first-generation Latinas studying engineering. The theories influencing this study included critical race theory, the theory of validation, and community cultural wealth. Current advising practices, when viewed through a critical race theory lens, reinforce deficit viewpoints about students and reinforce color-blind ideologies. As such, current practices will fail to support first-generation Latina student persistence in engineering. A 10-week long study was conducted on validating advising practices. The advisors for the study were purposefully selected while the students were selected via a stratified sampling approach. Validating advising practices were designed to elicit student stories and explored the ways in which advisors validated or invalidated the students. Qualitative data were collected from interviews and reflections. Thematic analysis was conducted to study the influence of the validating advising practices. Results indicate each advisor acted as a different type of validating “agent” executing her practices described along a continuum of validating to invalidating practices. The students described their advisors’ practices along a continuum of prescriptive to developmental to transformational advising. While advisors began the study expressing deficit viewpoints of first-generation Latinas, the students shared multiple forms of navigational, social, aspirational, and informational capital. Those advisors who employed developmental and transformational practices recognized and drew upon those assets during their deployment of validating advising practices, thus leading to validation within the advising interactions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018