Matching Items (9)

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Analysis of Prehab’s Accessibility Based on Information Availability and Cost

Description

Despite the benefits of prehabilitation before surgery, many patients do not participate in these programs. Research has shown that prehab reduces the duration of hospital stays, thus the cost of

Despite the benefits of prehabilitation before surgery, many patients do not participate in these programs. Research has shown that prehab reduces the duration of hospital stays, thus the cost of hospitalization, and improves the recovery process from surgery. This paper aims to determine why prehab is not as common as rehab by evaluating its accessibility issues related to the amount of information accessible to patients, and the cost and insurance policies related to prehab. Telemedicine is also presented as a possible solution to the accessibility issues, and viewed as an alternative that can increase the number of prehab participants. Literature review and analysis of clinic websites indicates that information availability and cost presents accessibility issues to prehab. Although cost and information availability of prehab presents an accessibility problem, and telemedicine has the potential to increase the number of participants in prehab, it is found that many people still might not consider prehab as an option.
Studying prehab is interesting and it presents a unique case study of the benefits of preventative medicine. Preventative medicine is often not promoted because of the difficulty of measuring the benefits. But in the case of prehab, both the physical benefits and cost-savings are easily measurable. This paper presents an interesting and clear case study about the effectiveness of preventative medicine, and contributes important data in favor of shifting greater resources and attention to preventative medicine.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Therapp: A Physical Therapy Application to Improve Patient at Home Progress

Description

Research indicates patient adherence to physical therapy home exercise programs is low and this is confirmed anecdotally by people working in the field. Many patients do not improve at the

Research indicates patient adherence to physical therapy home exercise programs is low and this is confirmed anecdotally by people working in the field. Many patients do not improve at the desired rate because they are only coming into the clinic for two to three days a week and then do not continue with their exercises at home. This thesis project was focused on designing a mobile application that would better help physical therapists facilitate home exercises for their patients. The goals of this application were to make it easier for patients to remember what they need to do and how often they need to do it, to increase patient improvements by making it easier to access and complete assigned exercises, and to make the physical therapist more efficient and effective by assigning the exercises through a program that can be easily altered. In order to create this application, research on self-efficacy, adherence, and behavior strategies and theories was collected. Then, interviews with physical therapists and patients were completed to determine what content should be added to the application for patients to be successful and to determine what features they believed would best facilitate exercise adherence. Lastly, the application and its features were designed based on the collected research and interviews.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Predictive Power of Self-Determination Theory and Health Belief Model on Physical Therapy Patients' Adherence to Home Exercise Program

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between the constructs of motivational theories, Self-Determination Theory and Health Belief Model, and adherence to a home

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between the constructs of motivational theories, Self-Determination Theory and Health Belief Model, and adherence to a home exercise program. The constructs of Self-Determination Theory are autonomy, competence, and social relatedness. The constructs of Health Belief Model are perceived benefits, perceived barriers, perceived severity, and perceived susceptibility. Participants were receiving therapy at two outpatient clinics located in the Phoenix metropolitan area (n=40). Autonomy was assessed with a modified Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire. Competence was assessed with a modified Perceived Competence Scale. Social relatedness was assessed with a modified Health Care Climate Questionnaire. Perceived benefits and barriers were measured with a modified Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale. Perceived severity and susceptibility were measured with a modified Health Beliefs Questionnaire. Adherence was measured with one Likert-type question that was created by the researchers. The data was scored and analyzed with the scoring guidelines provided by the questionnaires and the statistics software, IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. The results showed that competence was the only construct that was significantly correlated with home exercise program adherence. The results from this study should be used for further research that focuses on creating a competence-supportive environment in physical therapy settings.

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Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Effect of Causal Attributions by Physical Therapy Patients for Recovery on Rehabilitation Adherence and Outcome Success

Description

The purpose of the present study was to determine if a relationship exists between adaptive patterns of causal attributions, adherence, and outcome success in physical therapy behavior. Adaptive casual attributions

The purpose of the present study was to determine if a relationship exists between adaptive patterns of causal attributions, adherence, and outcome success in physical therapy behavior. Adaptive casual attributions were defined as internal, controllable, and stable attributions as per Weiner's Attribution Theory of Motivation. Participants were seeking physical therapy for a post-surgical knee injury, with (n=3). Attributions were measured using the CDSII questionnaire, and outcome success was measured by the KOOS questionnaire to assess various dimensions of knee functionality. The respective physical therapist for the patient also completed the RAdMAT questionnaire to measure adherence. The data collected for all participants was analyzed qualitatively, with some emphasis on quantitative findings. Results showed mixed evidence for a relationship between adaptive attributions and adherence across the three participants. A trend toward a relationship between adaptive attributions and outcome success was observed in one participant. In addition, it was observed that adherence does play an indirect role in relating adaptive attributions and outcome success for physical therapy. Conclusions drawn from this pilot study should be used to further educate physical therapists and respective patients in how to improve adherence and experience positive outcomes for rehabilitation.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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My PTPro App - Circadian Health

Description

Physical therapy patients still receive their plan of care onto a piece of paper when there are hundreds of engaging physical therapy exercise videos on the internet. These exercise videos

Physical therapy patients still receive their plan of care onto a piece of paper when there are hundreds of engaging physical therapy exercise videos on the internet. These exercise videos are way more appealing to watch and physical therapists should consider delivering Home Exercise Programs (HEP) digitally. There are apps and online services such as Physioadvisor, Physprac app, Anterior Cruciate Ligament repair app, and work-out apps for people to create their own plan of care and are easily accessible with any electronic device. Most people are receiving information and learning through a lit screen anyways so it may only be a matter of time before people start using these resources instead of a physical therapist. Physical Therapists need to provide better resources for their patients and an app may be all they need. Figures of the results of the Qualtrics survey both Physical Therapists and Patient responses and were provided. A data analysis of each question and responses were interpreted to determine whether patients and physical therapists would like to use a physical therapy app as part of their rehab program. A Physiotherapy research journal with Switzerland researchers conducted a case study in a hospital and determined whether a HEP app testing was effective for patients to utilize.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Relationship between Motor Generalization and Motor Transfer

Description

Adapting to one novel condition of a motor task has been shown to generalize to other naïve conditions (i.e., motor generalization). In contrast, learning one task affects the proficiency of

Adapting to one novel condition of a motor task has been shown to generalize to other naïve conditions (i.e., motor generalization). In contrast, learning one task affects the proficiency of another task that is altogether different (i.e. motor transfer). Much more is known about motor generalization than about motor transfer, despite of decades of behavioral evidence. Moreover, motor generalization is studied as a probe to understanding how movements in any novel situations are affected by previous experiences. Thus, one could assume that mechanisms underlying transfer from trained to untrained tasks may be same as the ones known to be underlying motor generalization. However, the direct relationship between transfer and generalization has not yet been shown, thereby limiting the assumption that transfer and generalization rely on the same mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to test whether there is a relationship between motor generalization and motor transfer. To date, ten healthy young adult subjects were scored on their motor generalization ability and motor transfer ability on various upper extremity tasks. Although our current sample size is too small to clearly identify whether there is a relationship between generalization and transfer, Pearson product-moment correlation results and a priori power analysis suggest that a significant relationship will be observed with an increased sample size by 30%. If so, this would suggest that the mechanisms of transfer may be similar to those of motor generalization.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Characterizing motor learning of a novel reaching task in a virtual environment using kinematic evaluation

Description

Virtual environments are used for many physical rehabilitation and therapy purposes with varying degrees of success. An important feature for a therapy environment is the real-time monitoring of a participants'

Virtual environments are used for many physical rehabilitation and therapy purposes with varying degrees of success. An important feature for a therapy environment is the real-time monitoring of a participants' movement performance. Such monitoring can be used to evaluate the environment in addition to the participant's learning. Methods for monitoring and evaluation include tracking kinematic performance as well as monitoring muscle and brain activities through EMG and EEG technology. This study aims to observe trends in individual participants' motor learning based on changes in kinematic parameters and use those parameters to characterize different types of learners. This information can then guide EEG/EMG data analysis in the future. The evaluation of motor learning using kinematic parameters of performance typically compares averages of pre- and post-data to identify patterns of changes of various parameters. A key issue with using pre- and post-data is that individual participants perform differently and have different time-courses of learning. Furthermore, different parameters can evolve at independent rates. Finally, there is great variability in the movements at early stages of learning a task. To address these issues, a combined approach is proposed using robust regression, piece-wise regression and correlation to categorize different participant's motor learning. Using the mixed reality rehabilitation system developed at Arizona State University, it was possible to engage participants in motor learning, as revealed by improvements in kinematic parameters. A combination of robust regression, piecewise regression and correlation were used to reveal trends and characterize participants based on motor learning of three kinematic parameters: trajectory error, supination error and the number of phases in the velocity profile.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2010

Applied interdisciplinary concepts for designing visual media within interactive neurorehabilitation systems

Description

As the application of interactive media systems expands to address broader problems in health, education and creative practice, they fall within a higher dimensional space for which it is inherently

As the application of interactive media systems expands to address broader problems in health, education and creative practice, they fall within a higher dimensional space for which it is inherently more complex to design. In response to this need an emerging area of interactive system design, referred to as experiential media systems, applies hybrid knowledge synthesized across multiple disciplines to address challenges relevant to daily experience. Interactive neurorehabilitation (INR) aims to enhance functional movement therapy by integrating detailed motion capture with interactive feedback in a manner that facilitates engagement and sensorimotor learning for those who have suffered neurologic injury. While INR shows great promise to advance the current state of therapies, a cohesive media design methodology for INR is missing due to the present lack of substantial evidence within the field. Using an experiential media based approach to draw knowledge from external disciplines, this dissertation proposes a compositional framework for authoring visual media for INR systems across contexts and applications within upper extremity stroke rehabilitation. The compositional framework is applied across systems for supervised training, unsupervised training, and assisted reflection, which reflect the collective work of the Adaptive Mixed Reality Rehabilitation (AMRR) Team at Arizona State University, of which the author is a member. Formal structures and a methodology for applying them are described in detail for the visual media environments designed by the author. Data collected from studies conducted by the AMRR team to evaluate these systems in both supervised and unsupervised training contexts is also discussed in terms of the extent to which the application of the compositional framework is supported and which aspects require further investigation. The potential broader implications of the proposed compositional framework and methodology are the dissemination of interdisciplinary information to accelerate the informed development of INR applications and to demonstrate the potential benefit of generalizing integrative approaches, merging arts and science based knowledge, for other complex problems related to embodied learning.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Incidence of injury in relation to limb dominance in Arizona State University men's and women's gymnastics teams

Description

Previous research on gymnastics injuries has examined several differences in the types of injuries and event/location where injury is most likely to occur. This research shows that male gymnasts are

Previous research on gymnastics injuries has examined several differences in the types of injuries and event/location where injury is most likely to occur. This research shows that male gymnasts are more likely to have more upper body injuries compared to lower body injuries whereas female gymnasts are more likely to have lower body injuries. The majority of all gymnastics injuries are sprains that are most likely to occur during the landing phase on the floor exercise during routine performance or competition. Gymnastics injuries are also more prevalent in older gymnasts, like those at the collegiate level. However, there is limited research on the effects of limb dominance on injury occurrence in both male and female gymnasts at the collegiate level. This study was designed to examine the effect of both upper and lower body limb dominance on injury occurrence in Division I male and female gymnasts at Arizona State University during competition season. Thirty-seven subjects were recruited from the Arizona State University Men's and Women's Gymnastics teams. Athletic trainers/coaches from each team were asked to record injury incidence during the 2013 competition season from January through April. Injury type, body location, event of occurrence, and location of injury (practice or competition) were recorded along with the gymnast's upper and lower body limb dominance (right or left). Statistical analysis shows that there is a significant difference between male and female gymnasts in that female gymnasts are more likely to be injured than their male counterparts (P = 0.023). However, there were no significant findings between limb dominance and injury incidence. Limb dominance did not show any relationship with side of injury, but a trend in the data shows that right-sided dominant athletes, both upper and lower body, were more likely to be injured overall than left-sided dominant athletes. A trend in the data also shows that injury is more likely to occur on the floor exercise than any other gymnastics event for both men and women.

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Date Created
  • 2013