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Body Image, Eating Behaviors, and Wellness

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Introduction: A mini-documentary consisting of 4 student interviews and 1 professional interview was created for the purpose of providing examples of how body image and eating behaviors affect overall wellness and starting more conversation of this topic. Literature Review: A

Introduction: A mini-documentary consisting of 4 student interviews and 1 professional interview was created for the purpose of providing examples of how body image and eating behaviors affect overall wellness and starting more conversation of this topic. Literature Review: A review of some of the current literature involving body image and wellness interventions suggests that body image is a significant factor of health and wellbeing. Wellness interventions, mostly "non-diet" approaches, that omit weight loss as a primary goal could be a suitable solution for some people wanting to make sustainable healthy lifestyle changes. The social media site, YouTube, was chosen to share the documentary based on the ability of social media to reach more people, engage them, and spread messages and information quickly. Methods: Participants of the video were volunteers responding to an ad posted on the Barrett, the Honors College daily newsletter. Michelle May, M.D. was interviewed to provide a professional perspective on the subject. Questions asked of the student participants were meant to provide examples of how each of their relationships with their bodies and food affected their ideas of health and vice versa. Final Video: The final video, titled "Food & You" can be found on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ShmAzlx2GhM Discussion and Conclusion: Overall, weight and body size still seem to play a role in the ideas the students interviewed have of health. As more research into improving body image is done, knowing how to add this to personal and health professional practice should be encouraged. Moving away from the weight-focused idea of health could improve body image and overall wellness.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-12

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Comparison of Nutrition Resources Available to Non-Athlete Students at Pac-12 Schools

Description

University students currently lack sufficient knowledge and resources needed to support healthy eating patterns and nutrition. Comparison of the number of registered dietitians that are available to all students, along with the number of wellness events that are held at

University students currently lack sufficient knowledge and resources needed to support healthy eating patterns and nutrition. Comparison of the number of registered dietitians that are available to all students, along with the number of wellness events that are held at each university within the Pacific-12 conference will help determine which schools are best able to support their students' needs. Data was collected using a Google forms survey sent via email to wellness directors of each of the universities in the Pac-12 conference. Eight out of the twelve schools in the conference responded to the survey. The average number of dietitians available to all students (regardless of athlete status) was found to be 1.43 dietitians. Of the schools that responded, the University of Colorado, Boulder, has the most resources dedicated to student nutrition wellness with three dietitians available for all undergraduate students, free dietitian services, and approximately 150 wellness events each year. The success of available nutrition wellness resources was inconclusive as schools did not provide the information regarding student utilization and attendance. Future university promoted nutrition wellness programs should increase the number of affordable dietitians and total wellness events, as well as promote student health services through social media platforms to improve student nutrition knowledge and usage of resources.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Medical Storytelling: The Power of a Patient's Testimony

Description

Usually a medical website has a description, or overview, of the condition. Then there are different sections informing the viewer about the signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. There are some resource links for families to explore, but there

Usually a medical website has a description, or overview, of the condition. Then there are different sections informing the viewer about the signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. There are some resource links for families to explore, but there it provides more information rather than narration. What is lacking is a patient account or perspective on the given topic. This project suggests an added resource for parents and patients with its storytelling element that is irreplaceable. An example is also available using my own story growing up with hemifacial microsomia.

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Created

Date Created
2014-12

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Water proximity and its effect on consumption: in a corporate setting

Description

Water makes up about 45-70% of a human body's total weight. It is estimated that 80% of the human brain's tissue is composed of water. Cognitive productivity is altered when the body is in a mere 2% dehydrated state. Several

Water makes up about 45-70% of a human body's total weight. It is estimated that 80% of the human brain's tissue is composed of water. Cognitive productivity is altered when the body is in a mere 2% dehydrated state. Several cognitive functions impacted by dehydration include: visual motor tracing, short-term recall, attentiveness, and mathematic efficiency. It is estimated that 80% of the U.S. adult population endures the majority of their day in a mildly dehydrated state.

Participants were employees working full-time jobs with Arizona State University or Tri Star Motor Company. Employees had to be 18 or older were invited to join the study. Employees participating in the study lived within the the greater Phoenix area. Participants of all races, genders, activity statuses, and BMIs were encouraged to join.

A one-arm, pre-test, post-test study design was utilized. We examined whether the hydration status of participants in the intervention improved or worsened during the course of the intervention, and then attributed any such improvement or deterioration to the intervention. Urine collections from an afternoon sample were gathered before and after the one-week intervention. For the intervention, the participating offices received a water dispensing system in close proximity to employee desk spaces. A reusable water bottle was also given to each participant. Urine specific gravity (USG) was assessed in all urine samples to indicate hydration status, and all participants completed water intake surveys before and after the intervention.

From this study, the overall change in water intake over the course of the one-week intervention was 143 ounces/day. This is an average of adding two and a half 8 oz glasses of water each day of the week per participant. USG also decreased significantly at the end of the intervention in comparison to the baseline value. In the greater body of research, this study strengthens the viability of inputting a hydration station and offering reusable water bottles to employees. This cost-effective method is an easy way to incorporate employee wellness in the workplace. The benefit of employees to drink more water is numerous, including increased focus, mental reactivity, and overall mood and wellness.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018