Matching Items (13)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

133331-Thumbnail Image.png

An Observational Study of the Motivation of Long Distance Cyclists During Faith Based Charity Ride

Description

This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women: n=12) cycled at least one 302 mile segment of a

This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women: n=12) cycled at least one 302 mile segment of a bike ride distancing the whole West Coast (1,657 miles). The purpose of the study was to determine the motives for the cyclists' participation and to then classify those motives as intrinsic or extrinsic. A scale used to measure motivation of marathoners was transcribed to match those of the cycling participants to assess motivation. The participants were divided into 4 groups based on self-reported experience levels, and it was shown that across all types of experience levels, both intrinsic and extrinsic motivators were expressed but with greater emphasis on intrinsic factors. The most commonly indicated intrinsic motivation subcategories were life meaning, personal goal achievement, and affiliation, with affiliation being recognized by every individual. The most commonly indicated extrinsic subcategories were competition, recognition, health orientation, and weight concern. Though each rider's story was signature to the individual, the very specific religious background and philanthropic mission of the Fuller Center Bike Adventure weighed heavily into each individual's motivation alongside the classified intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Therefore, this research offered valuable data about motivation of recreational cyclists but future studies should focus on a less specific population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

134478-Thumbnail Image.png

Paddle With A Purpose: A Synthesis on My Perspective on Cultivating an Intentional Life of Happiness

Description

Happiness is an enormously broad topic that has recently gained momentum in the workplace, literature, media and society. There are many interconnected topics and themes contributing to the overall state of being happy. In my book, I dive into the

Happiness is an enormously broad topic that has recently gained momentum in the workplace, literature, media and society. There are many interconnected topics and themes contributing to the overall state of being happy. In my book, I dive into the most important topics that contribute to daily and global happiness. Each of the following topics are explored within the evidence-based literature and juxtaposed with my own life experience and perspective. First, I will explore society’s impact on happiness. Society shapes our perspective more than we realize, so it is important to debunk what rings true to us individually and what does not. Next, I’ll share with you my favorite thing in life—gratitude. Gratitude is the easiest way to transition a negative affect into a positive state of being. In chapter three I will discuss how language and perspective shape our experiences. Word choice and self-talk are extremely impactful in your relationship with yourself and your relationship with others. Chapter four is about complaining and how it serves us and inhibits us. There are many functions to complaining, like self-awareness and enhanced interpersonal relationships as well as consequences like being a draining friend to be around. Then I’ll share about the phenomenon of emotional contagion and compassion and finish it up with the final chapter about being present and practicing happiness in our daily lives. It is most important to live a life full of intentional daily actions. The tone of my book is conversational and meant to serve as an inspirational tool to aide in achieving a happier life.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

134058-Thumbnail Image.png

Body Image, Eating Behaviors, and Wellness

Description

Introduction: A mini-documentary consisting of 4 student interviews and 1 professional interview was created for the purpose of providing examples of how body image and eating behaviors affect overall wellness and starting more conversation of this topic. Literature Review: A

Introduction: A mini-documentary consisting of 4 student interviews and 1 professional interview was created for the purpose of providing examples of how body image and eating behaviors affect overall wellness and starting more conversation of this topic. Literature Review: A review of some of the current literature involving body image and wellness interventions suggests that body image is a significant factor of health and wellbeing. Wellness interventions, mostly "non-diet" approaches, that omit weight loss as a primary goal could be a suitable solution for some people wanting to make sustainable healthy lifestyle changes. The social media site, YouTube, was chosen to share the documentary based on the ability of social media to reach more people, engage them, and spread messages and information quickly. Methods: Participants of the video were volunteers responding to an ad posted on the Barrett, the Honors College daily newsletter. Michelle May, M.D. was interviewed to provide a professional perspective on the subject. Questions asked of the student participants were meant to provide examples of how each of their relationships with their bodies and food affected their ideas of health and vice versa. Final Video: The final video, titled "Food & You" can be found on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ShmAzlx2GhM Discussion and Conclusion: Overall, weight and body size still seem to play a role in the ideas the students interviewed have of health. As more research into improving body image is done, knowing how to add this to personal and health professional practice should be encouraged. Moving away from the weight-focused idea of health could improve body image and overall wellness.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-12

133922-Thumbnail Image.png

Comparison of Nutrition Resources Available to Non-Athlete Students at Pac-12 Schools

Description

University students currently lack sufficient knowledge and resources needed to support healthy eating patterns and nutrition. Comparison of the number of registered dietitians that are available to all students, along with the number of wellness events that are held at

University students currently lack sufficient knowledge and resources needed to support healthy eating patterns and nutrition. Comparison of the number of registered dietitians that are available to all students, along with the number of wellness events that are held at each university within the Pacific-12 conference will help determine which schools are best able to support their students' needs. Data was collected using a Google forms survey sent via email to wellness directors of each of the universities in the Pac-12 conference. Eight out of the twelve schools in the conference responded to the survey. The average number of dietitians available to all students (regardless of athlete status) was found to be 1.43 dietitians. Of the schools that responded, the University of Colorado, Boulder, has the most resources dedicated to student nutrition wellness with three dietitians available for all undergraduate students, free dietitian services, and approximately 150 wellness events each year. The success of available nutrition wellness resources was inconclusive as schools did not provide the information regarding student utilization and attendance. Future university promoted nutrition wellness programs should increase the number of affordable dietitians and total wellness events, as well as promote student health services through social media platforms to improve student nutrition knowledge and usage of resources.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

134088-Thumbnail Image.png

The Commit to be Well Program: An Effective Worksite Wellness Program

Description

Health and wellness coaching has shown promising results in numerous studies. However, there is lack of published research evaluating the impact of using wellness-coaching interventions implemented by coaching trainees in a worksite setting. The main objective was to examine the

Health and wellness coaching has shown promising results in numerous studies. However, there is lack of published research evaluating the impact of using wellness-coaching interventions implemented by coaching trainees in a worksite setting. The main objective was to examine the changes in self-reported scores of the 12-wellness dimensions of health in ASU students, faculty, and staff after participating in an eight-week health and wellness program. The secondary outcome was to evaluate if additional health and wellness recommendations had a significant impact. The participants were aged 18 to 58 years and were divided into two groups: the first group received health and wellness coaching, while the second group received the health and wellness coaching in addition to recommendations on specific worksite social/embedded programs and supporting activities. Both groups had significantly increased scores in Eating/Nutrition and Thinking (p<0.001 and P<0.014 respectively). Health and wellness coaching trainees were effective in assisting clients on reaching realistic progress. Our program shows potential benefits in worksite wellness.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2017-12

136197-Thumbnail Image.png

Assisted Cycling Improves Cognitive and Motor Functioning in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

Description

This study examines cognitive and motor function in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) following an 8-week assisted cycling therapy intervention. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of an assisted cycling (AC) (i.e., exercise accomplished through the use

This study examines cognitive and motor function in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) following an 8-week assisted cycling therapy intervention. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of an assisted cycling (AC) (i.e., exercise accomplished through the use of a motor), a voluntary cycling (VC) (self-selected cadence), and a no cycling (NC) control group. Both ACT and VC groups rode a stationary bicycle for three 30-minute sessions a week, for a total of eight weeks. Participants completed cognitive testing that assessed information processing and manual dexterity at the beginning and at the end of the 8-week intervention. Consistent with our hypothesis, the results showed that information processing and manual dexterity improved following 8 weeks of cycling for the ACT group. These results were not seen for individuals in the voluntary and non-exercise groups. Our results suggest that assisted cycling therapy may induce permanent changes in the prefrontal cortex in adolescents with DS.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-05

134923-Thumbnail Image.png

Corporate Wellness Communications: A Public Relations Strategy

Description

The following is a public relations strategy developed to position Julia Pearl Wellness, a corporate wellness consulting firm, and its owner, Julia Pearl, as credible, professional and experienced. The first portion includes a situational analysis, a research report on corporate

The following is a public relations strategy developed to position Julia Pearl Wellness, a corporate wellness consulting firm, and its owner, Julia Pearl, as credible, professional and experienced. The first portion includes a situational analysis, a research report on corporate wellness programs and the need for health solutions in the U.S., and market analysis. The campaign proposal, a creative product of the research, provides recommendations and tools for the firm to reach its stakeholders.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2016-12

135862-Thumbnail Image.png

Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) Improves Mobility in Adults with Down Syndrome

Description

The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on the lower body strength and aerobic capacity in adults with Down syndrome (DS). Six participants randomly completed one of two exercise interventions: 1) Voluntary

The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of two modes of exercise on the lower body strength and aerobic capacity in adults with Down syndrome (DS). Six participants randomly completed one of two exercise interventions: 1) Voluntary Cycling (VC), where participants cycled at their self-selected pedaling rate and 2) Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT), where the participants' voluntary pedaling rates were augmented by 35% with a motor. In each intervention, the participant completed three, 30-minute cycling sessions each week for a total of eight weeks. The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) was used to evaluate the distance each participant was able to complete in six minutes before and after the intervention. There was a significant increase in the distance and velocity of the participants after the intervention with a greater mean improvement for participants in the ACT group than VC when analyzing total score and t-score. Future research will include a greater sample size and control group to reach significant results as well as try and reveal the mechanisms involved in these physical health improvements found after an acute bout of assisted cycling in adults with DS.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-12

136476-Thumbnail Image.png

Assisted Cycling Therapy Improves Functional Exercise Capacity in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

Description

This study examined the effect of an 8-week exercise intervention on functional exercise capacity in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Forty participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: assisted cycling (ACT) (n = 17) where participants experienced at

This study examined the effect of an 8-week exercise intervention on functional exercise capacity in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Forty participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: assisted cycling (ACT) (n = 17) where participants experienced at least a 35% increase in their voluntary cycling speed through the use of a motor, voluntary cycling (VC) (n = 15) where participants cycled at a self-selected cadence, and no cycling (NC) (n = 8) where participants did not participate in any cycling intervention. In each cycling intervention, each participant completed three, 30 minute cycling sessions per week for a total of eight weeks. The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) was administered prior to and after the 8-week intervention in pre-test and post-test assessment sessions, respectively. Our hypothesis was somewhat supported in that functional exercise capacity improved after ACT as measured by an increase in total number of laps walked, total distance walked, and average walking speed during the 6MWT, when compared to VC or NC.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-05

137750-Thumbnail Image.png

Preferred Versus Recommended Saddle Height For Optimal Cycling Economy

Description

The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of changing a saddle height to a scientifically recommended position on cycling economy for competitive cyclists. Participants completed one maximal effort graded exercise test and two sub-maximal 70% economy trials,

The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of changing a saddle height to a scientifically recommended position on cycling economy for competitive cyclists. Participants completed one maximal effort graded exercise test and two sub-maximal 70% economy trials, one at the cyclist’s original saddle height and the second at the saddle height corresponding with a knee flexion angle of 25° at full pedal extension. Due to experimental error and equipment failure heart rate became the main performance measure and cycling economy tests were conducted at an average of 84.4% of heart rate max. The results revealed no apparent differences in performance between the recommended and original saddle height. However, 2D analysis of dynamic knee angles revealed that at the 25° knee angle condition, knee angle increased by an average of 16.1% from the static position (average dynamic knee angle = 29.02±4.61°). Dynamic measures (32.59±4.88°) taken during the original angle tests were only slightly augmented compared to the static measure (31.5±2.18°). It is possible based on this trend that a difference in performance values was not present because the change between the original angle and the experimental angle was not substantial. Additionally these findings suggest that cyclists adjust to these acute changes in saddle height by altering other kinematic variables in an attempt to find a comfortable position and perform maximally.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-05