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Three essays on comparative simulation in three-level hierarchical data structure

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Though the likelihood is a useful tool for obtaining estimates of regression parameters, it is not readily available in the fit of hierarchical binary data models. The correlated observations negate the opportunity to have a joint likelihood when fitting hierarchical

Though the likelihood is a useful tool for obtaining estimates of regression parameters, it is not readily available in the fit of hierarchical binary data models. The correlated observations negate the opportunity to have a joint likelihood when fitting hierarchical logistic regression models. Through conditional likelihood, inferences for the regression and covariance parameters as well as the intraclass correlation coefficients are usually obtained. In those cases, I have resorted to use of Laplace approximation and large sample theory approach for point and interval estimates such as Wald-type confidence intervals and profile likelihood confidence intervals. These methods rely on distributional assumptions and large sample theory. However, when dealing with small hierarchical datasets they often result in severe bias or non-convergence. I present a generalized quasi-likelihood approach and a generalized method of moments approach; both do not rely on any distributional assumptions but only moments of response. As an alternative to the typical large sample theory approach, I present bootstrapping hierarchical logistic regression models which provides more accurate interval estimates for small binary hierarchical data. These models substitute computations as an alternative to the traditional Wald-type and profile likelihood confidence intervals. I use a latent variable approach with a new split bootstrap method for estimating intraclass correlation coefficients when analyzing binary data obtained from a three-level hierarchical structure. It is especially useful with small sample size and easily expanded to multilevel. Comparisons are made to existing approaches through both theoretical justification and simulation studies. Further, I demonstrate my findings through an analysis of three numerical examples, one based on cancer in remission data, one related to the China’s antibiotic abuse study, and a third related to teacher effectiveness in schools from a state of southwest US.

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Date Created
2017

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Locally D-optimal designs for generalized linear models

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Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) are widely used for modeling responses with non-normal error distributions. When the values of the covariates in such models are controllable, finding an optimal (or at least efficient) design could greatly facilitate the work of collecting

Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) are widely used for modeling responses with non-normal error distributions. When the values of the covariates in such models are controllable, finding an optimal (or at least efficient) design could greatly facilitate the work of collecting and analyzing data. In fact, many theoretical results are obtained on a case-by-case basis, while in other situations, researchers also rely heavily on computational tools for design selection.

Three topics are investigated in this dissertation with each one focusing on one type of GLMs. Topic I considers GLMs with factorial effects and one continuous covariate. Factors can have interactions among each other and there is no restriction on the possible values of the continuous covariate. The locally D-optimal design structures for such models are identified and results for obtaining smaller optimal designs using orthogonal arrays (OAs) are presented. Topic II considers GLMs with multiple covariates under the assumptions that all but one covariate are bounded within specified intervals and interaction effects among those bounded covariates may also exist. An explicit formula for D-optimal designs is derived and OA-based smaller D-optimal designs for models with one or two two-factor interactions are also constructed. Topic III considers multiple-covariate logistic models. All covariates are nonnegative and there is no interaction among them. Two types of D-optimal design structures are identified and their global D-optimality is proved using the celebrated equivalence theorem.

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Agent

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Date Created
2018

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A study of components of Pearson's chi-square based on marginal distributions of cross-classified tables for binary variables

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The Pearson and likelihood ratio statistics are well-known in goodness-of-fit testing and are commonly used for models applied to multinomial count data. When data are from a table formed by the cross-classification of a large number of variables, these goodness-of-fit

The Pearson and likelihood ratio statistics are well-known in goodness-of-fit testing and are commonly used for models applied to multinomial count data. When data are from a table formed by the cross-classification of a large number of variables, these goodness-of-fit statistics may have lower power and inaccurate Type I error rate due to sparseness. Pearson's statistic can be decomposed into orthogonal components associated with the marginal distributions of observed variables, and an omnibus fit statistic can be obtained as a sum of these components. When the statistic is a sum of components for lower-order marginals, it has good performance for Type I error rate and statistical power even when applied to a sparse table. In this dissertation, goodness-of-fit statistics using orthogonal components based on second- third- and fourth-order marginals were examined. If lack-of-fit is present in higher-order marginals, then a test that incorporates the higher-order marginals may have a higher power than a test that incorporates only first- and/or second-order marginals. To this end, two new statistics based on the orthogonal components of Pearson's chi-square that incorporate third- and fourth-order marginals were developed, and the Type I error, empirical power, and asymptotic power under different sparseness conditions were investigated. Individual orthogonal components as test statistics to identify lack-of-fit were also studied. The performance of individual orthogonal components to other popular lack-of-fit statistics were also compared. When the number of manifest variables becomes larger than 20, most of the statistics based on marginal distributions have limitations in terms of computer resources and CPU time. Under this problem, when the number manifest variables is larger than or equal to 20, the performance of a bootstrap based method to obtain p-values for Pearson-Fisher statistic, fit to confirmatory dichotomous variable factor analysis model, and the performance of Tollenaar and Mooijaart (2003) statistic were investigated.

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Agent

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Date Created
2018

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Three essays on correlated binary outcomes: detection and appropriate models

Description

Correlation is common in many types of data, including those collected through longitudinal studies or in a hierarchical structure. In the case of clustering, or repeated measurements, there is inherent correlation between observations within the same group, or between observations

Correlation is common in many types of data, including those collected through longitudinal studies or in a hierarchical structure. In the case of clustering, or repeated measurements, there is inherent correlation between observations within the same group, or between observations obtained on the same subject. Longitudinal studies also introduce association between the covariates and the outcomes across time. When multiple outcomes are of interest, association may exist between the various models. These correlations can lead to issues in model fitting and inference if not properly accounted for. This dissertation presents three papers discussing appropriate methods to properly consider different types of association. The first paper introduces an ANOVA based measure of intraclass correlation for three level hierarchical data with binary outcomes, and corresponding properties. This measure is useful for evaluating when the correlation due to clustering warrants a more complex model. This measure is used to investigate AIDS knowledge in a clustered study conducted in Bangladesh. The second paper develops the Partitioned generalized method of moments (Partitioned GMM) model for longitudinal studies. This model utilizes valid moment conditions to separately estimate the varying effects of each time-dependent covariate on the outcome over time using multiple coefficients. The model is fit to data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) to investigate risk factors of childhood obesity. In the third paper, the Partitioned GMM model is extended to jointly estimate regression models for multiple outcomes of interest. Thus, this approach takes into account both the correlation between the multivariate outcomes, as well as the correlation due to time-dependency in longitudinal studies. The model utilizes an expanded weight matrix and objective function composed of valid moment conditions to simultaneously estimate optimal regression coefficients. This approach is applied to Add Health data to simultaneously study drivers of outcomes including smoking, social alcohol usage, and obesity in children.

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Agent

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Date Created
2018

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Essays on the identification and modeling of variance

Description

In the presence of correlation, generalized linear models cannot be employed to obtain regression parameter estimates. To appropriately address the extravariation due to correlation, methods to estimate and model the additional variation are investigated. A general form of the mean-variance

In the presence of correlation, generalized linear models cannot be employed to obtain regression parameter estimates. To appropriately address the extravariation due to correlation, methods to estimate and model the additional variation are investigated. A general form of the mean-variance relationship is proposed which incorporates the canonical parameter. The two variance parameters are estimated using generalized method of moments, negating the need for a distributional assumption. The mean-variance relation estimates are applied to clustered data and implemented in an adjusted generalized quasi-likelihood approach through an adjustment to the covariance matrix. In the presence of significant correlation in hierarchical structured data, the adjusted generalized quasi-likelihood model shows improved performance for random effect estimates. In addition, submodels to address deviation in skewness and kurtosis are provided to jointly model the mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis. The additional models identify covariates influencing the third and fourth moments. A cutoff to trim the data is provided which improves parameter estimation and model fit. For each topic, findings are demonstrated through comprehensive simulation studies and numerical examples. Examples evaluated include data on children’s morbidity in the Philippines, adolescent health from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, as well as proteomic assays for breast cancer screening.

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Agent

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Date Created
2018

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Spatial Regression and Gaussian Process BART

Description

Spatial regression is one of the central topics in spatial statistics. Based on the goals, interpretation or prediction, spatial regression models can be classified into two categories, linear mixed regression models and nonlinear regression models. This dissertation explored these models

Spatial regression is one of the central topics in spatial statistics. Based on the goals, interpretation or prediction, spatial regression models can be classified into two categories, linear mixed regression models and nonlinear regression models. This dissertation explored these models and their real world applications. New methods and models were proposed to overcome the challenges in practice. There are three major parts in the dissertation.

In the first part, nonlinear regression models were embedded into a multistage workflow to predict the spatial abundance of reef fish species in the Gulf of Mexico. There were two challenges, zero-inflated data and out of sample prediction. The methods and models in the workflow could effectively handle the zero-inflated sampling data without strong assumptions. Three strategies were proposed to solve the out of sample prediction problem. The results and discussions showed that the nonlinear prediction had the advantages of high accuracy, low bias and well-performed in multi-resolution.

In the second part, a two-stage spatial regression model was proposed for analyzing soil carbon stock (SOC) data. In the first stage, there was a spatial linear mixed model that captured the linear and stationary effects. In the second stage, a generalized additive model was used to explain the nonlinear and nonstationary effects. The results illustrated that the two-stage model had good interpretability in understanding the effect of covariates, meanwhile, it kept high prediction accuracy which is competitive to the popular machine learning models, like, random forest, xgboost and support vector machine.

A new nonlinear regression model, Gaussian process BART (Bayesian additive regression tree), was proposed in the third part. Combining advantages in both BART and Gaussian process, the model could capture the nonlinear effects of both observed and latent covariates. To develop the model, first, the traditional BART was generalized to accommodate correlated errors. Then, the failure of likelihood based Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) in parameter estimating was discussed. Based on the idea of analysis of variation, back comparing and tuning range, were proposed to tackle this failure. Finally, effectiveness of the new model was examined by experiments on both simulation and real data.

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Agent

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Date Created
2020