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Some topics concerning the singular value decomposition and generalized singular value decomposition

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This dissertation involves three problems that are all related by the use of the singular value decomposition (SVD) or generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD). The specific problems are (i) derivation of a generalized singular value expansion (GSVE), (ii) analysis of

This dissertation involves three problems that are all related by the use of the singular value decomposition (SVD) or generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD). The specific problems are (i) derivation of a generalized singular value expansion (GSVE), (ii) analysis of the properties of the chi-squared method for regularization parameter selection in the case of nonnormal data and (iii) formulation of a partial canonical correlation concept for continuous time stochastic processes. The finite dimensional SVD has an infinite dimensional generalization to compact operators. However, the form of the finite dimensional GSVD developed in, e.g., Van Loan does not extend directly to infinite dimensions as a result of a key step in the proof that is specific to the matrix case. Thus, the first problem of interest is to find an infinite dimensional version of the GSVD. One such GSVE for compact operators on separable Hilbert spaces is developed. The second problem concerns regularization parameter estimation. The chi-squared method for nonnormal data is considered. A form of the optimized regularization criterion that pertains to measured data or signals with nonnormal noise is derived. Large sample theory for phi-mixing processes is used to derive a central limit theorem for the chi-squared criterion that holds under certain conditions. Departures from normality are seen to manifest in the need for a possibly different scale factor in normalization rather than what would be used under the assumption of normality. The consequences of our large sample work are illustrated by empirical experiments. For the third problem, a new approach is examined for studying the relationships between a collection of functional random variables. The idea is based on the work of Sunder that provides mappings to connect the elements of algebraic and orthogonal direct sums of subspaces in a Hilbert space. When combined with a key isometry associated with a particular Hilbert space indexed stochastic process, this leads to a useful formulation for situations that involve the study of several second order processes. In particular, using our approach with two processes provides an independent derivation of the functional canonical correlation analysis (CCA) results of Eubank and Hsing. For more than two processes, a rigorous derivation of the functional partial canonical correlation analysis (PCCA) concept that applies to both finite and infinite dimensional settings is obtained.

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2012

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Bayesian networks and gaussian mixture models in multi-dimensional data analysis with application to religion-conflict data

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This thesis examines the application of statistical signal processing approaches to data arising from surveys intended to measure psychological and sociological phenomena underpinning human social dynamics. The use of signal processing methods for analysis of signals arising from measurement of

This thesis examines the application of statistical signal processing approaches to data arising from surveys intended to measure psychological and sociological phenomena underpinning human social dynamics. The use of signal processing methods for analysis of signals arising from measurement of social, biological, and other non-traditional phenomena has been an important and growing area of signal processing research over the past decade. Here, we explore the application of statistical modeling and signal processing concepts to data obtained from the Global Group Relations Project, specifically to understand and quantify the effects and interactions of social psychological factors related to intergroup conflicts. We use Bayesian networks to specify prospective models of conditional dependence. Bayesian networks are determined between social psychological factors and conflict variables, and modeled by directed acyclic graphs, while the significant interactions are modeled as conditional probabilities. Since the data are sparse and multi-dimensional, we regress Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) against the data to estimate the conditional probabilities of interest. The parameters of GMMs are estimated using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. However, the EM algorithm may suffer from over-fitting problem due to the high dimensionality and limited observations entailed in this data set. Therefore, the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) are used for GMM order estimation. To assist intuitive understanding of the interactions of social variables and the intergroup conflicts, we introduce a color-based visualization scheme. In this scheme, the intensities of colors are proportional to the conditional probabilities observed.

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2012

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Observability methods in sensor scheduling

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Modern measurement schemes for linear dynamical systems are typically designed so that different sensors can be scheduled to be used at each time step. To determine which sensors to use, various metrics have been suggested. One possible such metric is

Modern measurement schemes for linear dynamical systems are typically designed so that different sensors can be scheduled to be used at each time step. To determine which sensors to use, various metrics have been suggested. One possible such metric is the observability of the system. Observability is a binary condition determining whether a finite number of measurements suffice to recover the initial state. However to employ observability for sensor scheduling, the binary definition needs to be expanded so that one can measure how observable a system is with a particular measurement scheme, i.e. one needs a metric of observability. Most methods utilizing an observability metric are about sensor selection and not for sensor scheduling. In this dissertation we present a new approach to utilize the observability for sensor scheduling by employing the condition number of the observability matrix as the metric and using column subset selection to create an algorithm to choose which sensors to use at each time step. To this end we use a rank revealing QR factorization algorithm to select sensors. Several numerical experiments are used to demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

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2015

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Numerical computation of Wishart eigenvalue distributions for multistatic radar detection

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Eigenvalues of the Gram matrix formed from received data frequently appear in sufficient detection statistics for multi-channel detection with Generalized Likelihood Ratio (GLRT) and Bayesian tests. In a frequently presented model for passive radar, in which the null hypothesis is

Eigenvalues of the Gram matrix formed from received data frequently appear in sufficient detection statistics for multi-channel detection with Generalized Likelihood Ratio (GLRT) and Bayesian tests. In a frequently presented model for passive radar, in which the null hypothesis is that the channels are independent and contain only complex white Gaussian noise and the alternative hypothesis is that the channels contain a common rank-one signal in the mean, the GLRT statistic is the largest eigenvalue $\lambda_1$ of the Gram matrix formed from data. This Gram matrix has a Wishart distribution. Although exact expressions for the distribution of $\lambda_1$ are known under both hypotheses, numerically calculating values of these distribution functions presents difficulties in cases where the dimension of the data vectors is large. This dissertation presents tractable methods for computing the distribution of $\lambda_1$ under both the null and alternative hypotheses through a technique of expanding known expressions for the distribution of $\lambda_1$ as inner products of orthogonal polynomials. These newly presented expressions for the distribution allow for computation of detection thresholds and receiver operating characteristic curves to arbitrary precision in floating point arithmetic. This represents a significant advancement over the state of the art in a problem that could previously only be addressed by Monte Carlo methods.

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2019