Matching Items (15)

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Reevaluating the NACC Curricular Guidelines through a Mixed Methods Approach at Arizona State University

Description

The nonprofit sector has experienced exponential growth in recent decades, thus creating a separate industry for nonprofits—an industry that requires education and training to run efficiently and successfully. As a

The nonprofit sector has experienced exponential growth in recent decades, thus creating a separate industry for nonprofits—an industry that requires education and training to run efficiently and successfully. As a result, Nonprofit Management Education (NME) at both graduate and undergraduate levels has steadily increased in number and demand. Recent changes in the political climate and changes in the government funding present new challenges to nonprofit professionals, thus enhancing the value of specific NME to prepare professionals for these challenges. To leverage NME and ensure that students are adequately prepared for these challenges, it is important to design curriculum that addresses the needs of the growing nonprofit industry. The Nonprofit Academic Center of Councils is the creator of the NACC Curricular Guidelines, which are currently used as a model all NME curricula should emulate. This study utilizes Arizona State University (ASU) to compare its current curriculum model to the NACC Curricular Guidelines, as well as the current challenges facing the nonprofit sector. In so doing, this study will provide an in-depth overview of NME at ASU through 1) focus groups of nonprofit leaders; 2) survey data from former students; and 3) curriculum mapping.

The comprehensive results indicated areas of opportunity for both ASU and the NACC Curricular Guidelines. According to the feedback of students, nonprofit professionals, and the current state of the ASU curriculum, ASU may wish to increase emphasis on Financial Management, Managing Staff and Volunteers, Assessment, Evaluation, and Decision Making, and Leading and Managing Nonprofit Organizations. After considering feedback from nonprofit professionals, NACC may consider amending some new competencies that reflect an emphasis on collective impact, cross sector leadership, or relationship building and the use of technology for nonprofit impact. The research team recommends accomplishing these changes through enhancing pedagogy by including case studies and an integrated curriculum into the ASU NME program. by applying the suggested changes to both the ASU curriculum and the NACC guidelines, this research prepares both ASU and NACC towards the process of accreditation and formalizing the NLM degree on a national level.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Case Study of Value Analysis, Connecting Customer Demands and Product Performances

Description

The case study is designed based on two analytical techniques: Value Analysis (VA) and Quality Function Development (QFD). VA and QFD are two effective methods to help manufacturers to achieve

The case study is designed based on two analytical techniques: Value Analysis (VA) and Quality Function Development (QFD). VA and QFD are two effective methods to help manufacturers to achieve cost reductions. The idea of designing an in-class workshop is taking the characteristic of QFD, which is customer preference analysis, and applying it to value analysis procedure to attain a goal of satisfying customer demands more effectively. The workshop aims to help students understand the significance of knowing customer requirements during the manufacturing process and demonstrate the effect of VA, which is supporting organizations to focus their development activities on areas that provide the greatest customer value. The workshop took place near the end of Spring 2020 semester for students who took the managerial accounting course. Students worked remotely on the project in teams. Each team analyzed one of the four products, Hummer H2, Ferrari 488, Large Luxury SUV, and Supercar. By following steps, students developed the importance ranking for vehicle functions and discussed their results, and eventually, they calculated system costs based on the rating results. As part of the workshop, students participated in a pre-class survey and a post-class survey, indicating their learning experiences and providing feedback. Through the analysis of the surveys, most of the students were satisfied with the instructions of the workshop and comfortable with learning materials. Considering the continuation of the workshop, recommendations on online structure and in-class settings will help to improve the effectiveness and learning outcomes of the in-class case study.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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A Comparative Analysis of the Human Capital in Costa Rica

Description

This paper seeks to explore connections between the industries and sociopolitical environment in Costa Rica and human capital. Human capital for the purpose of this paper is an individual or

This paper seeks to explore connections between the industries and sociopolitical environment in Costa Rica and human capital. Human capital for the purpose of this paper is an individual or a population’s ability to produce goods and services concerning human factors of productivity namely their health, education, or technical skillset. This question is interesting because improving human capital, in general, allows for more goods and services to be produced, and therefore higher welfare. This means recognizing conditions that improve human capital may provide a guide to enhanced prosperity. The paper identifies the characteristic industries in Costa Rica as tropical agriculture and small electronics manufacturing, provides insight as to how on the job training and externalities of these industries might affect human capital, and compares other similar nations’ data to world data provided by the world bank. The other central aim is to draw insight on how a nation having a standing military might impact human capital, which is relevant because Costa Rica abolished its military over fifty years ago.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Addressing Mental Health in Rural Indian Primary Schools Through Experiential Learning: A Viable Model?

Description

Social-emotional learning (SEL) methods are beginning to receive global attention in primary school education, yet the dominant emphasis on implementing these curricula is in high-income, urbanized areas. Consequently, the unique

Social-emotional learning (SEL) methods are beginning to receive global attention in primary school education, yet the dominant emphasis on implementing these curricula is in high-income, urbanized areas. Consequently, the unique features of developing and integrating such methods in middle- or low-income rural areas are unclear. Past studies suggest that students exposed to SEL programs show an increase in academic performance, improved ability to cope with stress, and better attitudes about themselves, others, and school, but these curricula are designed with an urban focus. The purpose of this study was to conduct a needs-based analysis to investigate components specific to a SEL curriculum contextualized to rural primary schools. A promising organization committed to rural educational development is Barefoot College, located in Tilonia, Rajasthan, India. In partnership with Barefoot, we designed an ethnographic study to identify and describe what teachers and school leaders consider the highest needs related to their students' social and emotional education. To do so, we interviewed 14 teachers and school leaders individually or in a focus group to explore their present understanding of “social-emotional learning” and the perception of their students’ social and emotional intelligence. Analysis of this data uncovered common themes among classroom behaviors and prevalent opportunities to address social and emotional well-being among students. These themes translated into the three overarching topics and eight sub-topics explored throughout the curriculum, and these opportunities guided the creation of the 21 modules within it. Through a design-based research methodology, we developed a 40-hour curriculum by implementing its various modules within seven Barefoot classrooms alongside continuous reiteration based on teacher feedback and participant observation. Through this process, we found that student engagement increased during contextualized SEL lessons as opposed to traditional methods. In addition, we found that teachers and students preferred and performed better with an activities-based approach. These findings suggest that rural educators must employ particular teaching strategies when addressing SEL, including localized content and an experiential-learning approach. Teachers reported that as their approach to SEL shifted, they began to unlock the potential to build self-aware, globally-minded students. This study concludes that social and emotional education cannot be treated in a generalized manner, as curriculum development is central to the teaching-learning process.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The effect of corpus callosum agenesis on the communication between cerebral hemispheres

Description

Agenesis of the corpus callosum is the lack of the development of the corpus callosum. This condition can lead to impairments in language processing, epilepsy, and emotion and social functioning,

Agenesis of the corpus callosum is the lack of the development of the corpus callosum. This condition can lead to impairments in language processing, epilepsy, and emotion and social functioning, but many individuals with this condition do not show any of these impairments. The present study investigated the connectivity of language and sensorimotor networks within an individual with agenesis of the corpus callosum using resting-state fMRI. The individual’s results were compared to those of neurotypical control subjects. It was hypothesized that the overall interhemispheric functional connectivity would be less than that of a control group in bilateral language networks, but the intrahemispheric connectivity, particularly within the sensorimotor network, would show greater functional connectivity. The results revealed significantly weaker functional connectivity in the individual with agenesis of the corpus callosum within the right ventral stream compared to the control group. There were no other significant inter or intrahemispheric differences in the functional connectivity of the language and sensorimotor networks. These findings lead us to conclude that the right hemisphere’s ventral stream perhaps relies upon connections with the left hemisphere’s language networks to maintain its typical functionality. The results of this study support the idea that, in the case of corpus callosum agenesis, the right language network may contribute differently to language processes than in neurotypical controls.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Treatment of Brachial Plexus Palsy with Splinting and Exercise: A Case Study

Description

This case study describes an adult patient whose brachial plexus injury was treated with various modalities and exercise. The participant of this study was a 76 year old female who

This case study describes an adult patient whose brachial plexus injury was treated with various modalities and exercise. The participant of this study was a 76 year old female who sustained a brachial plexus injury during an elective reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The initial evaluation reported only passive range of motion with 90 degrees shoulder flexion, 85 degrees abduction, and 30 degrees external rotation. Muscle testing yielded significantly limited wrist and digit extension strength. Testing of sensation found diminished protective sensation along the median nerve distribution, including the thumb, index finger, and middle finger. Occupational therapy was initiated for postoperative treatment of the shoulder as well as treatment of the brachial plexus palsy. Therapy consisted of static splinting for healing structures and sensory reeducation through massage, finding objects with the eyes occluded, and fluidotherapy. Additionally, various exercises and modalities for improving motion and strength were initiated, including proprioceptive neuromuscular reeducation, passive/active assist/active exercises, dynamic splinting, muscle stimulation, kinesio tape, functional activities, and tendon glides. After five months, active range of motion in the shoulder, elbow, and wrist was finally achieved and median nerve sensation had improved. After nine months, elbow motion was within normal limits and wrist motion had significantly improved. Upon muscle testing, the elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand had made significant gains in strength. However, shoulder strength and motion was still limited. Overall, treatment made a significant improvement in the patient’s functionality.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Six Sigma in the Manufacturing Industry

Description

Evidence of Six Sigma principles dates back as far as the 1800s when normal distributions were first being introduced by Friedrich Gauss. Since then, Six Sigma has evolved and been

Evidence of Six Sigma principles dates back as far as the 1800s when normal distributions were first being introduced by Friedrich Gauss. Since then, Six Sigma has evolved and been documented into the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) methodology that is used today. Each stage in the DMAIC methodology serves a unique purpose, and various tools have been developed to accomplish each stage’s goal. The manufacturing industry has developed its own more specified set of methods and tools that have been coined as Lean Six Sigma. The more notable Lean Six Sigma principles are TIMWOOD, SMED, and 5S.

As a case study, DMAIC methodology was used at a company that encourages Six Sigma in all its departments—Niagara Bottling. Ultimately, the company was able to cut its financial losses in fines from customers by over 15% in just a 12-week span by utilizing Six Sigma. In this, the importance of instilling an entire culture of Six Sigma is exemplified. When only a handful of team members are on board with the problem-solving mindset, it is significantly more difficult to see substantial improvements.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Impact and Feasibility of Pedestrianization Proposals of Mill Ave. and the Downtown Tempe Area

Description

The idea of a packed promenade, crowded with busy shoppers and completely empty of cars may seem like a holdover from rustic 19th century Europe — but many present day

The idea of a packed promenade, crowded with busy shoppers and completely empty of cars may seem like a holdover from rustic 19th century Europe — but many present day examples can be found right here in the United States — in college towns like Madison, WI, big cities like Denver CO, and lots of places in between. In recent years, proposals to change Mill Ave. here in Tempe have been introduced to modify University Dr. to Rio Salado Pkwy. into just that type of pedestrianized shopping mall, closing it to all automobile traffic outside of emergency vehicles.
As two students who frequent the potentially affected area, we explore the feasibility of such a proposal to continue to grow the downtown Tempe economy. Our research focuses upon several different areas — exploring positive and negative cases of street pedestrianization (whether in Europe, the United States, or other countries), the impact a permanent street closure in Tempe would have both on personal traffic and on the city’s robust public transit system, potential security concerns, opinions of the business community on the proposed change, and the political feasibility of passing the proposal through the Tempe City Council.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Value creation of private equity funds: practices in China

Description

Based on multiple case studies of the transactions in China by private equity funds, this paper attempts to explore the value-creation capabilities of private equity funds at the transaction/deal level.

Based on multiple case studies of the transactions in China by private equity funds, this paper attempts to explore the value-creation capabilities of private equity funds at the transaction/deal level.

Previous studies on financial performance of PE funds utilized data collected from publically traded companies in European/US markets. By measuring financial performance of both “pre- and post-transactions,” these studies researched two questions: 1) Do buyout funds create value? 2) If they do, what are the sources of value creation? In general, studies conclude that private equity/buyout funds do create value at both the deal level and investor level. They also identified four possible sources of such value creation: 1) undervaluation, 2) leverage effect, 3) better governance, and 4) operational improvement.

However, relatively little is known about the process of value creation. In this study, I attempt to fill that gap, revealing the “secret recipe” of value creation.

By carefully looking into the process of value creation, this study suggests five propositions covering capabilities at 1) deal selection/screening, 2) deal structuring, 3) operational improvement, 4) investment exit, and 5) Top Management Team (TMT). These capabilities at private equity/buyout funds are critical factors for value creation. In a thorough review of the value-creation process, this paper hopes to:

1) Share real-life experiences and lessons learned on private equity transactions in China as a developing economy.

2) Reveal the process of deal/transaction to observe measures taken place within deal/transaction for value creation.

3) Show how well-executed strategies and capabilities in deal selection/screening, deal structuring, operational improvement, and investment exit can still create value for private equity firms without financial leverage.

4) Share the experience of State-Owned Enterprises (SOE) reform participated in by private equity firms in China. This could provide valuable information for policy makers in China.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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A multiplicity of successes: capabilities, refuge, and pathways in contemporary community colleges

Description

Community colleges, like all higher education institutions in the United States, have not been immune to the increased national focus on educational accountability and institutional effectiveness over the past three

Community colleges, like all higher education institutions in the United States, have not been immune to the increased national focus on educational accountability and institutional effectiveness over the past three decades. Federal and non-governmental initiatives aimed at tracking and reporting on institutional outcomes have focused on utilitarian academic and economic measures of student success that homogenize the goals, aspirations, and challenges of the individuals who attend these unique open-access institutions. This dissertation, which is comprised of three submission-ready scholarly peer-reviewed articles, examined community college students’ conceptualizations and valuations of “student success.” The research project was designed as a multiple methods single-site case study, and the data sources consisted of a large-scale student e-survey, follow-up semi-structured interviews with a heterogeneous group of students, semi-structured interviews with faculty and administrators, and a review of institutional documents. The interviews also incorporated two experimental visual elicitation techniques and a participatory ranking exercise. Article One introduces and operationalizes the author’s primary conceptual perspective, the capabilities approach, to develop a more comprehensive framework for understanding and evaluating community college student outcomes. This article documents the methodological process used to generate a theoretical and an empirical list of community college capabilities, which serve as the basis of future capabilities-based research on community college student success. Article Two draws on the student interview and student visual elicitation data to explore the capability category of “refuge” – a new, unexpected, and student-valued purpose of the community college as a safe escape from the complexities and demands of personal, home, and work life. In light of recent efforts to promote more structured and prescriptive college experiences to improve graduation rates, Article Three explores students’ perceptions of their pathways through the community college using the participant-generated and researcher-generated visual elicitation data. Findings indicate that students value the structure and the flexibility community colleges offer, as well as their own ability to be agents and architects of their educational experience. Taken together, these articles suggest that student success is less linear and more rhizomatic in structure than it is currently portrayed in the literature.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015